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#271685 - 09/18/14 12:24 AM Re: Bikes, scooters, etc - alt. forms of transpiration [Re: Bingley]
hikermor Offline
Geezer in Chief
Geezer

Registered: 08/26/06
Posts: 7658
Loc: southern Cal
I am not in the market,but I am sure there are cheaper versions , especially if one is handy with a torch.
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#271686 - 09/18/14 12:34 AM Re: Bikes, scooters, etc - alt. forms of transpiration [Re: Bingley]
UTAlumnus Offline
Old Hand

Registered: 03/08/03
Posts: 1007
Loc: East Tennessee near Bristol
Part of the extra cost is because they put the cargo between the rider and the front forks. They have to have a complex mechanism to be able to steer the front wheel.

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#271687 - 09/18/14 01:18 AM Re: Bikes, scooters, etc - alt. forms of transpiration [Re: Bingley]
Russ Offline
Geezer

Registered: 06/02/06
Posts: 5341
Loc: SOCAL
Hmm, I'm not convinced the weight forward designs are all that good. I prefer to have weight over the rear wheel. Check out the Surly Bikes Big Dummy .

But rather than a dedicated cargo bike, I'd much rather have an excellent road bike that can carry cargo -- something like the Surly Long Haul Trucker.

My 20-something year old mountain bike was built the old fashioned way, Cro-Moly steel with lots of braze ons. I've had a rack over the rear wheel and a small pack on the handlebars. Nothing that upsets the balance. It could easily take a set of panniers to carry more stuff. If I needed to carry more than that I'd start looking at trailers...

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#271688 - 09/18/14 02:19 AM Re: Bikes, scooters, etc - alt. forms of transpiration [Re: Bingley]
AKSAR Offline
Veteran

Registered: 08/31/11
Posts: 1217
Loc: Alaska
Originally Posted By: Bingley
I didn't realize cargo bikes cost thousands of dollars. Is this normal, or have I just stumbled upon a site for a particular sort of consumer?
See an overview of cargo bikes and an review of some cargo bikes.

There appears to be lots of different designs for different purposes and different preferences. How much weight do you want to carry? Bulky and odd shaped stuff or small and compact loads. Will you ride big hills or mostly flatland?
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#271693 - 09/18/14 02:51 PM Re: Bikes, scooters, etc - alt. forms of transpiration [Re: Russ]
hikermor Offline
Geezer in Chief
Geezer

Registered: 08/26/06
Posts: 7658
Loc: southern Cal
I have been riding a Surly LHT for several years and I am very pleased with it - very versatile and useful. I'll bet their other models are pretty good, as well.

In a pinch, almost any bike will work, especially if you keep the tires inflated. (You read it first here on ETS.)
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#271700 - 09/19/14 12:51 AM Re: Bikes, scooters, etc - alt. forms of transpiration [Re: Russ]
Jolt Offline
Journeyman

Registered: 11/15/10
Posts: 90
Loc: Maine
Originally Posted By: Russ
Hmm, I'm not convinced the weight forward designs are all that good. I prefer to have weight over the rear wheel. Check out the Surly Bikes Big Dummy .

But rather than a dedicated cargo bike, I'd much rather have an excellent road bike that can carry cargo -- something like the Surly Long Haul Trucker.

My 20-something year old mountain bike was built the old fashioned way, Cro-Moly steel with lots of braze ons. I've had a rack over the rear wheel and a small pack on the handlebars. Nothing that upsets the balance. It could easily take a set of panniers to carry more stuff. If I needed to carry more than that I'd start looking at trailers...


+1 on the Surly LHT...excellent bike. I managed to find a used one on Craigslist this spring that was my size and it is now my all-purpose bike (aside from trails, I have an old mountain bike for those rides). So far the biggest loads I have had on it have been 30 pounds of groceries...rides nicely with the weight and could handle much more, especially if I installed a front rack in addition to the one on the rear. Also can take fairly fat tires, even with fenders, so you're not limited to skinny tires and perfect roads. I haven't ridden any of Surly's other models but they all look good. There are a few (Troll/Ogre/ECR) that look like they would make good off-road touring/camping rigs. As far as cargo bikes go, there's a company called Xtracycle that makes a kit you can use to convert a regular bike (like, say, that old steel MTB) into a longtail cargo bike. Check it out...http://www.xtracycle.com/freeradical-x1. Much less expensive than buying a ready-made cargo bike.


Edited by Jolt (09/19/14 12:55 AM)
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#300414 - 11/26/21 03:33 PM Re: Bikes, scooters, etc - alt. forms of transpiration [Re: TeacherRO]
LCranston Offline
2
Enthusiast

Registered: 08/31/09
Posts: 201
Loc: Nebraska
Was searching for Christmas presents for 12 yr old and came across an interesting twist- Electric Skateboards..

Lithium Battery Skateboards with a range estimate of 11-12 miles started at under 200.00..
As a get home vehicle, Small, portable, 11 miles at 20 Mph without any kicking, probably more if you have downhill stretches, and functional as a regular skateboard when the battery dies.

Thoughts, comments?

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#300419 - 11/26/21 05:24 PM Re: Bikes, scooters, etc - alt. forms of transpiration [Re: LCranston]
Tjin Offline
Pooh-Bah

Registered: 04/08/02
Posts: 1813
Originally Posted By: LCranston
Was searching for Christmas presents for 12 yr old and came across an interesting twist- Electric Skateboards..

Lithium Battery Skateboards with a range estimate of 11-12 miles started at under 200.00..
As a get home vehicle, Small, portable, 11 miles at 20 Mph without any kicking, probably more if you have downhill stretches, and functional as a regular skateboard when the battery dies.

Thoughts, comments?


European here. One of the organisations that tested a stack of those, failed all of them due to their unsafe batteries.

Also skateboards need a decent surface.
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#300420 - 11/26/21 11:10 PM Re: Bikes, scooters, etc - alt. forms of transpiration [Re: TeacherRO]
Ren Offline
Addict

Registered: 11/05/07
Posts: 429
Loc: Wales, UK
Probably better with an electric scooter. Actually see tradesmen using them in places like London. Where they have trouble parking their van near the client, so use a scooter to travel back and for the van.


Edited by Ren (11/27/21 12:05 AM)

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#300441 - 11/29/21 05:08 PM Re: Bikes, scooters, etc - alt. forms of transpiration [Re: Jolt]
amper Offline
Enthusiast

Registered: 07/06/02
Posts: 228
Loc: US
Originally Posted By: Jolt
Originally Posted By: Russ
Hmm, I'm not convinced the weight forward designs are all that good. I prefer to have weight over the rear wheel. Check out the Surly Bikes Big Dummy .

But rather than a dedicated cargo bike, I'd much rather have an excellent road bike that can carry cargo -- something like the Surly Long Haul Trucker.

My 20-something year old mountain bike was built the old fashioned way, Cro-Moly steel with lots of braze ons. I've had a rack over the rear wheel and a small pack on the handlebars. Nothing that upsets the balance. It could easily take a set of panniers to carry more stuff. If I needed to carry more than that I'd start looking at trailers...


+1 on the Surly LHT...excellent bike. I managed to find a used one on Craigslist this spring that was my size and it is now my all-purpose bike (aside from trails, I have an old mountain bike for those rides). So far the biggest loads I have had on it have been 30 pounds of groceries...rides nicely with the weight and could handle much more, especially if I installed a front rack in addition to the one on the rear. Also can take fairly fat tires, even with fenders, so you're not limited to skinny tires and perfect roads. I haven't ridden any of Surly's other models but they all look good. There are a few (Troll/Ogre/ECR) that look like they would make good off-road touring/camping rigs. As far as cargo bikes go, there's a company called Xtracycle that makes a kit you can use to convert a regular bike (like, say, that old steel MTB) into a longtail cargo bike. Check it out...http://www.xtracycle.com/freeradical-x1. Much less expensive than buying a ready-made cargo bike.



I'm a big fan of Surly. One of these days, I may even get around to building up the 1x1 frame and fork set that's been collecting dust in my house for about 15 years.


Edited by amper (11/29/21 05:26 PM)
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