Equipped To Survive Equipped To Survive® Presents
The Survival Forum
Where do you want to go on ETS?

Page 2 of 3 < 1 2 3 >
Topic Options
#96216 - 05/31/07 08:29 PM Re: So you just got your first knife? [Re: Naseem]
Frankie Offline
Old Hand

Registered: 09/19/03
Posts: 736
Loc: Montréal, Québec, Canada
Last fall I cut into small pieces and peeled a whole large pumpkin. It's a real test for your knife and particularly the handle. I didn't cut myself, luckily but I did end up with nasty blisters on the hand. That's why I'm looking at the traditional Mora knife with the oval wooden handle with consideration and acknowledge that a guard does get in the way.

I don't have much experience in the bush. I got myself Mors Kochanski's DVDs and watched Blades Sharpening & Safe Use. He has like 30 years of experience as a survival instructor and has good tips about the safe use of knives, axes and saws. He carries his knife around his neck, something he learned from the inuits. With all the bulky clothing needed for the cold winters in Canada, it's just more convenient to carry it around the neck. Cody Lundin also carries his around his neck because generally you're much aware of its presence and it's easier to put it back in its sheath this way.

I'm a city boy I must confess, who dreams of adventure as a hobby. As far as urban EDC goes, I played a lot with my new Spyderco Delica and managed to cut myself also. It's unavoidable. Especially when I first attempted to fold it back one handed by giving it a swing and stopping it with the index finger because I think the blade "wastage" at the heel is there for that reason. I got the hang of it now.

Frankie

Top
#96217 - 05/31/07 08:46 PM Re: So you just got your first knife? [Re: jmarkantes]
monkey Offline
Newbie

Registered: 10/06/06
Posts: 42
Loc: Portland, OR
Originally Posted By: jmarkantes
Quote:
Heh, I bouhgt my leatherman wave, opened the package and flipped open a knife balde to see how it worked and saw drops of blood on the desk. Hadn't even used it yet and cut myself.

Same here, but I was cut by the f@%&! plastic packaging. I'm tempted next time I get a new leatherman to throw the whole thing into a fire and let the plastic melt/burn off. eek
Jason


AAAahhhhh... thermoformed clamshell packaging. Done the same thing myself. Good thing liquor doesn't come in that packaging. Don't know if I'd die of thirst or blood loss first.

In a total moment of chaos, I once knocked a butcher's knife off the counter, missing my knee high daughter by inches. The knife grazed my big, bare toe as the point sliced into the floor. For a split second... I think my heart stopped. Decent amount of blood, but little real damage.


Let us know how your fire idea works! Don't forget to mention how you built it. No cheatin' now.



m

Top
#96221 - 05/31/07 08:57 PM Re: So you just got your first knife? [Re: monkey]
jmarkantes Offline
Member

Registered: 05/02/05
Posts: 138
Loc: Portland, OR, USA
Most definitely, blood loss.

Your toe story reminds me of one time I ended up with a dart in my toe, through the shoe. Thrown by a very attractive brunette in a bar. But then, it was St Paddy's day, and at 9am already 2 hours into a good day.

J

Top
#96224 - 05/31/07 09:31 PM Re: So you just got your first knife? [Re: Tom_L]
jamesraykenney Offline
Enthusiast

Registered: 03/12/04
Posts: 315
Loc: Beaumont, TX USA
Originally Posted By: Tom_L
I agree, it takes a while to reach the point when your knife becomes an extension of your arm. I never really thought about that myself, growing up with a SAK and puuko since I was 7 or so. But looking at a lot of my friends and camping buddies I can also see that most urban dwellers nowadays aren't used to handling a knife safely and effectively. Which is a shame considering it's one of man's oldest tools.


I agree completely...
Protecting children from knives it one of the most counterproductive things we can do... Safe knife handling, needs to be learned early enough for it to be instinctive...

Originally Posted By: Tom_L

As for knife safety, it's all about common sense. Never cut toward yourself, always keep the edge sharp, don't let any fingers get in the way and you'll be fine. Whittling sticks and carving wood when you have some spare time is excellent practice and will teach you almost all skills you'll need. Larger chopping blades or machetes are more dangerous but still entirely safe as long as you follow a few obvious precautions.


The precautions for large chopping blades and machetes are not AT ALL obvious...
The first time you perform a 'draw' cut with a good machete, or golok, and it slices right through FIVE INCHES of hardwood without much effort, and continues on to cut your kneecap, you will find that out...
It happened to me, but fortunately the limb was SIX inches thick, and the blade followed the grain and stuck in the limb... And I KNEW about large blade safety beforehand...

PLEASE read this article on the safe handling of big blades before using them...
Handling and working with knives, big blades, axes and hatchets

Top
#96228 - 05/31/07 09:42 PM Re: So you just got your first knife? [Re: jamesraykenney]
Be_Prepared Offline
Addict

Registered: 12/07/04
Posts: 530
Loc: Massachusetts
It's as predictable as the tide...

Whenever we run a "Totin' Chip" class, to teach knife safety to new boys, and they receive their "license to carry", within an hour, the first aid kit is coming out.

The older kids actually bet with their favorite trail snacks to see which of the new guys is going to cut himself first. I'm sure we're not supposed to condone that, but, it's a right of passage.
_________________________

- Ron

Top
#96242 - 05/31/07 10:43 PM Re: So you just got your first knife? [Re: Be_Prepared]
Rio Offline
Member

Registered: 11/26/06
Posts: 112
Loc: Pacific North West
I remember my first real knife, I had a few imitation SAKs before this but I don't count them. I was maybe 10 at the time, had just moved from Cub Scouts to Boy Scouts, and my parents took me to REI to buy a multi tool.

I looked at a few and settled on the Gerber, I really like the way you could flip the pliers out single handed. I was feeling the blade for sharpness and managed to slice my finger open in the store and started bleeding on the display case. Like I said, I was 10 and had no idea what I was doing. The clerk kind of luaghed and jokingly said, "well you bled on it, guess you have to buy it." I had already selected it as my favorite, so that worked out ok.

Later, when I got home, I started to practice flipping the pliers out. Next thing I knew the tool slipped out of my hand and embedded itself into my closet door. I still have the tool, and it's still one of my favorites. However, lately it has spent more time on my book shelf than anything due to it's sentimental value.

Top
#96244 - 05/31/07 11:15 PM Re: So you just got your first knife? [Re: Be_Prepared]
monkey Offline
Newbie

Registered: 10/06/06
Posts: 42
Loc: Portland, OR
Originally Posted By: Be_Prepared
It's as predictable as the tide...

Whenever we run a "Totin' Chip" class, to teach knife safety to new boys, and they receive their "license to carry", within an hour, the first aid kit is coming out.

The older kids actually bet with their favorite trail snacks to see which of the new guys is going to cut himself first. I'm sure we're not supposed to condone that, but, it's a right of passage.


That is just awesome! Same thing happened in my Scout troop!! One hour... tops. Soda was the huge bet. It was worth more than it's weight in gold!!

I sure miss those days.

m

Top
#96271 - 06/01/07 02:02 AM Re: So you just got your first knife? [Re: jmarkantes]
big_al Offline
Addict

Registered: 01/04/06
Posts: 586
Loc: 20mi east of San Diego


Me thinks you just dated yourself, Darts haven't had steel points in a bar in years. smile
At least not in the U.S. ( some crap about being to dangerious) laugh

_________________________
Some people try to turn back their odometers.
Not me, I want people to know "why" I look this way
I've traveled a long way and some of the roads weren't paved

Top
#96285 - 06/01/07 03:08 AM Re: So you just got your first knife? [Re: big_al]
jmarkantes Offline
Member

Registered: 05/02/05
Posts: 138
Loc: Portland, OR, USA
Haha! Actually, I'm just in my lower 30's. smile But there are some great bars around here! Most of the British and Irish pubs still have metal darts. If anything, I think certain brunettes in my life are dangerous. grin

That incident was '06, I think. That holiday tends to get very hazy...

J

Top
#96297 - 06/01/07 06:10 AM Re: So you just got your first knife? [Re: jamesraykenney]
Tom_L Offline
Addict

Registered: 03/19/07
Posts: 690
Quote:
The precautions for large chopping blades and machetes are not AT ALL obvious...
The first time you perform a 'draw' cut with a good machete, or golok, and it slices right through FIVE INCHES of hardwood without much effort, and continues on to cut your kneecap, you will find that out...
It happened to me, but fortunately the limb was SIX inches thick, and the blade followed the grain and stuck in the limb... And I KNEW about large blade safety beforehand...


I don't know, I grew up helping my dad in the woods and all so maybe I see things a little differently. But personally I don't think there's much mystery to using a large chopper or machete safely. Always cut away from yourself, always be in full control of the tool and visualize how the blade is going to travel to target (with follow through). You also have to watch out for any obstructions in the path of the blade (even a small twig can deflect your tool as you swing it, very dangerous) and keep a safety distance from your buddies when working in a group. It's not that difficult. The real challenge is developing optimal technique so that you use minimum effort on your end and let the tool do most of the job with its own weight. That's very important when you have to work all day long.

These things are best learned through experience. But if machetes are dangerous, what about axes? I worked with my woodman's pal since I was 8 or 9 but my dad never allowed me near an axe until I was into my teens. Using an axe takes much more skill and control, but it really is worth it because you can accomplish a lot more work with it. There's no need to be afraid of tools. Get to know them better, ask a friend or relative from the countryside to show you how it's done. It's a great way to pick up useful skills.

Top
Page 2 of 3 < 1 2 3 >



Moderator:  Alan_Romania, Blast, cliff, Hikin_Jim 
November
Su M Tu W Th F Sa
1 2 3 4 5 6 7
8 9 10 11 12 13 14
15 16 17 18 19 20 21
22 23 24 25 26 27 28
29 30
Who's Online
2 registered (hikermor, NAro), 145 Guests and 4 Spiders online.
Key: Admin, Global Mod, Mod
Newest Members
Knobco, KennethCopeland, manimal, Sherette, ohmysan
5328 Registered Users
Newest Posts
Black Swans
by hikermor
Question from planet Mars
by Blast
07:11 PM
2020
by brandtb
04:46 PM
Happy Thanksgiving!
by Phaedrus
02:07 AM
Soft Shackle
by TonyE
11/25/20 10:58 PM
New bag thinking: BOB GHB realism
by TeacherRO
11/23/20 01:52 AM
Dash Cams
by Doug_Ritter
11/19/20 11:30 PM
A Hot Topic
by Blast
11/17/20 09:49 PM
Newest Images
Tiny knife / wrench
Handmade knives
2"x2" Glass Signal Mirror, Retroreflective Mesh
Trade School Tool Kit
My Pocket Kit
Glossary
Test

WARNING & DISCLAIMER: SELECT AND USE OUTDOORS AND SURVIVAL EQUIPMENT, SUPPLIES AND TECHNIQUES AT YOUR OWN RISK. Information posted on this forum is not reviewed for accuracy and may not be reliable, use at your own risk. Please review the full WARNING & DISCLAIMER about information on this site.