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#34576 - 11/23/04 01:25 PM emergency medical gear
dave750gixer Offline
journeyman

Registered: 03/17/04
Posts: 60
Loc: UK
I carry a reasonable FAK with me all the time. It is limited to the things that I know how to use for obvious reasons. Although it is more than usually equipped with meds.

My question though is for any paramedics, EMT, WEMT, medics etc out there. If I had the space what small pieces of equipment would it be useful for someone to have at the scene of an incident which someone trained in their use would find invaluable but may not always have with them (off duty). I am thinking strictly about instances where actual medical aid may not be immediately forthcoming e.g train wreck in a tunnel, area sealed off due to terrorist use of dirty bomb, trapped inside collapsed building etc. Depending on the usefullness/weight ratio I may well be willing to carry a bunch of extra stuff in case someone at the scene can use it - so any suggestions as to stuff you would like me to provide?

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#34577 - 11/23/04 02:30 PM Re: emergency medical gear
GoatRider Offline
Old Hand

Registered: 08/28/04
Posts: 817
Loc: Maple Grove, MN
SAM splint. Bulky, light, able to be configured to splint most breaks.
_________________________
- Benton

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#34578 - 11/23/04 03:31 PM Re: emergency medical gear
Anonymous
Unregistered


On the ambulance the most used items are gloves, 4x4's, IV's, and tape. IV's are not the most practical to carry. The other items are relatively low cost and easy to find. Duct tape works just as well as First Aid tape so I would say just double up on Duct tape, throw in as many 4x4's as possible and extra gloves.

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#34579 - 11/23/04 05:24 PM Re: emergency medical gear
Stokie Offline
Member

Registered: 02/05/04
Posts: 175
Loc: Paris, France
Sorry, for my ignorance here, but what's 4x4's in this context? Bandaids or some other form of dressing.

Just curious.

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#34580 - 11/23/04 05:38 PM Re: emergency medical gear
dave750gixer Offline
journeyman

Registered: 03/17/04
Posts: 60
Loc: UK
I already carry ca 7 pairs of gloves (I work in a lab so just grabbed a handful and shoved into my bag, all sized for me 7-8 though). I carry 5 4"x 4" nonadherent dressings (my FAK bag was specifically chosen to be at least the size of a 4x4 to allow carrying these - is 5 enough, should I automatically just fill any extra space with these as the most useful things I could carry?). I carry tape of different kinds (but probably not enough).

The tape and dressings can be improvised if I run out though as you pointed out. It was useful to find out what gets used most in an ambulance though as it does sort of indicate that I carry roughly the right things.

However what I was trying to get at was things that couldnt be improvised easily but could be invaluable to someone with training. The IV is a good suggestion of this type but although I would be willing to carry the giving set I seriously doubt I'd want to carry around enough solution to do any good (I doubt 100 ml of saline would be enough!). What are your thoughts on instruments, airways etc etc. What stuff that can't be improvised would be useful?

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#34581 - 11/23/04 06:19 PM Re: emergency medical gear
paramedicpete Offline
Pooh-Bah

Registered: 04/09/02
Posts: 1920
Loc: Frederick, Maryland
There have been some good suggestions posted, gloves, 4X4, tape, duct tape, SAM splints, etc. However, I would not suggest carrying any equipment for which it is not legal for you to carry, many airways, IVís etc. are medical devices and possession is limited to those with the appropriate training. Remember, just because you can buy some type of equipment, does not make it legal to posses.

Most, BLS equipment/supplies are not restricted, but you still need to be careful. If you have a Hare Traction Splint, KEDS, C-Collar, Backboard, etc. (all BLS equipment) and apply the device without the proper training you can be held responsible for any injuries incurred as a result of your action. Remember, most Good Samaritan laws only protect you, if you limit your actions to the scope of your training.

The question asked was what to carry, I still think it best to only that equipment/supplies for which you trained.

With that said, if you can legally have (many states require a prescription) oxygen, it remains one of the best field medications around. Pete

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#34582 - 11/23/04 11:11 PM Re: emergency medical gear
aardwolfe Offline
Old Hand

Registered: 08/22/01
Posts: 923
Loc: St. John's, Newfoundland
4" x 4" sterile gauze dressing.
_________________________
"The mind is not a vessel to be filled but a fire to be kindled."
-Plutarch

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#34583 - 11/24/04 12:07 PM Re: emergency medical gear
dave750gixer Offline
journeyman

Registered: 03/17/04
Posts: 60
Loc: UK
I was not suggesting that I carry things which would be illegal to carry (although I don't think this applies in the UK). it would only be illegal to actually use these things without authority in the UK, not to possess (If I'm wrong please correct me).

Nor would I ever use something that I was not qualified to use. I just wondered if there was anything that would be indespensible to have available in the event that someone qualified to use it was there but off duty and had no equipment with them.

The oxygen is an idea but there is no way I'm going to lug a cylinder around with me. same with back boards. This is for EDC in a daypack not a vehicle.

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#34584 - 11/27/04 01:16 AM Re: emergency medical gear
Urbanite Offline


Registered: 08/24/04
Posts: 11
I too am interested in the topic of this thread and I would like to see comments/opinions on the usefulness of EMT holster kits which typically contain shears, bandage sissors, forceps and a penlight. Plus some even throw in a seat belt cutter and window punch and even a stethoscope!

I'm also considering a CPR barrier or pocket mask.

Would their utility outweigh thier weight and bulk?

Thanks!

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#34585 - 11/27/04 03:35 AM Re: emergency medical gear
tfisher Offline
Member

Registered: 01/29/01
Posts: 186
Loc: Illinois, USA
Interesting question, and debatable. Most FAK's even the one I carry is usually for small traumas and daily discomforts. In the event of a large situation such as a train wreck, building collapse, Bombings, and even motor vehicle collisions I don't think you could carry a large enough FAK, even my Trauma kits I carry on my ambulance unit may not have evrything a medically trained individual would need.
But I will list the items I find that I reach for frequently when I am called to large trauma scenes.

Gloves (multiple pairs)
Blood Stopper Bandages
4 x 4's
2" medical tape
CPR Mask(s)

Hope this helps

Ted Fisher ILLINOIS EMT I/D
_________________________
If you want the job done right call "Tactical Trackers"

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