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#5084 - 03/28/02 01:00 PM Re: urban PSK?
Anonymous
Unregistered


I have a couple of walking sticks (as opposed to hiking staffs), one with a large, solid, very heavy brass knob. Many years ago, I even inlet a tiny rounded gem into the side to orient the wood grain by feel.<br><br>Unfortunately, I just feel too silly carrying one. Far from having a limp, I tend to bound up stairs and such, so it's pretty suspicious.. and without a limp, it's either a weapon or you're a Tom Wolfe wannabee. Since I don't dress for the latter role, and faking a limp is very tiring, that narrows it down pretty quickly... these days, they just sit in an umbrella stand by the front door.<br><br>When they were available, I even bought one of those collapsible umbrellas with what amounts to a foot-long ice pick in the shaft. I never carried it, and finally discarded it. The quality of the umbrella was very poor, the blade was difficult to draw quickly, and despite possible deterrent value, I had doubts about any real stopping power... and it would be just too difficult to justify. So many such things, in the final analysis, are mostly novelties.<br>

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#5085 - 03/28/02 02:12 PM Re: urban PSK?
Anonymous
Unregistered


For me a hiking staff (or walking stick in urban mode) is a virtual essential with numerous uses, one of which could be self defense. If I had to travel on foot in an urban area after the Big One, I would want my hiking staff as much as ever, and I would probably go for the stout converted tool handle model (shades of the quarter staffs of Robin Hood and Little John), mostly because it would be a superior whacker to the collapsible, light aluminum models. Should I get a matching cloak?<br><br>Be sure to speak softly if you carry one..

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#5086 - 03/28/02 02:28 PM Re: urban PSK?
Anonymous
Unregistered


*pictures putting a big pink bottle into a small silver tin* You're right, getting that to fit would involve a violation of the laws of physics. :)<br><br>Actually, I was thinking of PB tablets. I think you can get them in blister packs, but I know you can get Immodeum in blisters. Not for normal purposes, but sitting in a "public recovery point" with an active stomach bug, I'd pop a couple. For general purpose, there is some in my PMK, with a last ditch stash in my PSK. <br><br>As for the compass, it was mentioned as a comparasion. I actually don't bother with a button compass in my PSK, or in my UPSK when I put it together. <br><br>I haven't thought about seeing if I could get a pair of lenses fitted into a set of folding frames, that might be an idea, but since my UPSK is a supplimental, I try to stick to a containers like a mini-Altoids tin. <br><br>Don't worry, you didn't offend me. I was just pointing out my reasonings. If I was anything, it was annoyed at myself for having been unclear in the first place.<br><br>

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#5087 - 03/28/02 03:14 PM Re: urban PSK?
Anonymous
Unregistered


>>*pictures putting a big pink bottle into a small silver tin* You're right, getting that to fit would involve a violation of the laws of physics. smile <<<br><br>Oh, dear. Not only have I offended, but now we’re talking physical violation. :-)<br><br>>>As for the compass, it was mentioned as a comparasion. I actually don't bother with a button compass in my PSK, or in my UPSK when I put it together. <<<br><br>You surprise me there. Have you not gotten disoriented in the city? I have a small compass on a zipper pull of my shoulder bag, and I have often consulted it when getting off the subway at an unfamiliar station, sometimes just to choose the exit. A map is not much good if you don't know which way you're facing.<br><br>Some cities, of course, are laid out in grids, and I can see an argument for not needing a compass there- though checking a compass can still be faster than walking a half block to check road signs. Some cities, after the Old World fashion, “just grew”, and the organic qualities of road directions can be very confusing… and the worst, of course, are those that were “planned”, from the warlike dreams of Pierre L’Enfant to the post-modernist city planners trying to let several thousand people per square mile live in relative isolation. I use a digital compass in my vehicle as well.<br><br>Then there’s the fact that cab drivers in some areas like to take tourists on involuntary trips around the city to separate them from cash- a compass is one of the easier ways to detect that, in a strange city.<br><br>>>I haven't thought about seeing if I could get a pair of lenses fitted into a set of folding frames, that might be an idea, but since my UPSK is a supplimental, I try to stick to a containers like a mini-Altoids tin. <<<br><br>I don’t wear them for distance, just reading, so the drug-store variety do nicely for me. I decided that if it wasn’t in the container, I’d have to carry another spare pair elsewhere anyway, and it was much more likely to be missing when I really needed it.<br>

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#5088 - 03/28/02 04:45 PM Personal Disaster Experience ( Re: urban PSK?
Anonymous
Unregistered


Hello, All --<br><br> Urban survival is an interesting thread. So much depends on the scenario, and whether you can leave or must stay put. You may have reasons to stay close to home -- a home, a business, relatives, or whatever. Or you may have no choice in the matter. <br><br>I had to stay put. Forgive the length, but I hope it will be of interest.<br><br> I live in the US Virgin Islands, and experienced Hurricane Hugo in 1989. 214 mph + winds created what one insurance adjuster told me was "the worst devastation he'd ever seen on US soil." <br><br> My wife and I survived (biting our nails) in a reinforced concrete condo, even though the walls hummed like guitar strings. We kept the roof, lost all the glass and sliding doors -- instant "living room stew." After the storm, there wasn't a residential roof in sight; trees were stripped and lying all over the roads, even the grass was stripped off the earth. Needless to say, it posed some interesting survival challenges. Perhaps some will be instructive to others. I learned quite a bit.<br><br> All power and phone lines down -- no contact with friends and family. Roads blocked, airport closed. Radio and TV stations off the air due to antenna loss. Only (erroneous) AM radio news from far away. Local newspaper -- down for weeks. Cops, firemen, doctors and nurses, all dealing with their own personal problems at home. Groceries and gas stations closed for days. Help far away. Anarchy for most of a week. Looters, unfortunately.<br><br> A few lessons learned (in random order):<br>--No power means no lights, including streetlights (plenty of flashlights and batteries; wish we'd had long lasting LED's then.) A Photon in your pocket's good; a better light is needed for general use. I now like the Lightwave 2000 LED for non-pocket carry. I have several, and a box of AA alkalines.<br>--No gas stations operating unless they have generators (Keep your car full!) It's a madhouse at stations open on generator power, what with pedestrians carrying gas cans, cars lined up for fill ups. A spare jerry can is handy.<br>--If you have a tarp and rope, you can make a damaged dwelling habitable. But you have to have water (we use cisterns here in every house) and either a bucket or a backup generator to pump it out. Obviously heat may be needed (fortunately not here!) but I have no advice there.<br>--Ditto cooking; a gas stove is good, but you need a generator for electric. A camping stove makes good backup. Perishables are ruined in a day or two without emergency power for the fridge/freezer.<br>--Laundry (if you have the water) means a bucket. And you have plenty of yucky, dirty stuff, including rugs, curtains, and many, many towels. Forget the underwear and socks unless it's cold. Dirty clothes are just fine for doing more cleanup work the next day, and the day after that ad nauseum. Gardening can showers take only a pint or two of water.<br>--If you're going to get a generator, don't fool around with the $200 Coleman/Dayton at Kmart; repairmen are hard to find after a disaster, and generators only break when you're using them constantly. Spend the money for a quality Onan, Honda, Yamaha, etc. 4-6 KW will run the essentials (other than heat/AC). Electric start is good, and can recharge the battery while running. Keep spare plugs and filters. (And be sure to drain the carb/run dry when you store it -- carburetor gasoline residue is the main reason they won't start.) If you're really serious, and have the budget, get a permanently installed diesel (mine's an 11.5 KW Onan.) <br>--Corollary to above: if you're going to have a generator of any kind, spend a couple hundred bucks and install a manual transfer switch by the electrical panel. That shuts off the utility and connects your house to generator power (even if you can't run everything at once off a portable). If you don't use the isolator switch, you risk electrocuting utility repairmen down the street. If you don't power the house circuitry, you'll run out of extension cords and trip over the ones you have.<br>--First trip out, I tried to drive to my business to see if it was still there. Damaged, but standing, fortunately. Unfortunately, I had TWO flat tires due to extensive debris. Lesson: Make sure you carry at least two cans of "fix a flat" in your trunk. Even better, get a $5 tire plug kit and an air canister and learn how to fix 'em yourself.<br>--Corollary to above; 20-30% of cars were not usable due to damage or blockage. Do you have access to another?<br>--While pushing the car through mud going around a downed tree, I stepped right out of my shoe and onto sharp metal. Lesson: if medical care is remote for a while, keep good supplies, and a kit in the car. An infection can put you out of action, and there's plenty of opportunity for cuts and wounds after any disaster.<br>--Sadly, firearms. My wife and I both wore sidearms for a week. When I got to my place of business, I was able to rout the looters without having to shoot anyone. The NRA is right -- showing a gun is usually threat enough. Racking a pistol or shotgun slide is understood from movies as the universal command to halt what you're doing. I became the night security guard at my business, since there were no lights, cops, alarm companies, etc. It gets tiring doing security detail after all day cleanup efforts.<br>--Cash; who takes credit cards when the authorization phone lines are down? What ATM's work then either? Keep a few hundred bucks in small bills. Small gold coins would have a place, too, although I didn't need mine.<br>--Sharing: neighbors banded together to help each other. If you have neighbors, you'll need each other. For several days we had group cookouts to use frozen meat that was going to go bad. Then a food broker dropped off several cases of filet mignons because his freezer was down, too. Keep an extra propane cylinder for your gas grill. We cooked exclusively on ours for weeks. A side burner is nice to have for boiling.<br><br> I could go on and on about the experience: it took a week for airlifted Guardsmen and Marshals to restore order; 60 days for full utility power to be restored; ten weeks on phone service (other than cellular, which is quicker and easier to repair. Own a cell phone.). Admittedly an island location slows repair efforts, but I hear it was still a huge problem in Charleston SC, with far less destruction.<br><br> You DO adjust to changed circumstances, though. I was peeing in the dark for weeks after the power came back on because I'd quit hitting the switch after the first week of outage. It was strange hearing bird calls instead of generator noise. The first restaurant to open had a sign out front: "Today's special: Food!" Ice was something we hadn't seen in weeks until a hotel gave us a cooler full.<br><br> As discussed elsewhere, I'm attuned to a lot of these issues now. I have EDC kits, off road kits, several different medical kits, etc. But if you're going to have to stay put in a non-wilderness scenario, it's a different game. You probably won't need the snares and fish hooks and compass, but you will need tarps, rope, batteries, food and water. A firearm added peace of mind for me. <br><br> And, obviously, s*** happens often without warning. The useful exercise is to picture the above scenario where almost all the infrastructure of civilization disappears. What have you done to prepare for that?<br><br> It does happen in real life. Hopefully it won't happen to you -- but, hey; then why are we all part of this forum?<br><br> Regards -- Karl<br>

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#5089 - 03/28/02 05:11 PM Personal Disaster Experience ( Re: urban PSK?
Anonymous
Unregistered


Thanks for the story! This is just the sort of story that is needed to remind us all that the problems are real and that they are not really new (post 911). Your experience is the most valuable experience. Please share as much as you can with the rest of us who are trying to prepare without haveing actually gone through the challenges you faced. Doug also collects stories of survival and perhaps he would want to add a story section to the Urban survival pages or Urban survival stories to the story pages.<br><br>Thanks!<br><br>Brad

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#5090 - 03/28/02 07:10 PM Re: urban PSK?
Schwert Offline
Old Hand

Registered: 03/13/02
Posts: 905
Loc: Seattle, Washington
While I am more equipped and have spent considerable time and effort planning for the major events, small changes have crept into my daily life.<br><br>Last year after the earthquake several coworkers evacuated our building without coats, purses, keys, check books, ATM cards, credit cards, phone numbers, phones etc. Many people left their coats in their car in the attached parking garage. Fortunately it was a fairly nice day (no rain) so people we not getting wet, but lack of a coat, and no access to the car could have been a much more significant problem. Lots of people had no money, no keys, and no ID. We were unable to claim our cars or enter the building to pick up personal belongings for several days after the earthquake. My workplace actually set up emergency fund dispersion for people who could not pay their rent, buy food etc without their credit cards, checkbooks etc.<br><br>I carry the basics everwhere in the building. My vest and pockets contain everything I would need if I had to immediately leave the building. If I am at my workstation, then I would evacuate with my coat, hat, and daily bag in addtion. <br><br>I always have a list of bus routes, quarters and Gold Dollars for fare, enough cash for at least one day on the street, shelter (tube tent) and paracord, wool hat, wool gloves and leather gloves, various tools and other stuff.<br><br>Planning for large events, and having contingencies for the daily aspects of our lives is what I consider the Urban PSK to consist of. While the UPSK can consist of an assortment of items, I think it primarily consists of preplanning, evaluation of various risks, and communication with your family what you intend to do and what you expect them to do in an emergency situation.<br><br>The worst thing I experienced immediately after the earthquake was not knowing if my wife was OK and not knowing where she would go if her worksite was severely damaged. We now have several communication alternatives, preplanned meeting sites, and preplanned responses if we are unable to communicate directly.<br><br>Randy

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#5091 - 03/28/02 08:23 PM Personal Disaster Experience ( Re: urban PSK?
THIRDPIG Offline
Journeyman

Registered: 11/26/01
Posts: 81
Man I love this place.I was going to go outside than I saw this post,did not read all replies yet but I'll add some thoughts.<br><br>I see survival as many phases,if i wipeout in whitewater i must first survive the rapids,then if I lose my canoe and gear I must,survive the wilderness.Which is long term and involes shelter building and fire starting etc.<br><br>People interested in urban survival MOSTLY are interested in the first phase.Can I get out of the building,away from the fumes,falling debre,raging waters etc.I bet alot of people wished they knew all the ways out of the WTC or that they should move far away once out,or that terrorists often use a secondary device.I don't think many had to build a shelter or snare food that night.<br><br>Personally I carry in an urban setting. Cell phone,a list of phone numbers(also programed into phone),sak,stout folder,photon II w/Micra,bandanna and CASH.Can't get to your car?nobody will stop and give you a lift?Wave some cash.Your phone is dead nobody wants to give up theirs?wave some cash.<br><br>well my youngest just got home and wants to play.See ya.<br><br>WOW! just came in and read all the posts lots of things I was going to add are already there! I would have a b.o.b with sneaks,wind pants,jacket and hardhat if I worked in a highrise and wore dress clothes at work.At least change into the sneakers,the time will be more than made up in the long trip out.Good point about learning your building.Do you know all the stairs?if the doors open to all floors?Often there are internal stairs if one company has several floors,these my be an option if the main stairs are destroyed or blocked.There are also private parking floors for the "big shots"with private enterances and sometimes hallways.Do you know where they are?or how to get through them? On the job I carry a shove knife,which is a thin strip of metal with cutouts for slipping the lock bolts on doors that open toward you(like the ones in strairways and hallways).Lots of good ideas here,I enjoyed alot of theses posts.


Edited by THIRDPIG (03/28/02 09:29 PM)

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#5092 - 03/28/02 08:50 PM Re: urban PSK?
Anonymous
Unregistered


The sense that I am getting is that the Urban situation requires more planning and less gear. Not just different gear.<br><br>Info on threats and hazards can be acquired from the Red-Cross or Fire Department fairly readily for most urban areas.<br><br>Maps are available at most drugstores and online.<br><br>Subway maps are available from city officials.<br><br>For the UPSK gear seems these are considered useful.<br><br>whistle, light, compass, blades, tape, multitool, garbage bag / poncho, first aid stuff, cordage, OTC Medications, And who says you can't put a cell phone or a radio in a PSK. <br><br>Anyone who has assembled a kit that can post some pictures for us? or a complete inventory at least? We have had some other interesting discussion on this in this previous thread and this previous thread

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#5093 - 03/28/02 10:09 PM Re: urban PSK?
Schwert Offline
Old Hand

Registered: 03/13/02
Posts: 905
Loc: Seattle, Washington
Here is a (somewhat embassing) list. I have taken this from an Excel spreadsheet that includes other lists of go bags, many more tips and proceedures for radio contact etc.<br><br>I have included brief lists of the type of preplanning steps I have taken with my wife. This includes the contact info and prearranged meeting places and what we both expect of each other.<br><br>It is long, but I not only carry this stuff everyday but think about my responses to Urban emergencies everyday. <br><br>03/28/2002 Version 1.10 <br> ** Maintainance Required <br>Emergency Proceedures <br> 1. Exit Building to Safe Location <br> 2. Grab Jump Bag, Coat, Radio, TV if possible <br> 3. Proceed to PrePlanned Location <br> 4. Attempt contact, evaluate options, leave messages <br> <br>PrePlanned Meeting Areas <br> 1 Primary location <br> 2 Backup locations <br>Out-of-Area Emergency Contact, information clearing house <br> 1 Wife Work <br> 2 Out of state contact--message center <br> 3 Neighbor <br> 4 Voice mails <br>Expectations <br>In all damage circumstances, Randy will attempt contact with Rosie at U or Home. Rosie will stay or evacuate to safest preplanned meeting place with Go bag plus Radios and TV. Randy will make way to University or home, using car, public transit, or walk. <br> If Rosie at Work <br> 1 Minimal damage, expect arrival by car, 60 minutes minimum <br> 2 Minor damage, expect arrival by friend or public transit, 120 minutes mimimum. <br> 3 Major damage, expect arrival by walk, 240 minutes mimimum. <br> <br> If Rosie at Home <br> 1 Minimal damage, expect arrival by car, 120 minutes minimum <br> 2 Minor damage, expect arrival by friend or public transit, 240 minutes mimimum. <br> 3 Major damage, expect arrival by walk, 8-24 hours mimimum. <br> <br>Make contact with clearing house ASAP. Leave detailed messages and note time. <br> <br>Seek or deploy shelter at earliest possible time, Wait for other party if possible. <br>Monitor Motorola Radio. <br>Monitor Public Radio, do not use TV to save battery life. <br>Information Post..Thorn Tree <br>Description of Emergency location thought to survive just about anything where a note can be left to inform other party. <br>On-Body Kit This kit consists of both pockets and a Filson Vest normally worn at all times. <br> Clothing excluding Filson Vest <br> Shirt Pockets, 2 usually Filson <br> 1 Moleskine Notebook, 9x13cm, LIST and tips, SS 2x3 Ruled card, 4 Bus Cards <br> 2 Jack the Ripper blades, sailmakers needle with red wool <br> 6m Heavy Waxed 3 strand nylon thread, Bus Route Notes <br> UTM Roamer 1:24000, William Vannerson PSK Cheet Sheet <br> 1 MicroFiber cleaning cloth in plastic pouch <br> opt Case, Mini-Trapper Amber-Bone Pocket Knife, 2.25 Clip/Spey<br> 1 Pelikan 600, Fine pt, Roller Ball Pen<br> <br> 1 Lamy 185 Scribble Lead Holder w 2 M40/43 3.15 mm leads<br> 1 Lamy Safari Ballpoint Pen<br> 1 Tube w 3 4B Graphite M40 and 2 Colored M43 3.15 mm Leads <br> 1 Tube w Aleve tablets, 10 tabs<br> 1 Pelikan Leather Pen case w 3 Pens<br> 1 Pelikan 400 Fountain Pen, EF Nib<br> 1 Pelikan M1935 #1735/4000, Green Celluloid Fountain Pen, F Nib<br> 1 Pelikan 730 Fountain Pen, Sterling Barrel 925 A9/91 JB, M Nib<br>** 1 Lighter, Butane, Colibri Pen Style<br> 1 Foster Grant +1.5 power, Folding Reading glasses in hard case<br> <br> Pant Pockets, 4 <br> 1 Keys, 2 house, 2 car, 1 door release, on 3.5 mm nylon cord ~30 cm<br>** 1 Pill fob, 7 Aspirin, 2 Aleve, 2 prescription med<br> 1 Leatherman Micra<br> 1 HotSpark, Nylon tubing cover<br> <br> 1 Victorinox MiniChamp, w Red LED light, various small tools<br> 1 Coin wallet, w 4mm Allen Wrench some coin<br> <br> 1 Filson Wallet, loads of cards, some cash<br> <br> 1 Bandana<br> 1 Comb<br> <br> Waist Band <br> 1 Emerson Model 5 Folding Knife, ATS34, 3.375<br> 1 Milt Sparks Double Cowhide Belt<br> 1 Microtech Lightfoot LLC, 154-CM, 4990, 06/2001, 3.5, Horizontal Sheath<br> 1 Pair Filson Deerskin Gloves<br> 1 SureFire 6P light w 2 A123A Lithium cells, and 120Lumen lamp<br> Leatherman Wave in Leather Pouch w (next 5) <br> 1 Leatherman Tool Adapter<br> 11 Bits, 2 std, 3 Phillips, 2 square, 1 Torx, 3/16, 5/32, 3/32 Hex<br> 1 5/32 Allen Wrench<br> 1 3/32 Allen Wrench<br> 1 BSA HotSpark Flint Rod w metal scraping tool<br> or Dix Leather Custom Triple Combo <br> 1 Leatherman Wave<br> 1 Leatherman Tool Adapter<br> 2 Bits, 2 std, 3 Phillips, 2 square, 1 Torx, 3/16, 5/32, 3/32 Hex<br> 1 SureFire 6P light w 2 A123A Lithium cells, and 120Lumen lamp<br> 2 123A Lithium Cells, spares<br> 1 5/32 Allen Wrench<br> 1 3/32 Allen Wrench<br> 1 BSA HotSpark Flint Rod w metal scraping tool<br>** 1 pager<br> <br> Neck <br> 1 ID breakaway Cord w ID badge and Fox 40 Whistle<br> 1 Cold Steel Spike, 420J, 4.00, Bead Chain<br> or Woo, 1095, w Fox40 Whistle, DoneRight Sparker, Paracord<br> or Nealy Akuchi, 3.5 Meier Damascus, #1156, Silver Bead Chain<br> <br> Wrist <br> 1 Suunto Vector Watch, Altimeter, Compass, Thermometer<br> <br> Clothing Set, Typical <br> Cotton Boxers<br> Cotton Tee Shirt<br> Wool Long Sox<br> Cotton or Cotton Blend Pants, Tilley usually <br> Filson Shirt, Alaska Guide, Moleskin, or Shelter Cloth <br> Trask Bison Shoes <br> Filson Style 8 Wool Vest, Double back, 6 Pockets <br> Silhouette Eyeglasses, 03/02/2002 prescription or Contacts <br> opt Neoprene Back Brace <br> Rings, Au Wedding Band, Au Celtic 20 yr Anniversary Band <br> <br> Filson Style 8 Wool Vest <br> Rear Pocket <br> 1 Austrian Boiled Wool Hat, Red w Ear Flaps <br> 1 Filson Fingerless Merino Wool Gloves <br> 1 Silk Scarf, 1x1m, Green <br> 1 Tacoma Mountain Rescue, Storm Shelter (tube tent) w book matches <br> 7m Paracord <br> Inside Left <br>** 1 Department Phone List <br>** 1 Neighborhood Block List <br> 2 Orange Shoestrings, ~1m ea <br> Inside Right <br> Dr Scholls plastic moleskin box <br>** 1 Bio-Barrier Face Shield <br>** 1 Pair Latex Gloves <br>** 2 Benzalkonium Chloride Towelette <br>** 2 Alcohol Towellette <br>** 4 Assorted Adhesive Bandage Strips <br>** 1 Moleskin sheet <br> Lower Left <br> 2 Bandana <br>** 1 CMG Infinity LED Light w 1 AA cell, ~0.9m lanyard <br> Nylon Snap Pouch <br>** 1 Bronica Savanna Fluid type Lighter w SS Tool, Saran Wrap <br>** 1 Potable Aqua, 50 tabs, 03/15/2002 purchase <br> 1 Platypus 1L water storage pouch <br> Lower Right <br>** 1 Mini MagLite, 2 AA cell <br> 1 Window Punch, Spring Loaded <br> Neoprene Pouch w (9 items below) <br> 1 ACR Flat Whistle <br> 1 DMT Diamond Folding Hone <br> 1 File, Teeny, V, Fine, Plastic Lanyard and clip, paper wrap <br>** 4 AA cells in plastic bag <br>** 2 123A Lithium Cells in plastic bag, tape <br> 1 Flat Contact Case <br> 1 Mini Spark rod on Wood block w scraper, DoneRight <br> 2 Rubber Bands, around Hone and File <br> 1 Paper, Write in Rain, Quarter Sheet <br> Upper Left, 4 compartment <br> 1 Chris Reeve Small Sebenza, BG42, 2.75, w nylon lanyard <br>** 1 SureFire E2, 2 123A Lithium cell, Flashlight, nylon lanyard <br> 1 Silva, Model 345, Brass Match Case w compass, lanyard, sewing needle <br> 1 Victorinox Large Army Knife, Blade, Saw, Corkscrew, Awl, mini screwdriver <br> Upper Right, 2 compartment <br> 1 Cadelli Schedule Book, 2002 <br> 1 SailMakers Needle, red wool, IN Schedule Book Binding <br> 1 Minox 6x16 Monocular, w ~1m nylon lanyard, in cloth pouch, kangaroo wrap <br> <br>Personal Survival Kits, 4 models, Shirt, Coat, or Pack <br>PSK-Pkt Personal Survival Kit, Pocket Model Packed 12/06/2001<br> 1 C&F Design Fly Box, 3.5x4.75x1.25, Plastic <br> Signaling Group <br> 1 Gerber 2x3 Signal Mirror, plastic bag, protective paper <br> 1 Fox 40 modified Whistle <br> Emergency Devices Group <br> 1 Spyderco Centofante ATS34, 2.75, Folding Knife <br> 1 HackSaw Blade, 18pt/in <br> 1 Varco Steel Wire Saw, nylon finger loops, covered w Waxed nylon twine <br> 1 #20 Scalpel Blade in foil packet <br> 1 C&F Design Needle and Tube, Magnet Tool, Sewing Awl tool <br> 1 Large SailMakers needle <br> 4 Sailmakers canvas needles, in plastic tube <br> 5m Kevlar Thread, around needle tube <br> 5m Waxed nylon thread around needles in tube <br> .6m Heavy Braided nylon <br> 3m Copper wire, braided, heavy <br> 10m SS plastic coated wire, thin necklace wire, on spool <br> 4 Premade hand braided SS wire snares, on above spool <br> 1 12' Braided Leader <br> 1 Fish Hooks, 20..2/0-6 Partridge, 25..10-18 Tiemco <br> 1 Swivels..5, Sinkers..8, Flies--Stimulator..1, Hares Ear, Muskrat..6 <br> 7m Braided Monofilament <br> 1 8/0 Gaff Hook <br> Firestarting Group <br>** 1 Bic Lighter, small <br> 1 B&L 5, 10, 20 power magnifier <br> 1 Magnesium Spark rod, small <br> 1 BSA HotSpark flint <br> 3.25 Cotton/Wax Firestarters <br> 1 Cotton Stuffing, Tinder <br> 3.5ml Potassium Permanganate, plastic cryovial <br> 3.5ml Sucrose, plastic cryovial <br> Navigation/Information Group <br> 1 Brunton Survival Cards, Fresnel lens, Floating Compass, on Outside box <br> 1 Silva Watch Band Compass <br> Miscellaneous Group <br> 1 Black Tea Bag <br> 1 P-38 Can Opener <br> 1 Black Rotring Pen Refill <br> 1 Uncle Bills Sliver Gripper Tweezer, fire starter on end to protect pt <br> 1 Scotch 33+ Black Plastic Tape to Seal Box, packed 12/06/2001 <br> <br>Daily Carry Kit, Filson Style 257 Large Briefcase <br> 1 Personal Survival Kit, Pocket Model (see above), C&F Fly Box <br> 1 Sigg Water Bottle, 750ml, tap water rotated daily <br> 1 Pry Bar, 14" x 1", in nylon pouch <br> 1 Poncho, Coated Nylon <br> 1 Basha Sheet 6x8ft Coated ripstop nylon British DPM camo/Green <br> 1 Patagonia WindShell <br> 1 Bandana <br> 1 Silk Bandana, Red <br> 1 Large Plastic Garbage Bag <br> 17m Paracord <br>** 1 Metro Transit Map, SEPT 2001 <br> 1 Manilla Folder w this list <br> 1 CReeve Shadow III, A2, 4", HotSpark, 2StrawTinder-4 cotton/vas, 2 Q, lanyard <br> 1 Jack the Ripper Emergency Knife <br> 1 Holland Brothers Wallet, JtR Blades, Stamps <br> $42 1x20, 1x10, 1x5, 7x1 <br> $36 $6.5 Quarters, $29 roll+ 4 Gold Dollars, Half Dollar, penny, Uvex bag <br> 1 EyeGlasses, Spare <br> 1 Gargoyles Safety Glasses <br> 1 Pipe Kit, see below w Peterson 65, Corona lighter, Tobacco pouch, Cleaners <br> Esbit Pocket Stove, Wax paper and Saran wrap, 5 Rubber bands <br> 4 Esbit Fuel, 4 tabs, 15 min ea in Esbit <br> 1 BSA HotSpark and scraper, in Esbit <br> 1 Cotton Ball, Gauze, Pad Stuffing around fuel tabs in Esbit <br> 1 Cup, Titanium, 600ml, SnowPeak in nylon mesh pouch <br> 4 TeaBags <br> 2 Firestarter Cubes, Strike Force <br> 1 Space Blanket Bag, 3 oz <br> 1 Sony ICF-SW100 World Band Receiver, 2 AA cells, earphones <br> 1 Sony AN-100A Active Antenna, Radio instruction Book <br> 4 AA Batteries <br> 1 Motorola Business Frequency Radio <br> 2 Motorola Spare Battery <br> 1 ICOM IC-2GAT 2m HamRadio w NiCad Battery Pack, 5/8 wave Antenna <br> 1 ICOM 6 AA Battery pack, w 6 AA cells <br> 1 ICOM HS-51 Headset Speaker/Mic <br> 1 Antenna, Rubber Duck <br> 1 AARL Repeater Directory 2000-2001 <br> 1 Moleskine Large 13x21 cm Ruled Notebook <br> 1 Sketch Book, Hemp/Cotton <br> 1 Lyra ProNatura Pencil Case, 6 Monolith, 11 PolyColor, 2 Charcoal, <br> 2-5.25mm Holder-Charcoal, graphite, 1 3mm Holder 6B graphite, Stumpf, <br> Brass Pencil Sharpener, 2 Eraser, SAK, Ruler <br> Sandpaper pencil sharpener pad <br> Filson Belt Pouch, Style 209 including <br>** 1 Quantum Butane lighter <br> 1 Aitor Skinner <br> 1 Nylon Seine Twine, 8m <br> 1 Montana Magnesium Spark rod w scraper and antler handle <br> 1 K&M MatchCase <br> 1 Storm Whistle <br> 4 AA Batteries <br> 1 Victorinox Cybertool 34 in Chamois pouch <br> 6 123A Lithium Cells in waterproof Carry Case, 80cm lanyard <br> 1 6P 60 lumen spare lamp for SureFire lights, <br> <br>HAM radio specific information: <br>K7PP Repeater System <br>147.20 Mhz + offset <br> <br>AutoPatch xxx Autopatch instructions ….. <br> <br>Puget Sound Repeater Group <br>146.96 Mhz + offset <br>103.5 hz tone <br> <br>AutoPatch codes and instructions <br> <br>Wilderness Protocol Simplex Frequencies <br>52.525 Monitor starting 0700 for 5 min, then every 3 hours on hour. <br>146.520 <br>223.500 <br>446.000 <br>1294.500 <br> <br> South Sound Region ACS (auxilary communication service) <br> Frequency Plans <br> <br> Amateur Radio Emergency Service ARES <br> Puget Sound Repeater System, Monday 1900 net <br> <br>149.960 R Seattle Fire Zone 5, Repeater, N7LYE <br>146.560 S1 Simplex auxilliary 1 <br>145.590 S2 Simplex auxilliary 2 <br>147.580 S3 Simplex auxilliary 3 <br>147.340 R Fire Zone 1, Shoreline repeater <br>146.500 S1 Simplex auxilliary 1 <br>147.340 R Fire Zone 1, Woodinville repeater <br>147.510 S1 Simplex auxilliary 1 <br>147.340 R Fire Zone 1, Kirkland repeater <br>145.610 S1 Simplex auxilliary 1 <br>147.540 S2 Simplex auxilliary 2 <br>

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