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#291661 - 01/17/19 10:30 PM Re: The urban '10 essentials' [Re: Montanero]
Russ Offline
Geezer

Registered: 06/02/06
Posts: 5176
Loc: SOCAL
Communications have many levels. A not-so-smart flip-phone is an evolution of the telephone; a smartphone is an evolution of the PC.

I’m a child of the ‘50’s & ‘60’s. While I view cellphones as a great option for communications which could be considered a necessity (now that pay-phones have become near extinct), smartphones seem to be more of a convenience. It seems that capabilities are driving what many perceive to be their requirements; I don’t want to become dependent on a convenience.

Just my $.02, YMMV

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#291662 - 01/17/19 10:51 PM Re: The urban '10 essentials' [Re: TeacherRO]
pforeman Offline
Member

Registered: 04/23/08
Posts: 130
Loc: Iowa
Communications is a key part of being prepared and a necessary element in most situations. From the ability to yell at a fellow hiker to "watch out" to being able to contact family in a disaster.

We've come to rely on our tech tools - the cell phone being the primary one. They have evolved into computers with information, data, several types of communication ability and valuable tools (such as the gps or compass apps). I've got off-line maps on my phone and as long as the power lasts they are great as I can zoom in to a front porch level from state wide.

However, (ah yes, the famous 'but') I still have paper maps and tools like several compasses, experience and training that doesn't rely on tech to augment and replace the tech when/if needed. I too am a child of the 50's & 60's when you always carried an emergency nickle or dime to 'call home' if something happened. So, the smart phone is in my ten essentials as it is a 'Swiss knife' of tools and works as a force multiplier for me. I also don't rely on it as it can (and will) fail. Now the hard part... the other nine items!

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#291665 - 01/18/19 11:18 AM Re: The urban '10 essentials' [Re: Russ]
Chisel Offline
Veteran

Registered: 12/05/05
Posts: 1204
2 weeks ago, my daughter had some health issues and needed some urgent tests. She was referred to some hospital for those tests but we had to wait for weeks. Some connections and few phone calls later, we found another hospital where tests would be done and reports given to us same day.

That hospital was 100 miles away. Although it was my home town but it has maybe tripled in size in the last few decades and I am not familiar with roads and areas except maybe 30% of the city where we visit relatives time to time.

Our other daughter came with us. For one, she is a doctor. plus she is not as technologically challenged as I am. With her GPS, she guided me to the hospital. And thru more connections we got the tests and reports. And drove back same day.

So, the 2 factors that helped us in this emergency were:
# person to person connections
# GPS technology

Although I have a trunk bag in my car for the last 10 years, I rarely needed the fixed knife or poncho. Pocket knife seems to be needed everyday though.

City life dictates that communication is essential. I have a mini-directory (printed on paper) in my car ..etc. It includes electricians, plumbers, former work colleagues ..etc. and it has been very helpful.

My 2¢

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#291667 - 01/18/19 05:17 PM Re: The urban '10 essentials' [Re: Chisel]
Russ Offline
Geezer

Registered: 06/02/06
Posts: 5176
Loc: SOCAL
Okay, I really like GPS; I own a few Garmin hiking models and have a Garmin Nuvi in my truck, they’re great. However, I’ve been disappointed by cellphone GPS apps. Too spoiled by GPS receivers that don’t need a cellular connection to function. Also, as I mentioned a while back in another thread, if a cellphone’s primary mission is comms, why use up that limited battery doing what a dedicated GPS receiver can do better. But, that’s just me.

On the topic of old guys and telephones — Today's teenager trying to make a phone call on a rotary phone

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#291668 - 01/18/19 05:35 PM Re: The urban '10 essentials' [Re: TeacherRO]
TeacherRO Offline
Pooh-Bah

Registered: 03/11/05
Posts: 2396
under cell phone I might add charger & battery, case and earphones ( which are required to make the FM radio work)

In nearly all situations I have;
- jacket
- water
- snacks
- tools
- id, cash, credit/ debit cards
- tink First aid kit
-bag of some description
- flashlight
- phone, etc

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#291669 - 01/18/19 05:54 PM Re: The urban '10 essentials' [Re: TeacherRO]
chaosmagnet Offline
Sheriff
Carpal Tunnel

Registered: 12/03/09
Posts: 3168
Loc: USA
There are some good GPS apps that do not require a data connection to operate once maps have been downloaded. I use MotionX GPS HD but that doesn’t mean it’s the right one for you and your needs. No affiliation.

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#291670 - 01/18/19 08:34 PM Re: The urban '10 essentials' [Re: Russ]
clearwater Offline
Old Hand

Registered: 03/19/05
Posts: 1106
Loc: Channeled Scablands
Originally Posted By: Russ
Okay, I really like GPS; I own a few Garmin hiking models and have a Garmin Nuvi in my truck, they’re great. However, I’ve been disappointed by cellphone GPS apps. Too spoiled by GPS receivers that don’t need a cellular connection to function. Also, as I mentioned a while back in another thread, if a cellphone’s primary mission is comms, why use up that limited battery doing what a dedicated GPS receiver can do better. But, that’s just me.

On the topic of old guys and telephones — Today's teenager trying to make a phone call on a rotary phone


I use https://help.gaiagps.com/hc/en-us.

Download maps and use when out of cell range. Smart phones have GPS receivers anyway. Turn phone to Airplane mode to save batteries. Can last a week of backpacking that way.


Edited by clearwater (01/18/19 08:35 PM)

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#291681 - 01/21/19 07:55 PM Re: The urban '10 essentials' [Re: TeacherRO]
TeacherRO Offline
Pooh-Bah

Registered: 03/11/05
Posts: 2396
Goop apps might include:
- gps/mapping
- weather
- news/local radio
- Facebook ( as an alternate way to inform/ contact friends)
- Google translate
- Rideshare services (Uber, lyft, etc)
- Library
- amazon or other grocery delivery services.

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#291682 - 01/24/19 05:48 PM Re: The urban '10 essentials' [Re: TeacherRO]
hikermor Online   content
Geezer in Chief
Geezer

Registered: 08/26/06
Posts: 6952
Loc: southern Cal
I am thinking that we might make a distinction between what is necessary in a normally functioning urban situation, with all the usual services intact, and what you would need when things are going south - a widespread power outage, bad storms, etc.

In an extensive power outage about a year ago, driving on our city streets was a bit too much o an adventure - no lighting on or near the streets and traffic signals were either dark, blinking, or functioning. Driving, even on familiar streets, was a real adventure under those conditions.

Imagine what a significant earthquake would do to urban areas (there are lots of historical examples). You would need a lot of items more commonly associated with the outdoors, as well as the ability to shut down gas lines and electricity, etc.
_________________________
Geezer in Chief

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#291725 - 01/27/19 06:14 PM Re: The urban '10 essentials' [Re: Chisel]
Russ Offline
Geezer

Registered: 06/02/06
Posts: 5176
Loc: SOCAL
Chisel — as I’ve noted many times over the years, I like GPS technology a lot, just not in my cellphone. I have a Garmin Nuvi in my truck which I use routinely and a “few” Garmin handhelds for hiking. Note: it appears the Garmin Nuvi family has been replaced with the Garmin Drive & DriveSmart families. If you don’t currently have a GPS, I highly recommend one of the Garmin receivers. They’re very useful in keeping you from getting lost and finding unfamiliar places.

If I’m out hiking/walking, I prefer to use a dedicated GPS receiver rather than use a cellphone for navigation. In an emergency, the cellphone may be needed for communication and I’d prefer to keep its battery-life for airtime. Garmin receivers do the navigation thing quite well and my flip-phone does its thing quite well, no reason to compromise either one.

OT: I took my old Garmin Foretrex 301 (GPS) wearable out the other day and halfway through the walk the (lithium) batteries died — not good. The battery indicator showed good when I started and yet an hour later the batteries were dead. So I restarted it and it lasted for one more waypoint and died again. That was the last waypoint I needed so it stayed off for the rest of the walk.

When I got home I started looking at replacements because the battery life was much less than I expected. Turns out the Foretrex 601 has a larger, higher resolution display plus a basemap and sensors lacking in the 301, and supposedly gets over 2x the battery life from the same two AAA batteries. Why is that? Turns out the 301 has a B&W LCD display and the 601 has a larger, 4 level gray scale (LED?) display. Who would have guessed that an LCD display would be such an energy drain. Anyway, a Foretrex 601 is inbound. So yeah, I like GPS for staying found, whether driving or walking.

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