Equipped To Survive Equipped To Survive® Presents
The Survival Forum
Where do you want to go on ETS?

Page 1 of 2 1 2 >
Topic Options
#29950 - 08/06/04 04:29 PM CB/NOAA Handheld Radio
brian Offline
Veteran

Registered: 07/28/04
Posts: 1468
Loc: Texas
I am looking for a handheld radio that will operate on the CB emergency channel and also recieve NOAA reports. So far the Cobra hh_38_wx_st is the only one I have found. This does serve my purpose but the 1.8# weight is heavier than I would prefer. Can anyone else suggest another brand/model of radio that would be smaller and/or lighter weight? So far this is the only CB/NOAA handheld radio I have been able to find.
_________________________
Learn to improvise everything.

Top
#29951 - 08/06/04 08:29 PM Re: CB/NOAA Handheld Radio
brian Offline
Veteran

Registered: 07/28/04
Posts: 1468
Loc: Texas
Upon further investigation I think perhaps a no code ham license and a Kenwood F6A may be the best idea. Any thoughts? I know there are a lot of hams in this forum.
_________________________
Learn to improvise everything.

Top
#29952 - 08/06/04 10:21 PM Re: CB/NOAA Handheld Radio
stargazer Offline
Enthusiast

Registered: 03/05/02
Posts: 224
Loc: Idaho, USA
Brian:

To best answer your questions, I would like to ask for clarification on what your needs are exactly. In the Cobra line of consumer radios you have the handheld you mentioned and the GMRS/FRS radio line. Some of the GMRS/FRS radios from both the Cobra line and Motorola line of radios have GMRS/FRS and Weather receive capability.

Sounds like what you are looking for is a combination unit that covers all of the CB/GMRS/FRS/WX bands and I am not aware of any such unit.

Getting your HAM ticket (License) is a good way to ?broaden? your range and frequency use, not to mention the excitement you have of not just talking with your friends, but also making contacts with other HAMS and reaching people all over the world. HAM radios are just as light and some even have triple frequency capabilities as with the ICOM IC T90 (6M/2M/70cm) or the Kenwood TH F6A (2M/220/70cm).

One clear advantage of the above is you can talk unit-to-unit without a repeater and use a repeater in some cases to extend your range (GMRS and HAM radios) which is something NEXTEL, or Cellular units cannot do.

If you want a weather alert radio e.g. living in tornado ally, then make sure the radio also has that feature, but also check to make sure an emergency alert will override your monitoring to issue the alert.

With the exception of CB and some GMRS and FRS radios you will not need a license, but depending on the power output then a license is required. NOTE: The GMRS/FRS license is not the same as a HAM license according to the FCC.

Define what you need and what you will be using the radios for. Once you have a need identified e.g. keeping track of kids in the campground etc. then proceed from there. You can always get a HAM license and when you do you extend your communication capability greatly. For more info on HAM licensing check out eHam. I have a ICOM HH HAM 2M/70cm radio and 2 Motorola GMRS/FRS radios. I also have a cellular phone and a wireless card for the laptop. For ambulance duty I also have a HH for dispatch <img src="/images/graemlins/blush.gif" alt="" /> WHEW talk about weight. Oh wait, I don't carry all of them on me all of the time. <img src="/images/graemlins/crazy.gif" alt="" />

Take care,

Stargazer

"If we believe in absurdities, we shall commit atrocities - Voltaire"


Top
#29953 - 08/09/04 01:31 AM Re: CB/NOAA Handheld Radio
MartinFocazio Offline

Pooh-Bah

Registered: 01/21/03
Posts: 2148
Loc: Bucks County PA
get your no-code tech and a whole new world opens to you. you can even mod some ham radios to run GMRS/FRS + ham bands. Forget CB, nobody's listening anyway.

Top
#29954 - 08/09/04 01:21 PM Re: CB/NOAA Handheld Radio
brian Offline
Veteran

Registered: 07/28/04
Posts: 1468
Loc: Texas
Thanks for the great advice guys. I have decided to purchase the Kenwood F6A HT and begin studying for the No-Code license. I assume that it is not an FCC violation for an unlicensed person to call 911 on the Kenwood F6A. Also, speaking of licensing, if you have a No-Code HAM license and the FRS/GMRS license then is it legal to modify a HAM radio to send/receive FRS/GMRS signals also?
_________________________
Learn to improvise everything.

Top
#29955 - 08/09/04 06:10 PM Re: CB/NOAA Handheld Radio
Anonymous
Unregistered


Don't know about the modification question, someone here will know.
FCC states that in an emergency, anyone can use any frequency, licensed or not.
Good luck with the Tech license, I am shooting for my General upgrade in the next few months. Morse is not coming naturally to me. <img src="/images/graemlins/tongue.gif" alt="" />

Top
#29956 - 08/09/04 09:28 PM Re: CB/NOAA Handheld Radio
Schwert Offline
Old Hand

Registered: 03/13/02
Posts: 905
Loc: Seattle, Washington
When it comes to modification of radios to transmit out of their designed band, you do have to careful that some aspect of the license is not violated. For instance using modifed gear to transmit outside of its band would have to meet the license restrictions completely....so transmit power would have to be determined as legal on the modified gear. Most HAM gear transmits at higher power than FRS or GMRS radios, so you would have to make sure you did not exceed the power levels for the license. You also have to be careful that the modified gear is not transmitting outside of its frequency allocation. Transmitting outside of the band, that results in interference is a huge deal, you can be fined and lose your license. Modification of gear is sometime way easier to do than testing to make sure it performs properly once modified.

For the most part I think sticking to HAM frequencies is a much better approach. There are many groups around the country interested and ACTIVE in emergency communications on HAM frequencies. This is totally the way to go, IMO, for yourself and your community.

Many new HAM handhelds allow monitoring outside the bands so TV, AM, FM radio, weatherbands, police, fire etc can be heard. This can make for a very nice package in a community that has a dedicated RACES or ARES group.

We have a pair of Icom T90A's, my wife got her Ham license this year and we are able to communicate by simplex or repeater during the day, participate in 2 local emergency communication groups, and our local CERT teams.

I cannot emphasis enough the capabilities of HAM frequencies. So much for so little....a few hours of study and a few hundred dollars for excellent communications. Most of the hard work is already done in larger communities....get the ticket and join a group.

I highly recommend that you check your local HAM groups out. Ask about community service, ask about repeaters, ask about administration of tests etc.

Find your local groups here:

http://www.arrl.org/FandES/field/club/clubsearch.phtml


Edited by Schwert (08/09/04 09:37 PM)

Top
#29957 - 08/10/04 02:49 AM Re: CB/NOAA Handheld Radio
MartinFocazio Offline

Pooh-Bah

Registered: 01/21/03
Posts: 2148
Loc: Bucks County PA
I thought they dropped the code requirement. It's a bit like knowing how to use a muzzle-loader in the army - interesting, utterly irrelevant to the actual requirements of the job at hand.

Top
#29958 - 08/10/04 04:12 AM Re: CB/NOAA Handheld Radio
brian Offline
Veteran

Registered: 07/28/04
Posts: 1468
Loc: Texas
There is a "no-code" license which is what I intend to get. It is however the entry level license and all subsequent levels still require morse code knowledge. At least that's how I understand it based on the research I have been doing this past week. I agree completely it is just like requiring muzzle loader training at in today's army.
_________________________
Learn to improvise everything.

Top
#29959 - 08/10/04 06:10 AM Re: CB/NOAA Handheld Radio
NY RAT Offline
Enthusiast

Registered: 09/19/03
Posts: 256
Loc: brooklyn, ny
i think morse code is stil something people should choose to know atleast a little of, you never know when the situation may call for it.

i remember when i was much younger i knew a bit of it and could understand small messages in code because of constantly listening to this "box" we had.
wish i still had that too, it picked up truck cb`s and other signals back then in the 70s.

i honestly dont know what else to call it, it was slate grey plasticshell the size of a large shoebox. and was mostly hollow inside the case with a wooden slat for a backing.
the front was mostly black, it had volume / tuning dials, earphone jack and a big orange talk button and was pretty light weight.



if anyone recognizes this bad description id like to put a name and model to that thing finally.
_________________________
been gone so long im glad to be back

Top
Page 1 of 2 1 2 >



Moderator:  Alan_Romania, Blast, cliff, Hikin_Jim 
November
Su M Tu W Th F Sa
1 2 3 4
5 6 7 8 9 10 11
12 13 14 15 16 17 18
19 20 21 22 23 24 25
26 27 28 29 30
Who's Online
4 registered (hikermor, chuuucky, M_a_x, Russ), 298 Guests and 6 Spiders online.
Key: Admin, Global Mod, Mod
Newest Members
pecenco, jacklii, DIYELECTROAL, plazacutlery, rondha
5225 Registered Users
Newest Posts
Knot strength
by hikermor
Personal locator beacon
by AKSAR
01:44 AM
Psychology of Preparing for Large-scale Disasters
by CJK
08:57 PM
slaughterbots
by Herman30
11:23 AM
Quake Swarm in California
by hikermor
11/21/17 12:02 AM
Weather radio
by jshannon
11/19/17 02:55 AM
Compact food
by clearwater
11/18/17 09:48 PM
how do you integrate daily carry with your GHB?
by hikermor
11/18/17 04:01 PM
Newest Images
Tiny knife / wrench
Handmade knives
2"x2" Glass Signal Mirror, Retroreflective Mesh
Trade School Tool Kit
My Pocket Kit
Glossary
Test

WARNING & DISCLAIMER: SELECT AND USE OUTDOORS AND SURVIVAL EQUIPMENT, SUPPLIES AND TECHNIQUES AT YOUR OWN RISK. Information posted on this forum is not reviewed for accuracy and may not be reliable, use at your own risk. Please review the full WARNING & DISCLAIMER about information on this site.