Equipped To Survive Equipped To Survive® Presents
The Survival Forum
Where do you want to go on ETS?

Page 3 of 4 < 1 2 3 4 >
Topic Options
#268004 - 03/11/14 09:16 AM Re: Found A Pack [Re: AKSAR]
Tjin Offline
Pooh-Bah

Registered: 04/08/02
Posts: 1781
Originally Posted By: AKSAR

However IMHO, the vast majority of civilian buyers of this gear would be much better served with a simpler, lighter design. Most all of the really skookum outdoors people I know prefer a much cleaner exterior for their pack. Less excess material to add weight, and less pockets, flaps, buckles, and other crap to snag on brush. Organization is usually better achieved by sorting your gear into several stuff bags, inside the pack. The newer silnyl stuff bags are strong, waterproof, and weigh nothing.


I'm a civilian pack kind of guy. I really don't like having things attached on the outside. It throws ruins the balance of the pack. Having the modular approach, really doesn't work for me either. The penalty of weight, bulk and cost is just not worth it. Might as well buy another slightly larger pack to carry more things. Outdoor packs usually also have a better frame/carry system.

I never really worn out a proper outdoor pack. Yes, the cheap junk does wear out, but that is just getting what you pay for. the proper stuff just seems to last forever.
_________________________


Top
#268009 - 03/11/14 01:39 PM Re: Found A Pack [Re: Tjin]
Am_Fear_Liath_Mor Offline
Carpal Tunnel

Registered: 08/03/07
Posts: 3078
Quote:
I really don't like having things attached on the outside.


I'm not really adverse to little PALs molle webbing on a backpack as long as the pack covers the basic features of good civilian pack and the manufacturers of the pack haven't gone Molle 'mad'. The Lowe Alpine Salient Bergen is a one of my favorite packs for outings a great deal longer than the ubiquitous BOB 72hrs period.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GkT2Rfggq5k

If I need a little more capacity say for another 3-4 days of food carrying capacity I can add another 7 Litres capacity with 2 extra Molle Pouches

http://www.amazon.co.uk/Tactical-Utility...LCS+molle+pouch





Edited by Am_Fear_Liath_Mor (03/11/14 01:49 PM)

Top
#268012 - 03/11/14 02:06 PM Re: Found A Pack [Re: AKSAR]
Am_Fear_Liath_Mor Offline
Carpal Tunnel

Registered: 08/03/07
Posts: 3078

Quote:
That is the "Tacticool" effect. Don't you know..


The 'Tacticool' operators on those Youtube BOB videos do make me laugh especially when they don't know how to attach PALs Molle pouches properly. laugh

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0OjIqTwgjdk

Top
#268014 - 03/11/14 02:38 PM Re: Found A Pack [Re: Am_Fear_Liath_Mor]
Arney Offline
Pooh-Bah

Registered: 09/15/05
Posts: 2485
Loc: California
Originally Posted By: Am_Fear_Liath_Mor
The 'Tacticool' operators on those Youtube BOB videos do make me laugh especially when they don't know how to attach PALs Molle pouches properly. laugh

I have to admit, I never knew (nor needed to know) the proper way to attach MOLLE pouches until now. Hat tip on that informative video, AFLM.

Now, do they make bathrobes with MOLLE? I like to be prepared--always. wink

They really should give that video clip a more descriptive title so more people can benefit from it.

Top
#268017 - 03/11/14 04:58 PM Re: Found A Pack [Re: Deathwind]
Nomad Offline
Addict

Registered: 05/04/02
Posts: 479
Loc: Just wandering around.
I think it depends on how you use your pack. If I am just transporting gear to a site, then the big bag pack works OK. But if I am working out of the pack, then the "tactical" packs are a better choice for me.

Having the ability to configure the pack for the activities expected is a big advantage. Some days I want my PLB where I can easily access it, some days it stays home.

I don't have to dig through a big pack to find something. I can open a small pocket, get what I need and return it when done. This reduces the risk of dropping something un-noticed or having rain or dust coat everything.

My Maxpedition pack is over 15 years old. It leads a hard life. Last week it spent 4 hours in the back of a pick-up, along with assorted hardware like Hi-lift jacks, winch cable, shovels etc, as it bounced down a desert road. Several of the light weight packs developed chafe holes. Mine still looks like new.

Having gear in multiple pockets also reduces loss from cut & run theives. They may cut a pocket, but my pack will not do a gear dump on the street. Also, wearing it in front as is customary in the third world, or US urban areas, means I can get something out of a pocket without exposing all my contents to onlookers.

Guess it depends on how you use your gear.

Nomad
_________________________
...........From Nomad.........Been "on the road" since '97

Top
#268026 - 03/12/14 01:30 AM Re: Found A Pack [Re: Am_Fear_Liath_Mor]
hikermor Offline
Geezer in Chief
Geezer

Registered: 08/26/06
Posts: 7367
Loc: southern Cal
I found the video on the Lowe Salient quite fascinating. I have a somewhat smaller Lowe pack dating from the early 1980s that was my SAR bag then. It has many features in common with the Salient, although it lacks the adjustability and hydration system of the more recent model. I assume the top lid of the Salient can be detached for use as a separate waist pack; the video didn't seem to cover that point.

My pack saw a fair amount of hard use - tossed in and out of helicopters and pickups, slept on and stepped on - it has stood up quite well and I still use it now and then.
_________________________
Geezer in Chief

Top
#268028 - 03/12/14 02:33 AM Re: Found A Pack [Re: tomfaranda]
acropolis5 Offline
Enthusiast

Registered: 06/18/06
Posts: 358
Tomfaranda, you are correct re the LL Bean rucksack. Possibly the best bang for the backpack in the ~2000cu. In. range. It's only drawback is that the fabric, albeit strong, is a bit light/thin.

Top
#268030 - 03/12/14 06:56 AM Re: Found A Pack [Re: Nomad]
AKSAR Offline
Old Hand

Registered: 08/31/11
Posts: 1198
Loc: Alaska
Originally Posted By: Nomad
I think it depends on how you use your pack. If I am just transporting gear to a site, then the big bag pack works OK. But if I am working out of the pack, then the "tactical" packs are a better choice for me.

Having the ability to configure the pack for the activities expected is a big advantage. Some days I want my PLB where I can easily access it, some days it stays home.

I don't have to dig through a big pack to find something. I can open a small pocket, get what I need and return it when done. This reduces the risk of dropping something un-noticed or having rain or dust coat everything. .....
Indeed, how you use your pack does matter. However, rather that re-configuring the pack for different activities, I prefer to choose the pack to fit the activity. Being an old fart, I have managed to aquire a quiver of assorted packs over the years. Here are the ones that see the most use these days.

I have a Dana Designs Bridger that I bought sometime in the early '90s. I think it's about 4000 cu inches. It stays packed all the time for SAR callouts, though the contents vary somewhat with the seasons. One decent sized pocket in the top flap, and two very large "scuba tank" external pockets. But still nicely streamlined. It's been used hard, but is built very stout, my old body is wearing out way faster than that pack.

For casual day hiking, I have an REI Lookout that I have used extensively for several years. About 2400 cu inch. Several pockets easily accessable from the outside, yet still a very clean design.

I also have a Mountainsmith Tour lumbar pack that I like. I mostly use it with the twin shoulder straps, which carry much of the weight. I can put a lightweight shell jacket, a couple of energy bars, and a few odds and ends in it, and two water bottles in the side mesh pockets. It works for short hikes and XC ski trips where I don't want nor need to carry much. It is also very comfortable in hot weather. I sometimes fold the waist belt in, replace the twin shoulder straps with a single strap, and use it as a small carry on for flying. I can put my iPad mini, a book, and a few other things in it and it fits easily under the seat. When I reach my destination it becomes a "man purse".

I also have a Marmot Kompressor Plus. Very simple and ultralight, but still has a top pocket, and a pocket on the back. It is 1200 cubic inches but only weighs 12 oz. When I travel on business, I like to take advantage of any opportunities to get in a hike. The Kompressor can lay flat in the bottom of my luggage, taking up negligable room. But it is more than adequate for a day hike. The last time my wife and I flew down to the lower 48 for a familly gathering we used the Kompressor and the Mountainsmith, and snuck away one day to get in a very nice hike.

Note that all of these have at least a couple of readily accessible pockets for stuff I want easy access to. Other stuff goes inside the pack in light weight stuff sacks for organization. The newer ultralight dry sacks are awesome. They come in a range of sizes, and are totally waterproof, which is nice for my climate and activities. Using this approach I don't have a problem digging through my pack to find what I need.
_________________________
"Toto, I've a feeling we're not in Kansas any more."
-Dorothy, in The Wizard of Oz

Top
#268059 - 03/14/14 01:32 AM Re: Found A Pack [Re: AKSAR]
hikermor Offline
Geezer in Chief
Geezer

Registered: 08/26/06
Posts: 7367
Loc: southern Cal
I have been toying with the notion of modifying my Mountainsmith waist pack by sewing on the means to attach a larger bag to the straps, creating a civilian version of the wildland firefighter's pack. This gives one the ability to drop the larger bag if necessary, while critical material remains in the waist pack.

Modifying and customizing packs can improve gear and AFAIK, it is perfectly legal.......
_________________________
Geezer in Chief

Top
#268060 - 03/14/14 02:49 AM Re: Found A Pack [Re: hikermor]
Deathwind Offline
Enthusiast

Registered: 02/01/14
Posts: 310
How would modifying your gear be illegal? It's yours and you aren't offering it for commercial purposes or sale. That said I would advise against it. I'd keep the waist pack separate and carry the rest another way. Feces happen and at the worst possible times. I modified my waist pack with straps, buckles and D rings but carry it as a separate entity from the day pack. In the situation you allude to I could dump the pack and still have a full survival load for seventy two hours as I evacuate the area hastily. JMHO

Top
Page 3 of 4 < 1 2 3 4 >



Moderator:  Alan_Romania, Blast, chaosmagnet, cliff 
November
Su M Tu W Th F Sa
1 2 3 4 5 6 7
8 9 10 11 12 13 14
15 16 17 18 19 20 21
22 23 24 25 26 27 28
29 30
Who's Online
2 registered (Bingley, Phaedrus), 310 Guests and 5 Spiders online.
Key: Admin, Global Mod, Mod
Newest Members
Knobco, KennethCopeland, manimal, Sherette, ohmysan
5328 Registered Users
Newest Posts
2020
by haertig
Today at 06:49 PM
New bag thinking: BOB GHB realism
by TeacherRO
Yesterday at 01:52 AM
Dash Cams
by Doug_Ritter
11/19/20 11:30 PM
A Hot Topic
by Blast
11/17/20 09:49 PM
The ultimate prepper radio?
by Blast
11/17/20 09:45 PM
My Micro Blog
by Chisel
11/17/20 09:28 PM
Extreme weather 9+ inches of rain
by Phaedrus
11/17/20 07:43 PM
Military surplus stores
by Roarmeister
11/17/20 06:20 PM
Newest Images
Tiny knife / wrench
Handmade knives
2"x2" Glass Signal Mirror, Retroreflective Mesh
Trade School Tool Kit
My Pocket Kit
Glossary
Test

WARNING & DISCLAIMER: SELECT AND USE OUTDOORS AND SURVIVAL EQUIPMENT, SUPPLIES AND TECHNIQUES AT YOUR OWN RISK. Information posted on this forum is not reviewed for accuracy and may not be reliable, use at your own risk. Please review the full WARNING & DISCLAIMER about information on this site.