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#200180 - 04/14/10 11:36 PM DIXON ROLLERPACK
falcon5000 Offline
Addict

Registered: 09/08/05
Posts: 662
Here is a interesting idea that I ran across, it has some good as well as some bad attributes. The price he wants for this thing is very high but the idea is sound. Wouldn't be hard to make but I have read about a lot of parks prohibit these on the trail but studies say that it does not harm the trails. There is a law that prohibits mechanical devices used in park areas including dear carts, dollies, etc. Any thoughts? Do a Google for DIXON ROLLER PACK reviews.

http://dixonrollerpack.com/18148.html

Video

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=oAAEn1qR1qw

This is not me..........




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#200181 - 04/14/10 11:41 PM Re: DIXON ROLLERPACK [Re: falcon5000]
clearwater Offline
Old Hand

Registered: 03/19/05
Posts: 1031
Loc: Channeled Scablands
Wilderness areas do not allow mechanical stuff like wheels.

Don't know about all parks.

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#200182 - 04/15/10 12:18 AM Re: DIXON ROLLERPACK [Re: falcon5000]
hikermor Offline
Geezer in Chief
Geezer

Registered: 08/26/06
Posts: 6433
Loc: southern Cal
If I understand their site correctly, the maximum recommended load is only 100 pounds and the normal rig is designed for 50 pounds. That's not nearly enough. Many folks backpack routinely with 50 pound loads, although it is better to be lighter.

I note they do not give the weight of the conveyance itself. It looks heavy, somewhere between seven and ten pounds (I am guessing).

It certainly has possibilities. I have used enough wheeled Stokes litters to believe that the wheel is here to stay and is indeed a good invention. But I am not standing in line to get one.
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#200185 - 04/15/10 12:49 AM Re: DIXON ROLLERPACK [Re: hikermor]
Nicodemus Offline
Paranoid?
Veteran

Registered: 10/30/05
Posts: 1341
Loc: Virginia, US
I like the idea, unfortunately the site looks like a home job and it is somewhat confusing. It's all over the place.

There is weight information for a 7.5 pound rig capable of carrying 50 pounds and 9.5 pound rig for a 100 pound load. The 50 pound Rollerpack comes with the bag and costs $295.00. The 100 pound Rollerpack is the same price but doesn't come with a bag.





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#200186 - 04/15/10 12:54 AM Re: DIXON ROLLERPACK [Re: falcon5000]
Am_Fear_Liath_Mor Offline
Carpal Tunnel

Registered: 08/03/07
Posts: 3077
My granny used to have something similar for getting her messages back from the shops in the 1970s, but it had 2 wheels and was therefore was a lot more stable. It also came kitted out in an advanced digicam camouflage fabric. wink


Edited by Am_Fear_Liath_Mor (04/15/10 01:07 AM)

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#200193 - 04/15/10 03:30 AM Re: DIXON ROLLERPACK [Re: Am_Fear_Liath_Mor]
haertig Offline
Pooh-Bah

Registered: 03/13/05
Posts: 1999
Loc: Colorado
It would be a nightmare to hike through the Rocky Mountains dragging that thing. I used "dragging" literally, because it won't be "rolling" over the rocks we have here. It might be good on a paved street, but a car would be even better for that job.

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#200195 - 04/15/10 06:14 AM Re: DIXON ROLLERPACK [Re: haertig]
MostlyHarmless Offline
Old Hand

Registered: 06/03/09
Posts: 982
Loc: Norway
I can imagine a lot of areas where the ground is flat and solid enough for the wheel to do its work - like the terrain shown in those pictures.

On the other hand, most places a wheel won't work at all. It will sink into mud, marshes, sand and will get stuck, pinched and abused by rocks, logs and sticks.

Actually, the wheel thingy should work just fine anywhere you can ride a bicycle without being a die-hard offroad racing expert. In my neck of the woods, you usually can't ride cross country except on good trails.


The 50 pound version is just a waste of good building materials, IMO - at least it would be for me. 50 pounds is the upper limit of what I consider reasonable for a backpack (I try to stay below that, but I have no worries with 50 pounds). The 100 pound version is more interesting. I have a very good backpack made for that kind of loads, but my knees are eternal grateful that I never load it up with 100 pounds. (I've been pretty close, but only very short distances - typically going a few miles from the car to the cabin loaded with wine and food). I see a similar purpose for this one - hauling loads a few miles from your car to your base camp or cabin on a "bike capable" kind of track. Is that worth the stiff price tag? Not in my world, but each to his own.


This thing made me think about travois kind of sledges, which I only know from Wild West stories. Anybody tried something similar?


Oh, and in the winter time you definitively want a pulk to haul heavy gear on the snow. Unlike this rollerpack, pulks have a track record of probably several thousands years. But pulks require snow to work properly.

EDIT 1: My initial comments may have been a bit too harsh. Getting that pack off your back is a great relief, even if it's not overly heavy (< 50 pounds) and a comfortable pack. Particular in hot weather. The "bike friendly terrain" limitation will be unacceptable for me, though.

EDIT 2: I checked their web site, and see they have a "ski attachment accessory" for this contraption... which is a foot long ski that takes over the job of the wheel. I have a hard time seeing how this would not interfere with your own snow shoes or skis. But can't blame 'em for trying.


Edited by MostlyHarmless (04/15/10 07:51 AM)

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#200202 - 04/15/10 12:38 PM Re: DIXON ROLLERPACK [Re: MostlyHarmless]
Eugene Offline
Carpal Tunnel

Registered: 12/26/02
Posts: 2822
A larger daimeter wheel would help, think mountain bike wheel/tire 26" or 700c. Larger daimerter wheel will roll over rocks easier than a smaller diameter one. Look at the wheels on deer carts.

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#200205 - 04/15/10 12:42 PM Re: DIXON ROLLERPACK [Re: MostlyHarmless]
billvann Offline
Old Hand

Registered: 05/10/01
Posts: 780
Loc: NE Illinois, USA (42:19:08N 08...
There's a lengthy discussion on the product on the Hammocks Forum. Also, Arrowhead Equipment is a distributor of the Roller Pack & Ski. No difference in the price but he also sells other camping and hammock gear so you can add other items that you might want or need and save on shipping/handling charges from separate vendors. I have no affiliate with Arrowhead except I've bought my KAQ underquilt and other products from Paul. His workmanship is tops and is only exceeded by his customer service.

BTW, Paul uses the roller Pack and has been in conversation with the comany on making some modifications. (Hammock folks are always into making mods!) I'm sure Paul will be happy to honestly answer any questions you have about the product.

BTW II, I digress but I recently picked up his Super Dinner Bivy for freezer bag cooking. I haven't tested mine yet but Paul's tests show it retains heat for rehydration for a very long time.
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McHenry, IL

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#200206 - 04/15/10 01:04 PM Re: DIXON ROLLERPACK [Re: Eugene]
Nicodemus Offline
Paranoid?
Veteran

Registered: 10/30/05
Posts: 1341
Loc: Virginia, US
Originally Posted By: Eugene
A larger daimeter wheel would help, think mountain bike wheel/tire 26" or 700c. Larger daimerter wheel will roll over rocks easier than a smaller diameter one. Look at the wheels on deer carts.


I agree. A larger wheel would be a significant improvement. I wonder if wheel weight or cost was a consideration for the particular wheel chosen.

Actually... Looking at the product again, because they chose to keep the wheel attached in the backpack configuration, the wheel had to be small enough not to impede movement. Which is a nice way of saying the wheel won't hit you in the backside.

I'd think about a larger quick detach bicycle wheel for this pack...


Edited by Nicodemus (04/15/10 01:08 PM)
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