Equipped To Survive Equipped To Survive® Presents
The Survival Forum
Where do you want to go on ETS?

Page 1 of 4 1 2 3 4 >
Topic Options
#294117 - 11/08/19 06:31 PM Also, that's probably too much paracord...
teacher Offline
Old Hand

Registered: 12/14/05
Posts: 812
I've seen kits with 50-100' of paracord.

Top
#294119 - 11/08/19 07:12 PM Re: Also, that's probably too much paracord... [Re: teacher]
hikermor Offline
Geezer in Chief
Geezer

Registered: 08/26/06
Posts: 7054
Loc: southern Cal
Agree, that is probably excessive. I like paracord that includes a flammable strand for fire starting. Usually in my kits, it is precut for tarp fastening, etc. into lengths about three feet or so.
_________________________
Geezer in Chief

Top
#294120 - 11/08/19 08:47 PM Re: Also, that's probably too much paracord... [Re: teacher]
Jeanette_Isabelle Offline
Pooh-Bah

Registered: 11/13/06
Posts: 2201
Loc: Somewhere in Florida
I don't know what you consider too much. Doug Ritter includes 100' of paracord in his Aviator Survival Pack.

Jeanette Isabelle
_________________________
“Trust me, this is not gonna end well!” — Pleakley, Lilo & Stitch

Top
#294121 - 11/08/19 09:29 PM Re: Also, that's probably too much paracord... [Re: Jeanette_Isabelle]
hikermor Offline
Geezer in Chief
Geezer

Registered: 08/26/06
Posts: 7054
Loc: southern Cal
It really depends upon the situation and circumstances. Generally, if I have 100 feet of anything, it would be at least 9mm diameter climbing rope which often has come in handy for me in the past. Sometimes even that is not adequate.
_________________________
Geezer in Chief

Top
#294122 - 11/08/19 10:46 PM Re: Also, that's probably too much paracord... [Re: hikermor]
Alan_Romania Offline

Addict

Registered: 06/29/05
Posts: 618
Loc: Arizona
Originally Posted By: hikermor
It really depends upon the situation and circumstances.
Couldn't have said it better myself!

I keep Type 1 and Type 3 paracord in my various kits. In some kits I have both, some just one or the other. In my truck I keep 300' of type 1 and 100' of type 3. It takes up very little space and while not insignificant it doesn't weigh much.
_________________________
"Trust in God --and press-check. You cannot ignore danger and call it faith." -Duke

Top
#294123 - 11/08/19 11:36 PM Re: Also, that's probably too much paracord... [Re: teacher]
Phaedrus Offline
Pooh-Bah

Registered: 04/28/10
Posts: 2422
Loc: Big Sky Country
I guess it depends on the size of the kit. For me if we're talking a wilderness PSK about the minimum I'd go with is 20'-25'. Much less is asking for trouble IMO. 50' is not overkill but I don't think I'd often need 100.

My main use for cordage in a PSK is to build a shelter, normally a large mylar blanket into a lean-to or plow-point configuration. My AO is the forests of ID and MT, so most of the time I'll be pitching a tarp with a ridgeline running between two trees. Since God doesn't plant them with ridgeline spacing in mind I sometimes need more cord, sometimes less. If I have trekking poles along it's a bit easier and I don't need a ridgeline, just guylines.

So if I'm pitching a shelter and then to lash anything that 25' of cord can start getting used up.
_________________________
“You can tell whether a man is clever by his answers. You can tell whether a man is wise by his questions.” Naguib Mahfouz

Top
#294125 - 11/09/19 12:43 AM Re: Also, that's probably too much paracord... [Re: teacher]
dougwalkabout Offline
Crazy Canuck
Carpal Tunnel

Registered: 02/03/07
Posts: 2762
Loc: Alberta, Canada
100' is, like any rope, either too long or too short. It's hardly outrageous. As noted above, it depends on the purpose of the kit, the terrain, and the anticipated circumstances.

It could be quadrupled to help get a quad or small vehicle out of a rut. That eats up footage in a hurry, especially when you add knots.

Or, a longer line could permit water and warm clothing to be lowered to a person who is trapped on a ledge and awaiting rescue.

Generally speaking, for any backpack kit to be carried on foot, it's absolutely critical that the list-maker take it for a 5-10 mile schlep. This focuses the mind wonderfully, leading to all sorts of efficiencies.

Top
#294127 - 11/09/19 03:34 AM Re: Also, that's probably too much paracord... [Re: dougwalkabout]
hikermor Offline
Geezer in Chief
Geezer

Registered: 08/26/06
Posts: 7054
Loc: southern Cal
Actually, my favorite small line for rigging shelters,, etc. is mason's braided twine, which is available in reflective colors. It's lighter than paracord, and adequately strong. Paracord makes great zipper pulls (patterns have been posted by Tony E) and you have the flammable strand for emergency fire starting, at least with the paracord I prefer.

If you are unsticking vehicles, you probably are best off with a chain. On one occasion, I broke a good climbing rope pulling a vehicle across a stream. Pretty spectacular failure. Do stand to the side if you ever attempt this.
_________________________
Geezer in Chief

Top
#294129 - 11/09/19 04:40 AM Re: Also, that's probably too much paracord... [Re: teacher]
Phaedrus Offline
Pooh-Bah

Registered: 04/28/10
Posts: 2422
Loc: Big Sky Country
I like tarred bankline (Catahoula brand especially) very well although I do sometimes have the cheaper mason's line. I like paracord better for the ridge line though because I like the way it works in conjunction with tarred bankline (a Catahoula Prussik knot holds very well in paracord, and my repertoire of knots could be better! blush). Definitely you can get 100' of bank line or mason's line in the space of 25' of paracord.
_________________________
“You can tell whether a man is clever by his answers. You can tell whether a man is wise by his questions.” Naguib Mahfouz

Top
#294131 - 11/09/19 05:09 AM Re: Also, that's probably too much paracord... [Re: hikermor]
dougwalkabout Offline
Crazy Canuck
Carpal Tunnel

Registered: 02/03/07
Posts: 2762
Loc: Alberta, Canada
Originally Posted By: hikermor
If you are unsticking vehicles, you probably are best off with a chain. On one occasion, I broke a good climbing rope pulling a vehicle across a stream. Pretty spectacular failure. Do stand to the side if you ever attempt this.


To clarify, paracord has no magical qualities. It can be a last-ditch bridge material for a small vehicle that only needs a mild tug, and the cord will be destroyed in the process. In that situation, give me a nylon strap any day. But sometimes you use what you have.

(And wow, aren't we consistently easy targets for teacher's regular stirring-the-pot routine? If it adds value, though ...)

Top
Page 1 of 4 1 2 3 4 >



Moderator:  Alan_Romania, Blast, cliff, Hikin_Jim 
November
Su M Tu W Th F Sa
1 2
3 4 5 6 7 8 9
10 11 12 13 14 15 16
17 18 19 20 21 22 23
24 25 26 27 28 29 30
Who's Online
0 registered (), 237 Guests and 3 Spiders online.
Key: Admin, Global Mod, Mod
Newest Members
SimonBlack88, KnifePark, Sank, AppalachianGirl, BereniceStanaway
5298 Registered Users
Newest Posts
Advice on small, "realistic" car emergency kit
by Burncycle
03:14 AM
Tucked Bowline Tutorial - lanyard, zipper pull, et
by TonyE
11:25 PM
Ashley's Bend (a.k.a. ABOK 1452) tutorial
by Phaedrus
05:22 AM
A little humor for all those SAR volunteers
by clearwater
04:23 AM
20 x Energizer Ultimate L91 AA @ Costco $13.99
by Phaedrus
01:08 AM
Survival in the snow -- At a Terrible Cost
by Phaedrus
01:06 AM
Survival in the snow -- Happy Ending
by Phaedrus
01:01 AM
Lark's Head Loop tutorial - lanyard, zipper pull
by TonyE
11/16/19 05:12 AM
Newest Images
Tiny knife / wrench
Handmade knives
2"x2" Glass Signal Mirror, Retroreflective Mesh
Trade School Tool Kit
My Pocket Kit
Glossary
Test

WARNING & DISCLAIMER: SELECT AND USE OUTDOORS AND SURVIVAL EQUIPMENT, SUPPLIES AND TECHNIQUES AT YOUR OWN RISK. Information posted on this forum is not reviewed for accuracy and may not be reliable, use at your own risk. Please review the full WARNING & DISCLAIMER about information on this site.