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#32999 - 10/14/04 01:47 PM Re: Meeting Cody Lundin
brian Offline
Veteran

Registered: 07/28/04
Posts: 1468
Loc: Texas
I have been somewhat of a barefoot nut ever since I first read Huckleberry Finn as boy... or maybe it was Tom Sawyer. Either way, I spend lots of time barefoot. I am barefoot basically anywhere/anytime I can get away with it. I don't hike barefoot or walk through the snow barefoot or anything that extreme but I probably could if I wanted to. I have some pretty thick pads on my feet. I think that is what a lot of non-barefotters forget. If you go barefoot for long enough you get a pair of pretty leathery pads on your feet. I can walk on lots of terrain (jagged rocks, extremely hot or cold concrrete, etc) that my wife and friends can never handle for this exact reason. When walking barefoot at the lake or beach or somewhere else where others are barefoot, I am often asked "how can you stand to walk barefoot here" as they hop around on one foot trying to put their sandals back on. <img src="/images/graemlins/smile.gif" alt="" /> But all you have to do is feel the bottom of my feet and that question is pretty much answered. <img src="/images/graemlins/smile.gif" alt="" />
_________________________
Learn to improvise everything.

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#33000 - 10/14/04 06:00 PM Re: Meeting Cody Lundin
Birkebeiner Offline


Registered: 01/12/04
Posts: 10
It is amazing how tough your feet can get. Mine aren't what they used to be. I cut down a lot on going barefoot while I was living in Kansas City. There are just way too many nasty things on city streets for me to feel safe walking them barefoot. Now that I'm out of the city, I'm going barefoot a lot more again. Even when I wear shoes, they are normaly moccasins with thin soles. Just to give you an idea of how tough your feet can get, I used to put out cigarettes on the bottoms of mine with no discomfort.In college it was a good way to impress girls and make guys looking for a fight think twice.

Leo

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#33001 - 10/14/04 07:36 PM Re: Meeting Cody Lundin
Anonymous
Unregistered


Brian,

Glad you're enjoying the info. There's a lot out there, and you are very far from being alone.

I go through periods of trying to pursue this.. it's been a little while now. I've done 4 or 5 day hikes barefoot, up to 10 miles, and more in soft mocassins. It's slower (for me), but usually worth it, because you see so much more. You're not aware of how much noise shoes or boots make until it's gone, and suddenly wildlife is everywhere.

I'm usually barefoot in my own house, often around it, sometimes driving, but I'm too self-conscious to do it much in town.... and I've never been able to deal with one "barefoot" phobia.. a less-than-sanitary men's room. Yick. Sandals have their uses.

Speaking of which, I'm about to give 4 pairs of Tevas to Purple Heart. I never got a pair that wouldn't cause blisters in less than 5 miles. I got one pair of Chaco sandals, and I'm NEVER going back.

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#33002 - 10/14/04 07:43 PM Re: Meeting Cody Lundin
GoatRider Offline
Old Hand

Registered: 08/28/04
Posts: 821
Loc: Maple Grove, MN
I love walking barefoot. Unfortunately, I broke my foot snowboarding a few years ago, tearing some ligaments that hold my arch up. It's supposedly fixed, but it hurts if I walk without my orthotics too much. I still walk barefoot as much as possible though.

Also kind of tough in the winter in MN. Your feet tend to freeze to pavement below 0 F, so you always wear boots outside in the winter. You have to re-toughen your feet every spring.
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- Benton

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#33003 - 10/14/04 08:40 PM Re: Meeting Cody Lundin
Anonymous
Unregistered


You might want to take a look at Chacos too... they have a very contoured footbed (Z1 or Z2) with pretty high arch support (at least it seems that way to me- really subjective stuff), and it's solid rubber, not EVA, so it doesn't break down flat over time.

http://www.chacousa.com/products/performancedetails.cfm

I've got some minor complaints about them- they take some breaking in, and run a little heavy- but they work a WHOLE lot better than any other production sandals I've tried.


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#33004 - 10/14/04 11:29 PM Re: Meeting Cody Lundin
NY RAT Offline
Enthusiast

Registered: 09/19/03
Posts: 256
Loc: brooklyn, ny
i lovew walking barefoot i always have but i have bad cracked callouses on my feet that when they split are awefull to deal with.

and walking outside in NYC barefoot is something i dont think id do because of the hazards.
but in the country etc im totally barefoot.
_________________________
been gone so long im glad to be back

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#33005 - 10/15/04 01:57 AM Re: Meeting Cody Lundin
GoatRider Offline
Old Hand

Registered: 08/28/04
Posts: 821
Loc: Maple Grove, MN
I never liked walking in sandals of any sort, even before I broke my foot. I'm not even going to try, but I appreciate the suggestion. Have you tried "SuperFeet" footbed inserts? Those help me a little, and that's as high as a production arch I've ever seen. The arches on my orthotics are quite a bit higher.
_________________________
- Benton

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#33006 - 10/15/04 07:07 PM Re: Meeting Cody Lundin
Anonymous
Unregistered


Thanks, but other than the occasional stress fracture from running, I've never had any foot problems at all. I can walk for up to 10 miles barefoot without problems (and have), but prefer the Chacos around town when the weather permits.

On pure aesthetics, I much prefer sandals to shoes (hot, closed leather boxes), but I don't wear them when it's not socially and climactically appropriate, and in my lifestyle, that doesn't leave nearly often enough.


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#33007 - 10/21/04 04:19 PM Re: Meeting Cody Lundin
brian Offline
Veteran

Registered: 07/28/04
Posts: 1468
Loc: Texas
I went on a two mile barefoot hike two days ago after work. The soles of my feet are already pretty tuff from being barefoot on a regular basis around town and at the lake so it really wasn't uncomfortable except for the first 100 yards near the trailhead where the park staff has poured gravel over the trail. I read at http://www.barefooters.org that gravel is a great way to condition your feet too so I was more than willing to endure that first 100yards. Anyway as far as my hike went overall... let me just say this... "WOW!!!". You're not kidding about seeing a lot more animals and getting a lot closer to them without spooking them. I hiked a trail that I have hiked many many times before and this time I walked right up on all kinds of furry little critters that I had rarely if ever seen on that trail before, and I wasn't even trying to be quiet. It was a very enjoyable experience. It was a very good feeling to pull in to the state park on the way home from work, hop out of the truck, take off my button-down shirt and my shoes and socks and venture out on the trail with just my jeans, t-shirt, and my normal EDC/PSK gear. I don't want to get to "mystical" sounding but it felt great for other reasons also. I'm not sure that I can really explain that part of it though... however, the words "liberating" and maybe "enlightening" do come to mind. Anyway, thanks for introduction to barefoot hiking! I would recommend it to anyone who is already a competant and experienced hiker and/or outdoorsman who is physically able to do it safely. It was great! I foresee a lot more barefoot hiking in my future... maybe even today!!! <img src="/images/graemlins/grin.gif" alt="" /> <img src="/images/graemlins/grin.gif" alt="" /> <img src="/images/graemlins/grin.gif" alt="" />
_________________________
Learn to improvise everything.

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#33008 - 10/21/04 04:54 PM Re: Meeting Cody Lundin
Anonymous
Unregistered


Brian,

Thanks for the kind words, and I'm really glad you're enjoying it... and I'm impressed that you had the courage and open-mindedness to try it.

I can't tell you how many folks I've tried to tell about the amazing difference in what you see, but their eyes glaze over, or they get dismissive, or even defensive.. they just don't believe it, or don't want to hear it. I learned not to even try to tell them about the difference in how it feels, they just start treating you as though you're weird(er).

I agree with everything you've said about it. I find it a little slower, but... why are you out there? Is it to make time down the trail, or for the experience?

And thanks for reminding me. It's been too long...

PL

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