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#237821 - 12/23/11 12:58 AM Re: Survival Blankets [Re: Crowe]
Byrd_Huntr Offline
Old Hand

Registered: 01/28/10
Posts: 1174
Loc: MN, Land O' Lakes & Rivers ...
Originally Posted By: Crowe
This guy has come up with a solution to the problem, of course, he uses three space blankets and a tripod, still, I like it.


Not criticizing, as he has a pretty good setup.

With the high profile and completely open front, I just wonder what the effect of shifting winds would be. I also question the temperature differential between the peak of the shelter and the ground where his feet are. I don't think you can overstate the need to keep your feet warm in winter survival situations.

I have tried various materials and configurations in my winter camps and I believe that a shelter configured from the same materials, but low and horizontial in front of a fire with a log or stone reflector opposing would be more wind resistant and have a more consistant temperature inside.

I have not been in a true survival situation in winter, but to prepare, I carry a folding saw. a nylon poncho, 50 ft of 550, a silver sheet, and an orange AMK double sized sheet. The nylon poncho with a sapling frame is the shelter, lined inside with the silver reflector sheet, and then a bed of leaves, grass, or pine needles, I would wrap up in the heatsheet in front of the fire.
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#237865 - 12/23/11 01:08 PM Re: Survival Blankets [Re: bacpacjac]
bacpacjac Offline
Carpal Tunnel

Registered: 05/05/07
Posts: 3601
Loc: Ontario, Canada
I like Dave Canterbury's set up here. It's easy to construct, even if your blankets don't have gromets (I use small rocks and some paracord at the corners). In cold weater, you're going to want that pad to stop heat loss into the ground. The configuration he's showing here works better with a steeper pitch to the roof if there's a chance of snow and you're also going to want to put rocks, logs or snow on the ground edges to stop drafts:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?feature=player_embedded&v=pQLVUFTpUOk
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#237866 - 12/23/11 01:34 PM Re: Survival Blankets [Re: bacpacjac]
hikermor Offline
Geezer in Chief
Geezer

Registered: 08/26/06
Posts: 7191
Loc: southern Cal
Have you had any experience with the rock/paracord tie-ins during significant wind? I plan to use tarps or blankets in a similar fashion and I have always wonder how well they will hold when it gets breezy...

A question that easily comes to mind. We are experiencing Santa Ana winds today........
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#237869 - 12/23/11 01:51 PM Re: Survival Blankets [Re: hikermor]
bacpacjac Offline
Carpal Tunnel

Registered: 05/05/07
Posts: 3601
Loc: Ontario, Canada
Originally Posted By: hikermor
Have you had any experience with the rock/paracord tie-ins during significant wind? I plan to use tarps or blankets in a similar fashion and I have always wonder how well they will hold when it gets breezy...

A question that easily comes to mind. We are experiencing Santa Ana winds today........
.

I haven't tried to put rock/paracord tie-ins together in seriously high winds or severe cold. I expect that finger dexterity would be an issue in that case, so preparing the tie-ins before would be prudent. (Thank goodness it's only an emergency shelter for me.) I have noticed that once they're together they stay pretty taut as long as you make your knots tight and secure. I've only tested the set up a few times so others with more experience may have a better perspective.
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#237970 - 12/25/11 03:18 AM Re: Survival Blankets [Re: hikermor]
aloha Offline
Old Hand

Registered: 11/16/05
Posts: 1047
Loc: Hawaii, USA
Originally Posted By: hikermor
Have you had any experience with the rock/paracord tie-ins during significant wind? I plan to use tarps or blankets in a similar fashion and I have always wonder how well they will hold when it gets breezy...

A question that easily comes to mind. We are experiencing Santa Ana winds today........



It's gets pretty windy where I often camp and it has caused equipment damage before.

My friend uses the blue and/or silver heavy duty tarps at camp and in high winds, the grommets rip out. I have used the pebble approach on his same tarp and the winds didn't damage the tarps further.

My conclusion is the pebble or whatever in the tarp has been more reliable and flexible than grommets, just not as convenient. When I use the grommets in wind, I will sometimes use a loop of bungee cord ala the USMC tarp. That gives some give to hopefully reduce damage.

But with a space blanket, the weak part is the blanket itself. And the wrapped pebble or grasses or whatever you put in there approach would probably be the strongest way to do it. My disclaimer is that while I have used tarps a lot in high wind, I have never tried a survival blanket in high wind.

I have seen tarp setups survive where the EZ Up type canopies have had their frames twisted and broken by the wind.
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#237984 - 12/25/11 09:15 PM Re: Survival Blankets [Re: bacpacjac]
Leigh_Ratcliffe Offline
Veteran

Registered: 03/31/06
Posts: 1355
Loc: United Kingdom.
Originally Posted By: bacpacjac
I like Dave Canterbury's set up here. It's easy to construct, even if your blankets don't have gromets (I use small rocks and some paracord at the corners). In cold weater, you're going to want that pad to stop heat loss into the ground. The configuration he's showing here works better with a steeper pitch to the roof if there's a chance of snow and you're also going to want to put rocks, logs or snow on the ground edges to stop drafts:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?feature=player_embedded&v=pQLVUFTpUOk



Just one quick observation: With the SPACE blankets clipping a couple of small non climbing carabiners into the eyelets enables you to loop your 550 cord as prussiks without having to mess around untying and retying things. A serious consideration when you need to get that shelter up in a hurry. Probably cut two min off the erection time.
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#237985 - 12/25/11 10:51 PM Re: Survival Blankets [Re: Leigh_Ratcliffe]
bacpacjac Offline
Carpal Tunnel

Registered: 05/05/07
Posts: 3601
Loc: Ontario, Canada
Originally Posted By: Leigh_Ratcliffe
Originally Posted By: bacpacjac
I like Dave Canterbury's set up here. It's easy to construct, even if your blankets don't have gromets (I use small rocks and some paracord at the corners). In cold weater, you're going to want that pad to stop heat loss into the ground. The configuration he's showing here works better with a steeper pitch to the roof if there's a chance of snow and you're also going to want to put rocks, logs or snow on the ground edges to stop drafts:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?feature=player_embedded&v=pQLVUFTpUOk



Just one quick observation: With the SPACE blankets clipping a couple of small non climbing carabiners into the eyelets enables you to loop your 550 cord as prussiks without having to mess around untying and retying things. A serious consideration when you need to get that shelter up in a hurry. Probably cut two min off the erection time.


Great idea Leigh. If I carried space blankets with tarps, I'd probably pre-tie them and adding carabins to them makes a lot of sense. Eliminating finicky work with cold fingers is high on the priority list. In fact, giving that it's winter here now, I'll consider doing just that. Thanks!
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#238021 - 12/26/11 07:45 PM Re: Survival Blankets [Re: bacpacjac]
Teslinhiker Offline
Veteran

Registered: 12/14/09
Posts: 1401
Loc: Cranbrook BC (Finally)
Slight thread hijack...

The Thermarest RidgeRest sleeping pad seen in the above video link is a great product and has been my main sleeping pad for a quite awhile now. After using this pad, I will never go back to the Zotefoam type sleeping pads.



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#238029 - 12/27/11 01:33 AM Re: Survival Blankets [Re: bacpacjac]
bacpacjac Offline
Carpal Tunnel

Registered: 05/05/07
Posts: 3601
Loc: Ontario, Canada
LOVE my thermarest! I was thinking of picking up a ridge rest for day hikes, instead of taking the pro lite, which is part of my long hike pack-GHB.

Actually, come to think of it. We have two ridge rests somewhere. hmmm.. a treasure hunt before DS and I go hiking tomorrow it is!


Edited by bacpacjac (12/27/11 01:57 AM)
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#238030 - 12/27/11 02:08 AM Re: Survival Blankets [Re: bacpacjac]
Teslinhiker Offline
Veteran

Registered: 12/14/09
Posts: 1401
Loc: Cranbrook BC (Finally)
The Prolites are good. My SO has the Prolite Plus Women's model which has a higher R value due to a bit more insulation in the lower and foot part of the mattress. She swears by the sleeping pad and has logged plenty of nights of comfortable sleep on it over the last couple of years.

I don't have a Prolite but instead, use a MEC Kelvin model non-insulated air pad. The Kelvin models are no longer made but I have had mine now for about 3 years with no problems and no leaks. Like the Prolites, the Kelvin rolls up very compact and is not much taller in height then a Nalgene bottle.

_________________________
Earth and sky, woods and fields, lakes and rivers, the mountain and the sea, are excellent schoolmasters, and teach some of us more than we can ever learn from books.

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