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#237391 - 12/15/11 12:19 AM Re: Commuter Kit [Re: Russ]
chaosmagnet Offline
Sheriff
Carpal Tunnel

Registered: 12/03/09
Posts: 2796
Loc: USA
Originally Posted By: Russ
If you can fit a 7.5" length, go for the Stanley.


I'll check it out, thanks!

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#237393 - 12/15/11 12:33 AM Re: Commuter Kit [Re: chaosmagnet]
Arney Offline
Pooh-Bah

Registered: 09/15/05
Posts: 2485
Loc: California
Originally Posted By: chaosmagnet
...my keycard is good for after-hours access.

After-hours access was one of the specifics I was wondering about, which would negate your BIB kit back at the office if train service were suspended till the next day.

I've had to wait at airports, just sitting wherever you could plunk yourself down and lean against the wall in the terminal when all the seats were occupied. Too bulky for a commuter kit, but something padded to sit on would make life easier on the tush. One of those closed cell kneeling pads for gardening would've been very helpful. Not sure if anything inflatable would provide enough cushioning to sit on comfortably for long periods.

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#237394 - 12/15/11 12:48 AM Re: Commuter Kit [Re: Russ]
Arney Offline
Pooh-Bah

Registered: 09/15/05
Posts: 2485
Loc: California
Originally Posted By: Russ
I have both and the 5.5" Vaughn is light duty. I'm not sure how much use it would be opening elevator or subway doors.

If the emergency release for the train doors did not work for some reason and you really needed to get out, I think smashing out a train window with the multitool makes more sense than trying to pry open a door that may be held closed by a pressurized hydraulic mechanism. Even if there is a safety film on the glass, the pliers on the multitool should probably allow you to peel it back. I guess there must be train windows with internal safety films laminated in there, but I'm not aware of any transit systems using that kind of window glass.

Moving debris out of the way is certainly a legitimate need for a pry bar, but is it worth the weight of carrying a sizabe pry bar--for me, no. And I don't forsee a very small one being useful to me for train travel. I think I would stick with gloves and hope elbow grease (perhaps multiple "elbows" helping out) would be sufficient to move something out of the way, if the need arises.

An elevator is a different situation, but you'd have to be really lucky to be stuck in a position where opening a door allows you to escape into the building. Well, I take that back. WTC on 9/11 is the only example I have heard of where people tunnelled their way out of an elevator trapped between floors. But that escape only worked because the elevator shafts in the WTC were lined with drywall or some other lightweight materal to save weight in the massive buildings. I don't think that's a common situation in most elevator shafts.


Edited by Arney (12/15/11 12:52 AM)

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#237402 - 12/15/11 07:47 AM Re: Commuter Kit [Re: Arney]
Tjin Offline
Pooh-Bah

Registered: 04/08/02
Posts: 1697
Not sure in the US, but in europe all the trains i have been in are equipped with a emergency manual overrides. So you can unlock the doors and open them manually during an emergency.
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#237408 - 12/15/11 02:16 PM Re: Commuter Kit [Re: chaosmagnet]
chaosmagnet Offline
Sheriff
Carpal Tunnel

Registered: 12/03/09
Posts: 2796
Loc: USA
Our trains have manual overrides for the doors and windows rigged for emergency escape.

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#237413 - 12/15/11 04:23 PM Re: Commuter Kit [Re: Tjin]
Arney Offline
Pooh-Bah

Registered: 09/15/05
Posts: 2485
Loc: California
Originally Posted By: Tjin
Not sure in the US, but in europe all the trains i have been in are equipped with a emergency manual overrides.

Thank you, that is exactly my point. If you can operate the manual release, you don't need a pry bar. If you can't operate or reach the release for some reason, I'm not sure a small pry bar would help and a larger one is just too heavy to carry everyday unless you get a lightweight (and expensive) titanium one.

To me, opening train doors is not a practical reason to endure the inconvenience of carrying a pry bar in an EDC kit. Obviously, train doors are not the only situation a pry bar may be useful, though, but we have to choose the situations that we ultimately prepare for. I make sure to have a pry bar right next to my bedroom door in case a California earthquake shifts the house enough to jam the door

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#237414 - 12/15/11 04:27 PM Re: Commuter Kit [Re: Arney]
Russ Online   content
Carpal Tunnel

Registered: 06/02/06
Posts: 4594
Loc: SOCAL
Is 4.80 oz too heavy? I don't know. I carry a 12" Wonderbar in my truck along with a 22 oz framing hammer. I don't have plans to EDC a pry bar because I can think of no use for one on the walk home.

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#237470 - 12/16/11 09:56 PM Re: Commuter Kit [Re: chaosmagnet]
acropolis5 Offline
Enthusiast

Registered: 06/18/06
Posts: 326
Admitedly, I somewhat obcess on this type of kit. You have a good start. Let me add a few comments as food for thought. Cash ($100-$1000, assorted mostly $1,5,10 & 20s) saves your life in buying a needed taxi ride, hotel room or avioding a mugging. In a blackout, credit cards do not work. An extra, secondary credit card. If you loose your wallet, you'll be much happier with this precaution. Some, (4-8), quarters are useful for pay phones (there are still some around), vending machines and parking meters. Gloves, heavy leather or lighter Kevlar/Nomex, to protect your hands in a bailout situation. Swim goggles to seal stuff out of your eyes. Color copies of important documents,e.g. driver's license, medical insurance card, credit cards (both sides). Duct tape, preferably Gorilla brand, enough to seal an office door, even if you have to split it in half. Commonly used drugs for pain/allergy/etc., along with a 2 day supply of prescrition drugs. A 4-way silcock key to obtain water from urban spigots with no handles or recessed cocks, albeit a Leatherman may do the trick in a pinch. You're dead wrong on water purification. Urban bugout will have the most polluted water, chemicals, germs, viruses, debris, etc. You need a high quality straw filter or bottle for all of the above. I like Seychelles brand (Advanced Models), especially for the straw. Cordage, say 25-50ft. of 550 cord. For an evac from a train tunnel, sealed high-rise or underground/sealed train station, a MyXcaper Mask filter (teamed with the swim goggles). Lastly, if you need a truma kit, you really need it. They are a bit of bulk, but very lightweight. Happy thinking and may you never need to use any of this.

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#237485 - 12/17/11 01:37 AM Re: Commuter Kit [Re: acropolis5]
hikermor Online   content
Geezer in Chief
Geezer

Registered: 08/26/06
Posts: 5998
Loc: southern Cal
Originally Posted By: acropolis5
You're dead wrong on water purification. Urban bugout will have the most polluted water, chemicals, germs, viruses, debris, etc. You need a high quality straw filter or bottle for all of the above.


Really? You certainly have a point if we are discussing open water sources - puddles or open containers or water systems that have been compromised by breaks in mains - something that might happen in a massive earthquake. I don't believe there is likely to be any kind of problem in a normally functioning water system in most developed countries, especially the USA. Chemical contamination will require extraordinary measures.
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#237492 - 12/17/11 06:11 AM Re: Commuter Kit [Re: hikermor]
acropolis5 Offline
Enthusiast

Registered: 06/18/06
Posts: 326
Hikemor, you are correct if you are bugging out from a snowstorm or other event that does not compromise the utility's pipes or filtration plant. Such a compromise of a water utility is all too common in any situation causing flooding and in some involving a blackout or plant failure or a chemical spill into a reservoir. Just think how many times the media transmit boil water advisories after a storm or flood. Heavy flooding also brings about chemical contamination from vehicles, businesses and factories. Conjure New Orleans water, post-Katrina. Finally, the Seychelles purifiers and other comparable backpack purifiers are rated for a fair amount of chemical and viral elimination.

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