Equipped To Survive Equipped To Survive® Presents
The Survival Forum
Where do you want to go on ETS?

Page 1 of 10 1 2 3 ... 9 10 >
Topic Options
#205457 - 08/02/10 07:25 PM Seattle GHB
wolfepack Offline
Journeyman

Registered: 01/25/07
Posts: 52
Loc: Lynnwood, WA, USA

I have been working on a Get-Home-Bag (GHB) to help me get from my office to home in case of some large-scale emergency. Currently I am living in Washington state and work in downtown Seattle. From downtown Seattle, I am trying to make preparations so that I could hike to my home up north in the town of Lynnwood. To get to/from work, I commute by bus. Via bus, the distance from work to home is roughly 18 miles. According to Google maps, it could be anywhere from 17-20 miles if I have to walk.

Currently I am single, so only have a dog to get home to. (the dog is outside and should be able to survive a couple of days without me) Like I imagine most of you, the reason to walk home is that 1) I don't believe the local authorities can help me more than I can help myself, and 2) the majority of my preps are at home and that is where I want to be holed up if TSHTF.

In the Seattle, WA area, I consider the most likely large-scale emergency to be an earthquake. Other emergencies such as volcano's, wind storms, nuclear/biological/chemical attacks, etc. are also possibilities, but I am prepping less for those specifically.

17-20 miles would be a long way for me. While I know that many of you keep yourselves in fantastic shape and could probably jog the whole way carrying a 100lb pack, I am 50, 250lbs, and (obviously) out of shape. I have no doubts I can hike the roughly 20 miles, but figure I will need to rest several times and also stop to spend the night along the way. So I am planning on basically a 24-36 hour trip with one overnight. It could take even longer if things are so bad that I have to take a lot detours do to damage, or am having to pick my way through broken concrete, collapsed houses, fallen trees, etc.

Also, all of you that can't help telling me I should simply move to someplace safer, or get a job closer to home, I'm basically going to ignore you. Sorry, but that is my own view. I hope the rest of you will ignore as well, rather than start sniping back and fourth.

My plan is to have a GHB permanently stored at work. I carry some basic supplies with me in a backpack on the bus, as well as some other basics on my person. However this post is regarding the GHB I will be storing at work.

Of the fast-and-light vs. slow-and-heavy trains of thought I tend more toward the latter. I am certainly looking for suggestions on stuff I obviously don't need and stuff I may not have thought of. However, those of you that suggest all I need is a poncho, a water bottle, and a candy bar are probably not going make much head-way with me.

Seattle has a fairly mild climate. It occasionally gets down to about 20 in winter (rare) and occasionally gets to 100 in the summer (also rare). I very rarely snows, and when it does it is usually only a couple inches or less. However, it does rain. A LOT! Now it doesn't usually pour rain. Instead it tends to be a very light drizzle which alternates with heavier drizzle and no drizzle. This type of weather occurs 8-9 months out of the year. During this time the highs tend to be in the 40's with lows in the 30's. Getting below freezing is fairly rare as well. As I said a pretty mild climate. With this climate in mind, I am thinking of ways to keep warm and dry or get warm and dry more than dealing with ice or snow.

What I consider the biggest obstacle to hiking home is having to cross the "Ship Canal", which is a canal for shipping which links Lake Washington to the ocean. This is a pretty wide (1/4 mile or more) canal that lies between my office and home. There are several bridges crossing the canal, but in the event of an earthquake, any and/or all could be down or at least closed. There is no other practical land route. If bridges are down/closed (and it would take me several hours of hiking to check them all), then I could possibly swim a narrow section. I am a strong swimmer and have experience with cold-water swimming, but getting warm again after wards would be a huge issue. If I could hire/borrow some sort of boat, I would try that before swimming. Any other suggestions on what to do about crossing this canal would be welcome.

There are no firearms on my list as I don't carry and don't plan on it. I do have a selection of firearms at home, but locked up in a gun safe. I'll probably ignore suggestions to start carrying a firearm as well.

I have considered a bicycle, but don't really have a place to store one at work, even a folding one. However, I consider it a good way to get long distances fast and that is one reason why you will see a bolt cutter at the bottom of my list of items to have at the office ;-)

Since I am thinking that an earthquake is the most likely large-scale emergency, my current plan in the event is to:

a) survive the earthquake (no guarantees there)
b) help, as best I can, those around me (am adding some preps for that)
c) try to evaluate the situation (stay or go. if go, how)
d) hike home if I have to
e) if hiking home, would avail myself of any bus, boat, car, etc. I happen across)

My plan is to have my GHB (as well as other items I plan to have but leave behind), stored at the office in a non-descript cardboard box by my desk. I don't plan to advertise what I have others either.

With all this in mind, here is my GHB. Currently all this weighs in at about 22lbs including water, minus boots/walking stick. Any comments welcome.

*** backpack ***
medium backpack - northface recon
pack cover (for rain)

*** clothes ***
socks, wool 1x heavy, 1x light crew
underwear 1x under-armour boxer
t-shirt 1x polyester
long underwear 1x duofold top/bottom
pants 1x ex-officio amphi

hat - outdoor research seattle sombrero
hiking boots - leather high-top

(the following are packed into the boots)
socks, wool 1x medium
1x 5hr energy
2x pain reliever - tylenol - individual packets
1x potassium iodide pill - iosat 1 tablet with instructions

*** personal hygiene ***
camp towell
sunscreen - travel size
insect repellent - repel 100
lip balm - banana boat
toilet issue - charmin travel size
tissue - travel size
handwipes - wet ones travel size

(the following is mostly if I can't get home or am forced into some shelter)
sanitizer - purell
tooth brush - folding
tooth paste
bar soap in ziplock bag
shampoo
disposable razor
comb
ear plugs


*** outer ware ***
soft-shell goretex jacket with hood
leather work gloves (for dealing with broken pavement, etc)
balaclava
wool gloves
glove liners

2x little hotties (8hr)
1x foot hottie
bandana - cotton

*** food/water ***
food bars (3x datrex bars)
2 ltr's water
water filter - aquamira frontier
water purification tabs - potable aqua
3x drink mix

metal cup - gsi 18oz (fits bottom of water bottle)
water bottle - nalgene 1 litre

3x drink mix
4x tea bags
3x bouillon cubes
spoon - alphalight 7075-t6
fork - lexan
esbit stove with 3x tablets
3' aluminum foil


*** shelter ***
4x8 tarp - coghlan's all purpose thermal blanket
emergency bivy - american medical
survival blanket - american medical large heat sheet
mosquito head net
100' parachute cord
sleeping pad (with stuff sack)

*** firstaid kit ***
basic kit - american medical ultra-light .5
10 flexible fabric band-aids
moleskin
6 blister pack of Pepto Bismol tablets
4 cough drops
4 safety pins - 2" size 3
%potassium iodide pills - iosat 13 tablets
%2 pair latex gloves
1 roll 2" cling bandage
1 ace bandage
10x pain relievers - tylenol travel
2x N95 filter mask
%handwipes - wet ones travel size
knife folding - spyderco finch BY11SBK


*** firemaking/signaling ***
match case, waterproof, orange
windproof/waterproof matches - coghlans
3x cotton balls
striker
stormproof matches - uco
quick tinder - coghlans 10pk
cotton balls
2 birthday candles
disposable lighter
thermometer/compass (clipped to pack)


*** lights, safety, and tools ***
monocular - alpen 10x25
2x green chemical light stick
1x LED 1xAA flashlight - Tank 566
2x AA battery - lithium
LED flashlight (head) 1x tikka plus
spare batteries - 4x AA lithium
spare batteries - 6x AAA lithium
cloth "slow-moving-vehicle" sign - jogalite reflective yield

knife, folding - victronix outrider
wrist strap

walking stick


*** misc ***
am/fm radio - sangean dt-180
ear buds - jlab jbuds
ear phones - coby cve207
1x AAA battery - lithium

cell phone recharger - 120v
cell phone recharger - 12v
usb charger cable

sun glasses
sun glass case
watch - casio f201wa-1a
carabiner - Mad Rock Super Tech Keylock Straight

reading glasses - bifocal
reading glass case

maps - seattle
maps - everett/edmonds/lynnwood

1x 5hr energy
1x gum
3x plastic grocery bags

2x garbage bags
1x kitchen trash bag
twist ties
4x zip-ties - small
4x zip-ties - med
2x zip-ties - large

2x wooden pencil
2x pen
1x perm marker
1x small spiral notebook - 5x3
survival cards
6 rubber bands
cash (see docs/money)
change - 1/2 roll quarters

folding dog bowl - bison travel bowl
leash - 6ft
whistle
spy capsule

safety pins - 2 large
sewing kit - with extra button, pre-threaded needles
3" extra-heavy duty sewing needles
needle threader
15' fishing line

*** docs/money ***
cash - $200 ($1x10, $5x2, $10x2, $20x8)
1x envelope ($1x5, $5x1, $10x1, $20x4)
1x wallet ($1x5, $5x1, $10x1, $20x4)

wallet - nylon
cash (see docs/money)
reading glasses - rescue reader +2.00

usb drive
drivers license
birth certificate
ssn card
family pictures
will
insurance policies
passports
immunization records
bank account numbers
credit card account numbers and companies
inventory of valuable household goods
important telephone numbers
family records
birth
marriage
name-change
death certificates
pet
shots
microchip registration numbers


*** other stuff - leave behind at office for others ***
emergency radio (crank, am/fm/wx, flashlight, usb charger)
8x light stick
2x leather work gloves
4x AA flashlight
6x AA batteries
8x dust mask
crowbar
bolt-cutter
hardhat
tool kit

*** other stuff - leave behind at office for others ***
first aid kit - First Aid Only FAO-442/FAO-452
4 3x3 sterile pads
1 roll 2" cling bandage
trial size Coricidin D decongestant tablets
blister pack of 9 Cepacol throat lozenges
blister pack of Pepto Bismol tablets
Neosporin antibiotic ointment
safety pins
5 flexible fabric band-aids
tweezers
scissors
thermometer
tongue depressors
ant-acid
petroleum jelly - tube
laxative
medicine dropper
moleskin
pain killers
first response aid book
hemostat
disposable scalpel


*** insure I have/get before leaving office ***
wallet
cell phone
keys
bus pass (in case bus is running somewhere along the way)
hat
jacket
fill water bottle (if possible and safe)


Well, there is my GHB. Let me know what you think and let the rotten tomatoes fly.


Top
#205462 - 08/02/10 07:46 PM Re: Seattle GHB [Re: ]
wolfepack Offline
Journeyman

Registered: 01/25/07
Posts: 52
Loc: Lynnwood, WA, USA

IzzyJG99 I am not currently on any prescription's, but your point is well taken. Hopefully it will be some years yet to when prescriptions may become a regular part of my life, but good to keep in mind and potentially useful for others who may be reading these posts.

Top
#205472 - 08/03/10 12:02 AM Re: Seattle GHB [Re: wolfepack]
comms Offline
Veteran

Registered: 07/23/08
Posts: 1502
Loc: Mesa, AZ
I grew up on the Eastside so I know what your talking about. I think your list is great. Before you mentioned the bridge crossings I was wondering how you would address that, my plan called for borrowing a kayak to cross the lake if the bridges collapsed and I was stuck there. Also the 99 is elevated at some points (i think) so your distances may get longer on detours. Procuring a bike would make things easier for you physically.

You may consider a 'survival candle' to birthday candles, more heat if you can't start a small fire.

Lastly, consider rain pants like Sierra Design for about $30. Even though you have the long johns, those ex-offico's (wore them for years)are not that great for continuously cold weather. The rain pants will help with body heat when not on the move and weather proofing when on the move.

YMMV
_________________________
Don't just survive. Thrive.

Top
#205486 - 08/03/10 02:55 AM Re: Seattle GHB [Re: wolfepack]
Kona1 Offline
Newbie

Registered: 09/29/09
Posts: 42
Loc: Pacific Northwest, USA
Nice list Wolfepack, I see you have a walking stick listed. I injured my foot about 25 years ago and it has a tendency to go out on me after 5-8 miles so I carry a folding cane which is very helpful, I also carry a lightweight, folding 3 legged stool so I can rest when I have to without worrying about the condition of my surroundings.


Kona1

Top
#205493 - 08/03/10 03:18 AM Re: Seattle GHB [Re: comms]
Yuccahead Offline
Member

Registered: 07/24/08
Posts: 199
Loc: W. Texas
That seems like a very good list and you have put a lot of good though into your needs and the demands of your route. My suggestions would be:

1) Adding ibuprofen if it's not already included in your pain killers category. It can be great for sore muscles and other minor joint pain on a long multi-day walk.

2) Would you consider adding a small can of dog-repellent or pepper-spray?

3) A large Ziploc or two to keep your maps dry.

4) If you are actually considering swimming a (wide) canal, you will want a dry bag to keep your goodies dry.

5) A back-up compass.

6) I would add something more palatable than datrex bars -- but I wouldn't have to carry them as far.

7) I don't believe the Aquamira Frontier is very good at filtering out pathogens and would consider better water purification options besides the Porta-Aqua tablets (such as Micropur). Have you scouted out water sources for your route (beyond the obvious canal)?
_________________________
-- David.

Top
#205494 - 08/03/10 03:24 AM Re: Seattle GHB [Re: comms]
Lono Offline
Old Hand

Registered: 10/19/06
Posts: 1013
Loc: Pacific NW, USA
Hi Wolfepack - I live in Bellevue (Enatai) near the intersection of I90 and I405, and when getting a certificate in emergency management we studied the anticipated Seattle response after an earthquake - there's lots of stuff you can access to tell you about the terrain around you and what you can expect after a shake. Instead of your GHB, I recommend you focus first on your immediate environment - work and home.

You say you work in downtown Seattle, but that actually encompasses alot of varied terrain with a variety of survivability expectations - in the worst parts of downtown, liquefaction will take place, roads will collapse, gas and power lines will rupture, and your ability to exit your place of work could be hampered. Some structures can be expected to fully or partially collapse around you. Other parts of downtown could be more geologically stable, but with lots of falling windows and building parts to deal with. I don't know where you are located specifically. So, long story short, hang onto your hardhat, rather than leaving it at work - you may need it somewhere else.

Personally, if you work in an EQ-unsafe location, such as below 2nd Avenue in the Pioneer Square area, sing your death song, and praise Allah if you actually survive. Then run away, or get to work helping others as best you can. Instead of starting for home right away, ask yourself if you can bug in at work or in another nearby location, and prepare and supply yourself for that eventuality. Lynnwood is indeed a long way from downtown Seattle, in EQ terms. I work in Redmond, 7 miles over geologically stable ground from home, and in my car is a first aid bag with bulk medical supplies - tape, gloves, kerlix, nothing smaller than a 4x4 - to immediately assist 100 people. That will probably be 1/100th of the people who need it in my immediate area. Which is why I'm working on my employer to cache sufficient supplies to aid the people they employ, many of whom could be major or minor casualties after an EQ strikes. Before you prepare to walk home to Lynnwood, have you asked yourself, are there enough people I know, that I care about, that I will have a major issue walking away from them, in order to get home right away?

On sheltering - rain or shine, don't depend on the city or anyone opening official shelters, unless there is enough cold or rain such that people will be dying that first night. If so, there will be shelters in the most stable structures - Seattle Center, community centers throughout the city, some of the newer construction that can survive a serious shake. People will also be camped out in their yards, or camped together with neighbors in neighborhood parks. I wouldn't hesitate to fall in with some of these folks, as they will have family with them, and there is some personal safety in numbers. Some will also be injured, and could use your assistance if you can give any.

About the Seattle bridge situation - the good news is that in all except the very worst shakes, the smaller bridges will survive, although they may not be opened right away if at all. The predominant design of the smaller neighborhood bridges (Ballard, Fremont, University, Montlake Cut) is a basic bascule, and unless they are open to water traffic right when the EQ happens (unlikely), the spans will survive, but can also be shaken out of alignment, stopping the counterweight from moving until inspected or repaired. Meantime though, the bridge should be in the down position, and aligned more or less with the roadway, meaning open to foot traffic, possibly to emergency vehicle traffic, and after inspection to general vehicle traffic, if there is actually someplace for vehicles to go - with houses collapsed into roadways, the immediate issue is getting responders out of their fire houses (many of which have not yet been retrofitted) and begin to service the community. But SDOT will be working to clear roadways. Expect authorities to at least open a "life line" route between North and Central Seattle (e.g. UW Medical Center to Harborview ER) for emergency traffic only, but don't depend on Metro or Sound Transit to run their buses on it, not right away. The larger bridges are fixed spans, such as the one that carries I5 traffic, or Highway 99 (Aurora Bridge) - those may not fare so well, depending on the magnitude of the shake. I don't recommend swimming any of these waterways - you can probably cross somewhere, or some boat owner *might* offer you a ride across (but don't count on it). Anyway, some of the local bridge plan is recounted at http://www.seattle.gov/transportation/bridgeinfo.htm.

If you're headed for Lynnwood, I propose walking up Westlake Avenue from downtown Seattle, crossing the cut at the Fremont Bridge, and heading north on 3rd Ave NW, all the way North to Lynnwood. Its a long hike, but you avoid most of the hills on this route.

Last, a bit of positive news - there's always an epicenter, and if you can survive, you can walk out of the EQ impact zone. Once you get far enough from the epicenter, damage is much reduced, people are mostly uninjured, transportation can persist, and you might even be able to catch your usual bus on its route to take you all the way home. That is, if the bus drivers haven't abandoned their buses to head home to check on their loved ones. Frankly I'm not familiar with Metro or Sound Transit's emergency plans.

Top
#205497 - 08/03/10 03:51 AM Re: Seattle GHB [Re: Lono]
Lono Offline
Old Hand

Registered: 10/19/06
Posts: 1013
Loc: Pacific NW, USA
Oh yeah, one more place to cross the Ship Canal - Ballard Locks. The actual structure at the Locks is very stable (thank you Army Corp of Engineers), and should survive even if an EQ destroys or every other structure is compromised. This is also the westernmost crossing point, and a little out of your way, so I would at least check the Fremont and Ballard Bridges before walking over to the south end of the Locks. And expect to wait in line, there's only room for 1-2 to walk across the locks side by side. The Fremont Bridge was retrofitted and updated in recent years, and as a 90+ year old bridge nothing is certain, but you can be fairly confident of using it as at least a foot bridge.

Top
#205499 - 08/03/10 04:17 AM Re: Seattle GHB [Re: wolfepack]
Susan Offline
Geezer

Registered: 01/21/04
Posts: 5163
Loc: W. WA
Wolfepack, that's a good list. I would only change two things.

Extra socks. Your feet are your lifeline in that situation.

All that info on your USB, couldn't that be a nice gift if someone robbed you? SS and account numbers...

The bridge will be up or it will be down. Seattle sits on eight faults, and each one could probably give different results. A tidal wave could skew even that.

One thing that comes to mind is that some of the people you work with might be traveling in the same direction, a possible asset. Does anyone have a boat moored nearby?

Does your company have any plans in place for a disaster like that? Maybe you could start something. It might be nice to get people accustomed to the idea that they might be taking in coworkers for a few days -- maybe you.

Lono is right, it could be hard to walk away from the people you work with. And if the bridge is down, you might be forced to hang around.

I have a similar, but worse, problem. I drive to Seattle almost daily, but live 85 bird miles south. At least two rivers to cross, if I made it out of Seattle. On foot, almost certainly. Blech!

Sue

Top
#205504 - 08/03/10 05:41 AM Re: Seattle GHB [Re: comms]
wolfepack Offline
Journeyman

Registered: 01/25/07
Posts: 52
Loc: Lynnwood, WA, USA
Originally Posted By: comms
I grew up on the Eastside so I know what your talking about. I think your list is great. Before you mentioned the bridge crossings I was wondering how you would address that, my plan called for borrowing a kayak to cross the lake if the bridges collapsed and I was stuck there. Also the 99 is elevated at some points (i think) so your distances may get longer on detours. Procuring a bike would make things easier for you physically.

You may consider a 'survival candle' to birthday candles, more heat if you can't start a small fire.

Lastly, consider rain pants like Sierra Design for about $30. Even though you have the long johns, those ex-offico's (wore them for years)are not that great for continuously cold weather. The rain pants will help with body heat when not on the move and weather proofing when on the move.

YMMV


A bike would definitely help in getting home quicker (assuming things aren't so bad I have to carry it half the time). I just have not been able to find a reasonable place to store one at or around work. Probably need research that more.

What kind of survival candle did you have in mind? I actually had a 9hr candle in my pack, but decided to replace it with the esbit stove. Do they make small survival candles?

The rain pants are a great idea. I'll check out the Sierra's. I where those same ex-officio's to work everyday. They are water resistant, but only marginally. Given that getting cold if I have to hike in the rain is a major worry, the rain pants are an excellent suggestion.

Top
#205505 - 08/03/10 05:59 AM Re: Seattle GHB [Re: Yuccahead]
wolfepack Offline
Journeyman

Registered: 01/25/07
Posts: 52
Loc: Lynnwood, WA, USA
Originally Posted By: Yuccahead
That seems like a very good list and you have put a lot of good though into your needs and the demands of your route. My suggestions would be:

1) Adding ibuprofen if it's not already included in your pain killers category. It can be great for sore muscles and other minor joint pain on a long multi-day walk.


I have a combination of ibuprofen and acetaminophen. I have ibuprofen actually in my socks as a reminder to take them before I even head out. That seems to help keep me feeling better longer.

Quote:
2) Would you consider adding a small can of dog-repellent or pepper-spray?


This is an excellent suggestion. I'll see about adding that.

Quote:
3) A large Ziploc or two to keep your maps dry.


Actually almost everything is already in ziplock bags. I did this for organizational reasons, but had the side benefit of helping keep things dry if my pack leaked or accidentally got dunked.

As to the maps specifically, I actually took the relevant parts of a couple of street maps and had them laminated. This way I can look at them in the rain without having to worry about them getting ruined. The results were good, but kind of big. This is something I may have redone. Maybe into a series of 8 1/2 by 11 individual sheets.


Quote:
4) If you are actually considering swimming a (wide) canal, you will want a dry bag to keep your goodies dry.


This is another excellent suggestion that I have run across elsewhere. I will look into this. My original idea had been to use my garbage bags for this purpose. However, somebody elsewhere pointed out the reason I would be swimming in the first place is the bridges are down. If the bridges are down, than that means the canal is probably full of debris and my garbage bags would probably quickly get punctured. I dry bag would be far tougher and water proof.

Quote:
5) A back-up compass.


Another good suggestion. I originally had a Adventure Medical PSK in my pack, but removed it as redundant. However that had my backup compass that I did not replace.

Quote:
6) I would add something more palatable than datrex bars -- but I wouldn't have to carry them as far.


This was mentioned by somebody someplace else as well. They recommended Tiger's Milk bars. Any other suggestions? Personally I have found the Datrex bars to be reasonably good, though certainly not candy bars.

Quote:
7) I don't believe the Aquamira Frontier is very good at filtering out pathogens and would consider better water purification options besides the Porta-Aqua tablets (such as Micropur). Have you scouted out water sources for your route (beyond the obvious canal)?


Hmmm. I don't have any personal experience with filter straws and picked the Aquamira Frontier based on some reviews and price. Can you recommend something you would think is better? The same thing for the purification tablets. You recommend the Micropur's?


Top
Page 1 of 10 1 2 3 ... 9 10 >



Moderator:  KG2V, NightHiker 
October
Su M Tu W Th F Sa
1 2 3 4 5 6
7 8 9 10 11 12 13
14 15 16 17 18 19 20
21 22 23 24 25 26 27
28 29 30 31
Who's Online
1 registered (Jeanette_Isabelle), 246 Guests and 4 Spiders online.
Key: Admin, Global Mod, Mod
Newest Members
jackmiller, DaveL, Dale, rac, Boris
5266 Registered Users
Newest Posts
Best use of time, money
by Russ
10:44 PM
Funny Photos
by Jeanette_Isabelle
05:28 PM
Time Capsule
by Jeanette_Isabelle
10/20/18 11:35 PM
Florida residents desperate for food and shelter
by hikermor
10/20/18 05:44 PM
Arizona Mine Rescue
by hikermor
10/20/18 03:59 PM
Folder for Opening Boxes
by hikermor
10/19/18 03:18 PM
get a cheap laptop
by TeacherRO
10/16/18 05:45 PM
I'm Not Coming Home
by Jeanette_Isabelle
10/14/18 05:49 PM
Newest Images
Tiny knife / wrench
Handmade knives
2"x2" Glass Signal Mirror, Retroreflective Mesh
Trade School Tool Kit
My Pocket Kit
Glossary
Test

WARNING & DISCLAIMER: SELECT AND USE OUTDOORS AND SURVIVAL EQUIPMENT, SUPPLIES AND TECHNIQUES AT YOUR OWN RISK. Information posted on this forum is not reviewed for accuracy and may not be reliable, use at your own risk. Please review the full WARNING & DISCLAIMER about information on this site.