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#123814 - 02/14/08 06:11 AM Re: SUVs and deep water [Re: Susan]
marduk Offline
Member

Registered: 01/25/04
Posts: 160
Loc: Mid-Missouri
One other thing no one has mentioned. If you have to cross water deep enough to submerge your fan, either go VERRRRRY slow or disconnect it (remove the belt or if electric, disconnect the wires) or risk deflecting the fan into the radiator with traumatic results. Yes, I know it can happen (thank goodness not to me). On my old Suburban that we use on the farm and off-road I put on an electric fan with a switch in the cab (also routed vent hoses with care, raised the intake to the cowl vent, and moved the computer and fuse block as high as possible),


Edited by marduk (02/14/08 06:11 AM)
Edit Reason: spelling
_________________________
"Sometimes, it's better to be lucky than skillfull"


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#123818 - 02/14/08 08:37 AM Re: SUVs and deep water [Re: marduk]
xavier01 Offline
Journeyman

Registered: 12/02/02
Posts: 86
Loc: Phx, AZ
If you are traveling through the same washes, some of these already have waterline stakes. Check these when they are dry to verify that they are reporting good measures.


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#123819 - 02/14/08 10:26 AM Re: SUVs and deep water [Re: xavier01]
RayW Offline
Addict

Registered: 12/06/01
Posts: 555
Loc: Orlando, FL
Susan, you might want to check out some of your local 4 wheeler clubs. Find one that travels through the woods, not the ones that just go to a mud hole. I'm sure that they would be happy to trade a little driving knowledge for someone that will lend a hand in getting them unstuck.

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#123830 - 02/14/08 01:55 PM Re: SUVs and deep water [Re: Susan]
SwampDonkey Offline
Veteran

Registered: 07/08/07
Posts: 1268
Loc: Northeastern Ontario, Canada
I drove a Chev pickup truck at work for years (now drive a Ford)and there was a strange thing that happened when I drove through deep water. The front licence plate always ended up getting bent at a right angle near the top, so that it was sticking straight out horizontal. It must have been water pressure from the rear that did this and after every crossing I would have to bend it back down.

Mike

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#123832 - 02/14/08 02:05 PM Re: SUVs and deep water [Re: marduk]
MtnRescue Offline
Newbie

Registered: 12/12/07
Posts: 30
Loc: NoVA
On 4Runners and most Toyota trucks this isn't an issue; the stock fan our vehicles is a clutch fan. The clutch will allow some slip once it's in water so that it won't be damaged or force any of the blades into the radiator. As long as you don't venture too deep for extended periods you'll be fine or else you run the risk of overheating the fan.


Originally Posted By: marduk
One other thing no one has mentioned. If you have to cross water deep enough to submerge your fan, either go VERRRRRY slow or disconnect it (remove the belt or if electric, disconnect the wires) or risk deflecting the fan into the radiator with traumatic results. Yes, I know it can happen (thank goodness not to me). On my old Suburban that we use on the farm and off-road I put on an electric fan with a switch in the cab (also routed vent hoses with care, raised the intake to the cowl vent, and moved the computer and fuse block as high as possible),
_________________________
Wilderness Search and Rescue . . . . smrg.org.

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#123863 - 02/14/08 05:59 PM Re: SUVs and deep water [Re: Arney]
ducktapeguy Offline
Enthusiast

Registered: 03/28/06
Posts: 358
Originally Posted By: Arney
Interesting, purposely creating a bow wave is actually a water fording technique? I had learned a long time ago that a common reason why cars stall in water is because their owners drive too fast, which forces water into the enclosed engine compartment from the front or splashes up from below, which then chokes the air intake, causes electrical issues, etc.


That technique can help when the water level is at or near the level of the air intake, it will actually lower the water level in the engine compartment enough to give you some added space around the air intake. What most people do is throw a tarp in front of the radiator to block off the opening, then drive through the water at a consistant speed to create a wave in front of the vehicle. The tarp will block the water from pushing through the front, and drop the level directly behind it. It's kind of like the eddies that are created behind large rocks in a river, the water level will be lower on the downward side. You don't want to speed through the water to create a big splash, just maintain enough speed to create that wave.

If you're at that point where the water is near your hood level, I'd recommend not driving through it. But it could help in an emergency and you had no other choice and were forced to cross.

As a general rule, I'd drive any car through water level lower than the center of the axles. Above the axles and below the top of the tires I'd start to worry. Anything above the tires I'd be really careful and wouldn't try it unless I was really prepared.




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#123891 - 02/14/08 11:44 PM Re: SUVs and deep water [Re: ]
SwampDonkey Offline
Veteran

Registered: 07/08/07
Posts: 1268
Loc: Northeastern Ontario, Canada
Good advice BigDaddyTX, I do the same thing when travelling on ice roads in the north.

Mike

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#123917 - 02/15/08 12:21 PM Re: SUVs and deep water [Re: SwampDonkey]
Art_in_FL Offline
Pooh-Bah

Registered: 09/01/07
Posts: 2432
If you wade a vehicle too deep you can face the problem of flotation. If the vehicle floats, or even just take sufficient weight off the wheels, you can lose traction and even a weak current can drag you downstream.

One of the advantages of open vehicles, or rusted out ones, is that they let the water in and pretty much prevent the vehicle from floating. The water rises and I have seen people drive by with only their drivers heads and shoulders above water. In that case the air intake was snorkeled so the truck pretty much drove across the bottom with the driver wearing nothing but a swimsuit and an SEG.

Do watch out for currents. The side of most vehicles offers a lot of area for water to press against. Don't underestimate how much force flowing water can produce. A cubic yard of water weighs roughly a ton. A bit of flotation taking pressure off the wheels, a bit of moss on the rocks and a small but steady current can conspire to produce a sleigh ride you can't stop. Sometimes your lucky if you just lose the vehicle and escape with your life.

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#123943 - 02/15/08 03:01 PM Re: SUVs and deep water [Re: Art_in_FL]
SwampDonkey Offline
Veteran

Registered: 07/08/07
Posts: 1268
Loc: Northeastern Ontario, Canada
Good Tip Art,

I have not seen this flotation problem happen in a truck, but I did see it happen to an ATV.

A co-worker of mine stopped his 4 wheeled ATV in a flowing river about 16" deep, and stepped off the bike to have his picture taken. As soon as his weight was off the ATV it started to drift downstream and we all had to scramble to secure it before it dropped into a much deeper adjacent pool.

Mike

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#123946 - 02/15/08 03:25 PM Re: SUVs and deep water [Re: MtnRescue]
Paul810 Offline
Veteran

Registered: 03/02/03
Posts: 1428
Loc: NJ, USA
Originally Posted By: MtnRescue
On 4Runners and most Toyota trucks this isn't an issue; the stock fan our vehicles is a clutch fan. The clutch will allow some slip once it's in water so that it won't be damaged or force any of the blades into the radiator. As long as you don't venture too deep for extended periods you'll be fine or else you run the risk of overheating the fan.


The '06 suburban is the same way; clutch fan. So no issue there.

The newer suburban/yukon uses electric fans, which makes it look pretty funny when you open the hood and see so much open space. It reminds me of trucks from before emmissions and fuel injection. Tons of room under the hood. smile

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