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#215980 - 01/30/11 04:24 PM Renewing a Rusty EMT
hikermor Offline
Geezer in Chief
Geezer

Registered: 08/26/06
Posts: 5994
Loc: southern Cal
This thread is prompted by the current thread dealing with practicing survival skills. One of the critical skills is certainly First Aid, something that most of us never get to use unless we are working in the medical field.

In my case, I am a "rusty EMT," trained way back in the 70s, and updated since then with various certs, but none in a while. I am not currently active in SAR, but the occasional situation still develops. I recently treated a fellow worker while everyone else stood around and gawked - at least the supervisor called 911 quickly while I gave basic care to the victim.

I clearly need to update my training and skills, which are likely to come in handy during everyday life as well as in the Next Big Disaster.

So, what are my options and what are the relative costs and time commitments? In order to make this thread more broadly useful, what are the options for the first aid neophyte and their relative costs and benefits?
_________________________
Geezer in Chief

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#215984 - 01/30/11 05:09 PM Re: Renewing a Rusty EMT [Re: hikermor]
dweste Offline
Pooh-Bah

Registered: 02/16/08
Posts: 2463
Loc: Central California
I became a CERT volunteer through the local fire department. They do not know what to do with me in the current city budget crisis, but did sponsor me through free CPR, basic first aid, and portable defibrilator training. I was going to go to the next bigger city for more advanced training either free or on a cost-of-supplies-only basis, including wilderness first responder, but again budget woes have put that on hold.


Edited by dweste (01/30/11 05:10 PM)

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#215995 - 01/30/11 07:17 PM Re: Renewing a Rusty EMT [Re: hikermor]
Hookpunch Offline
Member

Registered: 06/11/07
Posts: 128
Originally Posted By: hikermor
This thread is prompted by the current thread dealing with practicing survival skills. One of the critical skills is certainly First Aid, something that most of us never get to use unless we are working in the medical field.

In my case, I am a "rusty EMT," trained way back in the 70s, and updated since then with various certs, but none in a while. I am not currently active in SAR, but the occasional situation still develops. I recently treated a fellow worker while everyone else stood around and gawked - at least the supervisor called 911 quickly while I gave basic care to the victim.

I clearly need to update my training and skills, which are likely to come in handy during everyday life as well as in the Next Big Disaster.

So, what are my options and what are the relative costs and time commitments? In order to make this thread more broadly useful, what are the options for the first aid neophyte and their relative costs and benefits?



I started the other thread, almost forgot , I took the St. John's Ambulance first aid course about two years ago.....I should take it again to refresh my knowledge and skills.

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#216000 - 01/30/11 08:27 PM Re: Renewing a Rusty EMT [Re: hikermor]
njs Offline
Newbie

Registered: 10/01/10
Posts: 41
Loc: Colorado
In most states in order to receive an EMT certification a person must be able to demonstrate need (i.e. have an affiliation with a rescue organization, ambulance service, guiding service, work requirement etc.) and also have a supervising physician. Usually anyone can take an EMT class but simply wanting to be an EMT is not sufficient to become certified at a state and national level.

With a basic EMT certification a person is typically trained to provide initial care to sick or injured people and assist them in obtaining higher level care in locations close to medical and rescue services. There are many adjunct and higher level training plans for EMT's. A useful and interesting program is the Wilderness EMT adjunct (WEMT) that trains EMT's to provide initial and longer term medical care in remote locations with limited resources. Some places offer a combined EMT/WEMT class.

Probably the most useful and easiest to obtain training for people involved in outdoor recreational activities is a Wilderness First Responder certification. The class teaches a range of first aid, rescue and improvisation skills for initial and long term first aid in remote locations.


Here are some links to reliable places for wilderness first aid training.
Most of these places also sell high quality preassembled first aid kits and supplies.

http://www.nols.edu/wmi/

http://www.remotemedical.com/

http://www.wildmed.com/

http://www.soloschools.com/

http://www.aeriemed.com/

http://www.wildernessmedicine.com/

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#216012 - 01/31/11 12:22 AM Re: Renewing a Rusty EMT [Re: njs]
Glock-A-Roo Offline
Old Hand

Registered: 04/16/03
Posts: 1076
Originally Posted By: njs
In most states in order to receive an EMT certification a person must be able to demonstrate need (i.e. have an affiliation with a rescue organization, ambulance service, guiding service, work requirement etc.) and also have a supervising physician. Usually anyone can take an EMT class but simply wanting to be an EMT is not sufficient to become certified at a state and national level.


This statement is incorrect. Every EMS program I've seen, both at community colleges and private "certificate only" places, allows people with no prior medical/rescue/etc affiliation at all to enroll for EMT-Basic.

When you say "...and also have a supervising physician", I think you are confusing medical control (which IS required to provide care beyond the first responder level) with the mere ability to go get the training. Don't confuse what it takes to get trained with what it takes to use your skills on the public in an official capacity.

However I concur with your statement that Wilderness First Responder is an excellent goal for those who want useful knowledge and skills but don't want to work in EMS.

To the original poster:
EMS certs & systems vary wildly by state and sometimes by county. You will need California-specific info.

Glock-A-Roo, NREMT-I, WEMT (via SOLO)


Edited by Glock-A-Roo (01/31/11 12:26 AM)

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#216013 - 01/31/11 12:35 AM Re: Renewing a Rusty EMT [Re: hikermor]
njs Offline
Newbie

Registered: 10/01/10
Posts: 41
Loc: Colorado
Glock-A-Roo,

The issue isn't being able to enroll in and complete an EMT class but to actually get certified. As I said, almost anyone can take EMT classes. Certification is a separate issue. In the 2 states where I have been certified as an EMT it was necessary to demonstrate need, although in Alaska it is considered to be automatic. The protocols, in AK, are supervised by the State department of health and they are the supervising physician. When I certified in Colorado it was to for work with a guiding organization that had a physician advisor and protocols. If you are going to do more than provide basic first aid to family and friends as an EMT it takes more than just completing an EMT class. There are serious liability issues and competency issues involved.


Edited by njs (01/31/11 12:37 AM)

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#216015 - 01/31/11 01:08 AM Re: Renewing a Rusty EMT [Re: hikermor]
Jesselp Offline
What's Next?
Enthusiast

Registered: 07/19/07
Posts: 262
Loc: New York
I was a rusty EMT. I had been out of the field and let my certification lapse for a good 15 years. However, a recent move put me in an area served by a volunteer ambulance corps, and volunteer I did. My squad sent me to EMT school free of charge, and provided me with additional training and gear.

I would highly recommend contacting your local volunteer ambulance or fire company to ask about training. While becoming an EMT is not learning rocket science, it does involve knowledge and skills that deteriorate if not used. Volunteering is a great way to use the skills, and make your community a better, safer place all at the same time.

Trust me on this, the first time you confront a major medical emergency or trauma, it is easier if it's not your family member. If you get some experience working "the street," wherever that may be, you'll be much more prepared to help those around you when they need it!
_________________________
http://spligovia.blogspot.com
A blog about adventure
in and around New York

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#216016 - 01/31/11 01:28 AM Re: Renewing a Rusty EMT [Re: njs]
Glock-A-Roo Offline
Old Hand

Registered: 04/16/03
Posts: 1076
Originally Posted By: njs
Glock-A-Roo,

The issue isn't being able to enroll in and complete an EMT class but to actually get certified. As I said, almost anyone can take EMT classes. Certification is a separate issue.


Dude, that certainly is your experience. What I'm telling you is that saying "In most states in order to receive an EMT certification a person must be able to demonstrate needs" is wrong.

I got my NREMT-B and NREMT-I, plus my State cards in those areas, before I ever affiliated with any agency. In fact is was only AFTER I got those certs that I could work for EMS around here.

If you explore SOLO's WEMT material, you'll see that you achieve NREMT-B after SOLO's 30-day WEMT course, in which there is no affiliation with any agency.

Again, I think you're confusing "medical control" via a physician and sponsoring agency with "EMT certification", even at the national level.

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#216019 - 01/31/11 02:31 AM Re: Renewing a Rusty EMT [Re: Jesselp]
hikermor Offline
Geezer in Chief
Geezer

Registered: 08/26/06
Posts: 5994
Loc: southern Cal
Originally Posted By: Jesselp

Trust me on this, the first time you confront a major medical emergency or trauma, it is easier if it's not your family member. If you get some experience working "the street," wherever that may be, you'll be much more prepared to help those around you when they need it!


I chuckled when I read this. You are absolutely correct. During my active EMT phase, I was also raising three children. Between the two situations, I learned why first aid is a necessary life skill....
_________________________
Geezer in Chief

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#216033 - 01/31/11 08:51 AM Re: Renewing a Rusty EMT [Re: hikermor]
njs Offline
Newbie

Registered: 10/01/10
Posts: 41
Loc: Colorado
Sorry, no confusion on my part:

http://www.cdphe.state.co.us/em/Operations/medicaldirection.html

"All emergency medical technicians in Colorado are required by Board of Health and Colorado Board of Medical Examiners Rules to have a Medical Director if they are providing direct patient care as an EMT in any setting. EMTs in Colorado may function in prehospital and in-facility settings with appropriate medical supervision."

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