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#21047 - 11/12/03 01:07 AM Re: What's the point of the personal sirvival kit?
Schwert Offline
Old Hand

Registered: 03/13/02
Posts: 905
Loc: Seattle, Washington
Craig,

You may want to check out the swim goggles with built in eyeglasses. I have been meaning to do this for a long time and now just may. Something to keep the dust out of the eyes may be very important, my safety glasses are not going to cut it over my eyeglasses.

I cannot remember how much these cost, but it seems like it was reasonable...especially if you swim.

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#21048 - 11/12/03 01:36 PM Re: What's the point of the personal sirvival kit?
Anonymous
Unregistered


Warning Warning!

I would be very interested in knowing the title and author of the book you are reading - sounds like it may be full of helpful information - just as Dilbert should be read by all managers.

Not all things written books make sense and not all books are written by intelligent people!

As has already been noted - safety pinning someone tongue to their lip is utter nonsense! If you have a patient that is numb enough to allow you to do that without kicking you in the head then you are far better off using an oral airway or a NP airway. Both of these can be had in adjustable versions and the NP airway (nose-hose) is flexible and fairly easily packed and even rather well tolerated should the individual awake after you inserted it. Of course you shouldn't be using these items without the proper training and the NP airway is strongly contra-indicated in the case of a head injury that may have damaged the palate.

suturing a wound in the field is also a bad idea. It is almost impossible to get the wound properly cleansed in the field such that if you close it you won't be sealing in an infection which may lead to gangrene. The heavy bleading should be manageable if it is not arterial. The healing process will begin without closing and the only real difference between closing and not closing the wound is the area of scar tissue resulting. - leave it open, irrigate with sterile water (which can be had by boiling easily enough) twice daily keep wrapped in sterile dressings == boiled bandannas at minimum and immobilize as necessary depending upon the severity. Don't use unsterile thread to close a deep wound in the field or you will be using your jack-knife to amputate in a few short days in order to prevent the gangrene from migrating into the vitals.

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#21049 - 11/12/03 01:58 PM Re: What's the point of the personal sirvival kit?
Craig Offline


Registered: 11/13/01
Posts: 1784
Loc: Collegeville, PA, USA
That's what I did when I bought sunglasses last year, when I had to get bifocals.

I have always liked Rayban Wayfarers, so I got a pair at the local Lenscrafters (during a 50% discount sale) and had them fitted with prescription lenses, including bifocals.

It is awfully nice to be able to walk on the beach without squinting, and then to sit down and read for bit, with the text being nice and clear.

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#21050 - 11/12/03 02:04 PM Re: What's the point of the personal sirvival kit?
Craig Offline


Registered: 11/13/01
Posts: 1784
Loc: Collegeville, PA, USA
Because I work with computers, developing databases and web sites, I think the SCOTTeVEST VERSION 3.O would be a better choice for me.

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#21051 - 11/12/03 03:04 PM Re: What's the point of the personal sirvival kit?
Anonymous
Unregistered


The Scott-e-Vest is not inexpensive either

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#21052 - 11/12/03 05:51 PM Re: What's the point of the personal sirvival kit?
Schwert Offline
Old Hand

Registered: 03/13/02
Posts: 905
Loc: Seattle, Washington
The one thing that should be considered in going down the vest path of kit building is whether or not the vest will become invisible.

I think that some multi-pocket models just do not fit the look needed to blend into the workplace. My wool vest in the Pacific NW works great in a casual workplace. I have worn this one or a nearly identical one since the first day I started my job here. If I take it off people ask about it....no one asks about it otherwise. So my tools are both contained and covered and secure in my "uniform". Starting to wear a solidly stuffed vest...expecially every day will cause comments, so it is best to look for one that will blend best into whatever work environment you have. This may be a silk vest, Filson vest, camo vest, photo vest whatever, but blending is needed and time to make this concept work.

It is almost like looking for the ultimate tin.....just a cloth one.

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#21053 - 11/12/03 06:19 PM Re: What's the point of the personal sirvival kit?
Craig Offline


Registered: 11/13/01
Posts: 1784
Loc: Collegeville, PA, USA
You are correct, sir. The SCOTTeVEST Three.0 Micro jacket is $159.99 and the Three.0 Fleece jacket is $129.99. That's not cheap in my book, but those jackets have loads of pockets begging to be stuffed with my, well, stuff.

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#21054 - 11/13/03 04:47 PM Re: What's the point of the personal sirvival kit?
Anonymous
Unregistered


Well said, and my basic approach is the tried and true (I know, I know, "old"!!!) moniker from the military: Maybe you want to have more, maybe you will get more, but all you can really depend on is what you’ve already got. So I try to err on the side of “already got.”

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#21055 - 11/13/03 06:29 PM Re: What's the point of the personal sirvival kit?
Craig Offline


Registered: 11/13/01
Posts: 1784
Loc: Collegeville, PA, USA
Quote:
I heard a news article about a farmer in northern Alberta who died after he accidentally locked himself out of the house. He was found frozen to death in his own barn, sitting next to a wood stove filled with fuel; he didn't have any matches.


And there weren't any windows at ground level through which he could break? No outbuildings, no truck? That's a bit hard to swallow, but I know people die all the time because they failed to use their brains.

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#21056 - 11/13/03 09:54 PM Re: What's the point of the personal sirvival kit?
aardwolfe Offline
Old Hand

Registered: 08/22/01
Posts: 923
Loc: St. John's, Newfoundland
It's even more bizarre than that. The Mounties reconstructed what happened; it appears that he attempted to climb through an open ground floor window in the back of the house. Unable to do so because of his heavy parka, he apparently took the parka off and tossed it through the open window. He still couldn't climb through the window, now he was locked outside with no parka.

The crowning irony was that the cops found matches in the pocket of his parka. <img src="images/graemlins/frown.gif" alt="" />

The news report didn't mention whether alcohol was involved. Myself, I think he just didn't realise how much trouble he was in until he had more or less passed the point of no return (which was probably when he tossed the parka through the window, rather than get it dirty by dropping it on the ground). Most of us probably assume that we could climb through a ground floor window without too much trouble, but how many of us have actually tried it? <img src="images/graemlins/smile.gif" alt="" />

It may have just been stupidity, but I think there's a distinction between stupidity and thoughtlessness. (I remember a fellow soldier and I burned up an entire book of matches once trying unsuccessfully to light a Coleman lantern in the wind. Finally, we clued in and erected a wind-break, but we had no matches left. We spent several more minutes trying to light the lantern using a BIC lighter; finally the light came on again and I realised that we could use the BIC to set fire to one of the spent matches.) <img src="images/graemlins/crazy.gif" alt="" /> I don't want to blow my own horn, but I'm not "stupid" in the conventional sense; I have a Master's degree in mathematics, among other things. I just didn't stop to think about what we were doing.

I personally suspect the farmer in question was suffering from hypothermia-induced mental confusion, possibly combined with panic and maybe, in the end, a desire to just "lie down and get it over with".
_________________________
"The mind is not a vessel to be filled but a fire to be kindled."
-Plutarch

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