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#219694 - 03/18/11 06:12 PM Re: Why carry a wood stove? [Re: Hikin_Jim]
Am_Fear_Liath_Mor Offline
Carpal Tunnel

Registered: 08/03/07
Posts: 3078
Why anyone would pay £60 not including delivery and tax to the UK for a Bushbuddy is beyond me when you can make one with just access to an electric drill or dremel tool and have the right tin cans.



Lidl (UK discount store) Dried Skimmed Milk Tin (£1.89) and a Freshona Tin of New Potatoes (£0.26)





Yep a perfect mechanical fit and no sharp edges with a good can opener (Kuhn Rikon Safety LidLifters Auto Safety Lidlifter). The Basis for a wood gasifier stove. wink

All that needs to be done is to drill some holes in the base of the Milbona Can and at the bottom of the Freshona can (to form a grate) and then again at the top end etc. Weight is around 160gms.

If it corrodes into dust or you cannot be bothered to clean up the improvised wood stove you just make another one (takes about 10 minutes)

There is not much to the Bushbuddy.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XdwoYrRkf0k

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#219704 - 03/18/11 06:55 PM Re: Why carry a wood stove? [Re: Hikin_Jim]
juhirvon Offline
Newbie

Registered: 03/09/11
Posts: 36
Here's another cheaper-than-dirt wood burning "stove" that weights less than any commercial model I've seen, and can compete with the top 10 on speed.

The wall-part is my pot stand/wind shield for my usual alcohol stove (made from an old can), and the bottom is a stainless steel lid from an old candy jar. Total weight, 40g. Total cost, 5 minutes of work.



-jh

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#219729 - 03/18/11 08:01 PM Re: Why carry a wood stove? [Re: CANOEDOGS]
Hikin_Jim Offline
Sheriff
Pooh-Bah

Registered: 10/12/07
Posts: 1804
Loc: Southern California
Originally Posted By: CANOEDOGS
people don't know how to make a real wood fire these days so they want a gizmo to help them along.a wood fire that really burns hot,stays lit and provides a bed of hot coals is just about a lost art in the age of self lighting-turn the knob stoves.
That reminds me, are there any wood stoves with piezo-electric ignition? wink

HJ
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#219731 - 03/18/11 08:08 PM Re: Why carry a wood stove? [Re: hikermor]
Hikin_Jim Offline
Sheriff
Pooh-Bah

Registered: 10/12/07
Posts: 1804
Loc: Southern California
Originally Posted By: hikermor
The paradox is that fire making is a really essential survival skill, but is a practice with significant ecological consequences. How do you stay proficient in a rarely used skill? I guess that is why more and more of us carry handy dandy lighters, tinder, and fire starters.
Yeah, that's about the size of it.

When I first started backpacking, we cooked with a coffee can with a long wire looped as a bail through holes poked in the sides of the can. We had to pick spots with wood. My job as a boy was to gather fire wood, which was time consuming even with dad doing camp set up and me gathering wood.

The plus side is that I learned how to make a fire from a guy who really knew how to make fires. Dad started hiking in the 30's and 40's. By the time I came around in the 60's, he had already been cooking on wood fires for a couple of decades. Relying on a wood fire for your food definitely increases your motivation, and repetition really gets it down to a science.

HJ
_________________________
Adventures In Stoving

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#219732 - 03/18/11 08:11 PM Re: Why carry a wood stove? [Re: Mark_F]
Hikin_Jim Offline
Sheriff
Pooh-Bah

Registered: 10/12/07
Posts: 1804
Loc: Southern California
Originally Posted By: Mark_Frantom
Almost sounds like our cub-scout troop should be learning about stoves rather than how to make a fire.
Well, hopefully both.

Fire does scar the land (or can), and gathering wood in high altitude or heavily visited areas can really strip the land, so fires on a regular basis aren't all that great of an idea. But in areas where you won't leave much of an impact (areas with fire pits or remote areas) and where there's plenty of wood, it's a good skill to have for survival purposes.

HJ
_________________________
Adventures In Stoving

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#219736 - 03/18/11 08:50 PM Re: Why carry a wood stove? [Re: Hikin_Jim]
jzmtl Offline
Addict

Registered: 03/18/10
Posts: 530
Loc: Montreal Canada
Mostly efficiency I'd imagine, at least for me if I were to carry one. I've never used wood stove for actual cooking but have made a wood gasification stove with a gallon paint can. In my test boil, for the amount of wood it consumes, there's no way you can boil the water with an open fire.

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#219752 - 03/18/11 11:38 PM Re: Why carry a wood stove? [Re: Hikin_Jim]
Dagny Offline
Pooh-Bah

Registered: 11/25/08
Posts: 1916
Loc: Washington, DC

I keep a Kelly Kettle in my SUV and one in my teardrop trailer. If I run out of JetBoil fuel on a camp trip it'll be handy. If I'm stranded in the car somewhere, it'll be very handy.

The Vargo Hexagon is now in my backpack for day hikes. Weighs hardly anything and is an efficient means of building a little fire with little found fuel and it will hold a Titanium mug (which I also routinely carry) or small pot. I won't carry a fuel canister on a day hike. In winter, I might carry a thermos of hot coffee or cocoa.

Makes perfect sense to me.

Am also now in the habit of carrying a Bic lighter, matches and firesteel.

Just in case.

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#219763 - 03/19/11 04:19 AM Re: Why carry a wood stove? [Re: Hikin_Jim]
CANOEDOGS Offline
Pooh-Bah

Registered: 02/03/07
Posts: 1838
Loc: MINNESOTA
a good source of plans for making tin can wood stoves is any 1940-50-early 60's camping book."tin can cooking" was all the rave for awhile.it started as a cheap way to make camping gear and went on to be a "hobby hobo" item and finely counter culture reject of store bought gear....i have no idea of what it's morphed into now.

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#219764 - 03/19/11 05:14 AM Re: Why carry a wood stove? [Re: CANOEDOGS]
juhirvon Offline
Newbie

Registered: 03/09/11
Posts: 36
Originally Posted By: CANOEDOGS
it started as a cheap way to make camping gear and went on to be a "hobby hobo" item and finely counter culture reject of store bought gear....i have no idea of what it's morphed into now.


Ultralight™ backpacking gear.

-jh

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#219775 - 03/19/11 02:46 PM Re: Why carry a wood stove? [Re: Hikin_Jim]
JerryFountain Offline
Addict

Registered: 12/06/07
Posts: 418
Loc: St. Petersburg, Florida
Since this thread started because of HJ's question to me I suppose it would be nice for me to make a comment or two (plus, how can I refrain from commenting on an interesting topic?). Juhirvon gave a quick rundown on the advantages of a wood stove.

Every day in the field for the first 20+ years I built a squaw wood fire (dead pine branches from the lower part of a living tree) to, as one of my mentors called it in his New England accent "boil the noon kettle". In the Rockies of the time it was simply a matter of taking the last couple of minutes before lunch to collect a double handful of wood no larger than your thumb, gathering 3 rocks and in 5 min or so the kettle was boiling. By the time lunch was over, the fire was out and cool, a little water and turning the rocks over and placing them where they were in the first place. As I began to travel and work in other areas - particularly the Antarctic and the tundra of Alaska a stove became necessary and a 123 became a regular part of my kit. The use of fire in the Rockies was becomming less favorable and I began to use the stove there as well. I later added an XGK for travel for the fuel availablilty, but used the 123 (and now a Pocket Rocket) for day trips and light overnights.

I still think there are many times where a contained wood fire is OK and I prefer the sounds, smells and ambiance of a wood fire. My thoughts on a wood stove (and I have little experience with one) like a canteen cup stove or the Vargo is that I could use it more often than a rock circle and with less cleanup. That would be a + in my mind. I brought it up here because I can always get good information from the group to help with such decisions.

Respectfully,

Jerry

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