Equipped To Survive Equipped To Survive® Presents
The Survival Forum
Where do you want to go on ETS?

Page 3 of 5 < 1 2 3 4 5 >
Topic Options
#200040 - 04/12/10 03:27 PM Re: Commuting on the train [Re: Teslinhiker]
chaosmagnet Offline
Sheriff
Carpal Tunnel

Registered: 12/03/09
Posts: 2760
Loc: USA
Originally Posted By: Teslinhiker
40 miles is a long way from home if you were on foot. If I were to draw separate lines to N/S/W/E compass points 40 miles out in my AO, I would not be looking forward to a walk of this distance.


Believe me, neither would I.

Originally Posted By: Teslinhiker
I can walk 5-1/2 miles in just over an hour (70 minutes) on pavement/good terrain with good proper shoes (not dress style) however I could not keep this pace up more then 2, maybe 3 hours tops on a good day without fatigue setting in and my speed dropping substantially. If your pace drops down to 3 miles an hour, do the math and you will see that a 30 mile walk can be 10 hours for more. Also keep in mind, even walking requires regular training. There is a local walking charity event here that is 30 kms (18 miles) in length and every year hundreds of "fit" people drop out due to sore feet / ankles, sore shin muscles etc.


I'm in training as a runner. I'm no marathoner, and I'd expect to be sore and unhappy, but my dress shoes are good and as long as weather allowed me to keep my feet dry I think could do it.

Originally Posted By: Teslinhiker
I really suggest the maps and only the carry the essential, meaning cutting the map(s) to include your possible routes only. Alternatively save some offline Google Maps to your iPhone as every block or 1/4 mile saved by shortcutting through parks, shopping complexes etc can make a big difference when your hoofing it.


I don't know any way to save Google Maps for offline use on my un-jailbroken iPhone. I do have an iPhone app for offline topo maps; it's possible that I'd be able to use that. I really do know the streets very well.

Top
#200042 - 04/12/10 03:54 PM Re: Commuting on the train [Re: chaosmagnet]
Am_Fear_Liath_Mor Offline
Carpal Tunnel

Registered: 08/03/07
Posts: 3077
Quote:
I'm in training as a runner. I'm no marathoner, and I'd expect to be sore and unhappy, but my dress shoes are good and as long as weather allowed me to keep my feet dry I think could do it.


Carrying Goretex Socks Goretex socks might be the answer if your dress shoes aren't fully waterproof.

Some Silk Shopping bags silk shopping bags might prove to be useful if you find that you may need to carry some emergency survival shopping!! wink

A lightweight waterproof jacket might also be useful to carry.

http://www.backpackinglight.com/cgi-bin/...ite_review.html



Top
#200052 - 04/12/10 09:05 PM Re: Commuting on the train [Re: Am_Fear_Liath_Mor]
ZenEngineer Offline
Journeyman

Registered: 09/15/06
Posts: 86
Loc: Northern California
My most memorable commutes have been non-emergency events where I've been stuck somewhere for hours. You could pack backup reading material and a small headlamp to help alleviate the boredom of such events.

Top
#200054 - 04/12/10 09:15 PM Re: Commuting on the train [Re: Am_Fear_Liath_Mor]
MostlyHarmless Offline
Old Hand

Registered: 06/03/09
Posts: 982
Loc: Norway
Originally Posted By: Am_Fear_Liath_Mor

Carrying Goretex Socks Goretex socks might be the answer if your dress shoes aren't fully waterproof.


Sceeeeeeeeeeptical...

socks live a though life, and I would be surprised if the membrane would last long. At least that is my family's conclusion with goretex shoes, and I can't think that socks have an easier life than those shoes (where the membrane is protected by a layered construction). Even with high quality expensive shoes it is always a hit-and-miss factor as to how fast the membrane punctures = wet feet. When we get a new pair we usually trade them in on guarantee at least once until we hit the lucky lottery and get a pair that lasts the guaranteed life time of 2 years.

Life span issues aside, walking long distances with a perpetual wet foot may cause blisters pretty fast. A waterproof membrane may or may not help you, but of course the sock it self would have to fit, not being stiff and abrasive, condensation not causing you to get wet and probably a few more issues that could cause trouble.

Unless you have reliable reviews that this actually WORKS in real life, I'd stay away...


If you want extra protection for your feet, a pair of rubber overboots and spare wool socks is a much better idea. The socks won't keep you warm if you wade through icy waters with non-waterproof shoes, but you wring them half-dry and they will regain much of their dry insulation. Both wet and dry, the wool sock will typically be much more comfortable and better to your feet than your average cotton thingy. The overboots I have in mind (basically rubber "socks" that slips over your shoes, they pack reasonably small) are typically not made for long distance walking on hard surface, but may be very helpful in a downpour or for crossing wet areas.

EDIT: About the headlamp - a length of bungee cord with a cord lock or your favorite knot + AAA size light (fenix E01 or itp A3) = makeshift headlamp. Bungee cord is multi-use item.


Edited by MostlyHarmless (04/12/10 09:26 PM)

Top
#200056 - 04/12/10 10:17 PM Re: Commuting on the train [Re: MostlyHarmless]
Russ Offline
Carpal Tunnel

Registered: 06/02/06
Posts: 4552
Loc: SOCAL
I tend to agree. I have a feeling goretex socks would keep humidity out but that they wouldn't let perspiration out fast enough and would get clammy.

I keep light hiking boots in the truck for the walking home contingency. Two pairs of Smartwool socks and multiple pairs of sockliners in either coolmax (okay) or merino wool (great) and I'm good to go year round.

It's a 24 mile hike mostly paved but whose to say after a major earthquake.

Top
#200058 - 04/12/10 10:40 PM Re: Commuting on the train [Re: ZenEngineer]
chaosmagnet Offline
Sheriff
Carpal Tunnel

Registered: 12/03/09
Posts: 2760
Loc: USA
Originally Posted By: ZenEngineer
My most memorable commutes have been non-emergency events where I've been stuck somewhere for hours. You could pack backup reading material and a small headlamp to help alleviate the boredom of such events.


Good advice. I always have reading material with me, and as long as my iPhone holds out I can read, play games, or even post to this forum. I've ordered a Prism to convert my Quark into a headlamp. The headband willl work with my AAA lights too. I'm thinking that a spare 123 cell is in order.

Top
#200066 - 04/13/10 03:12 AM Re: Commuting on the train [Re: chaosmagnet]
MarkO Offline
Member

Registered: 03/19/10
Posts: 137
Loc: Oregon
Originally Posted By: chaosmagnet
........... I don't know any way to save Google Maps for offline use on my un-jailbroken iPhone. I do have an iPhone app for offline topo maps; it's possible that I'd be able to use that. I really do know the streets very well.


Take a screenshot and save as a .jpg ??

Top
#200068 - 04/13/10 04:15 AM Re: Commuting on the train [Re: chaosmagnet]
ZenEngineer Offline
Journeyman

Registered: 09/15/06
Posts: 86
Loc: Northern California
Originally Posted By: chaosmagnet
Good advice. I always have reading material with me, and as long as my iPhone holds out I can read, play games, or even post to this forum. I've ordered a Prism to convert my Quark into a headlamp. The headband willl work with my AAA lights too. I'm thinking that a spare 123 cell is in order.


I still recommend the e+lite. It's compact, has long battery life, and is comfortable for long term use around camp. I think it is a better choice than the prism kit, and could be carried in your bag in place of one of the two different AAA lights in your four-light set.

Top
#200069 - 04/13/10 06:13 AM Re: Commuting on the train [Re: chaosmagnet]
Susan Offline
Geezer

Registered: 01/21/04
Posts: 5163
Loc: W. WA
"If I'm hoofing it 40 miles through "enemy territory" the whole way, I'm in big trouble... What can I do about it? I can't carry a rifle everywhere..."

A disguise as a homeless type of person might keep you below radar. A Brooks Brothers suit, leather shoes and a laptop case would probably be every bit as good as a target, front and back. In most cases, clothing probably wouldn't be the first thing troublemakers would be going after, so buying/trading/stealing low-key clothing and a backpack (to keep your hands free) might be something to get as soon as possible. All the guys around here look like street people in their hooded sweatshirts, esp if they have one of those scruffy beards (which I will bet money you don't have).

"... my car kit as being pretty comprehensive... but it's only good for three days of food and water for one person."

Yes, that's tricky. I can't carry a lot of stuff with me, because luggage space is usually taken up with my crews' bags and gear. I do normally carry 2-3 gallons of water in 8 oz bottles (provided by the RR), granola bars and some snack foods, but not nearly enough, and that isn't likely to change. Scrounging and rationing would probably be necessary. I can't see any other solution. And the newer the Suburbans, the less storage space they have.

If a quake hits, I hope I'm home. If I'm in Seattle... SOL is what comes to mind.

Sue

Top
#200070 - 04/13/10 06:33 AM Re: Commuting on the train [Re: chaosmagnet]
JohnN Offline
Old Hand

Registered: 10/10/01
Posts: 966
Loc: Seattle, WA
Originally Posted By: chaosmagnet

I don't know any way to save Google Maps for offline use on my un-jailbroken iPhone.


Search for the app 'OffMaps'. It isn't great, but it is the best one I've found so far for off-line street maps.

If you have a real iPhone, I suspect that at least some of the navigation apps like TomTom, Navigon and Magellan work without Internet connection, but look before you leap.

-john


Edited by JohnN (04/13/10 06:36 AM)

Top
Page 3 of 5 < 1 2 3 4 5 >



Moderator:  KG2V, NightHiker 
October
Su M Tu W Th F Sa
1 2 3 4 5 6 7
8 9 10 11 12 13 14
15 16 17 18 19 20 21
22 23 24 25 26 27 28
29 30 31
Who's Online
3 registered (Phaedrus, haertig, Pete), 266 Guests and 4 Spiders online.
Key: Admin, Global Mod, Mod
Newest Members
DIYELECTROAL, rondha, burth, sgt253, PureTech
5222 Registered Users
Newest Posts
California Burning
by Pete
Inside a nuclear bunker built from 42 buses
by UTAlumnus
03:04 AM
Weather radio
by LesSnyder
02:51 AM
ETS Dream
by haertig
01:53 AM
Delorme inReach Lock Failure
by Russ
09:14 PM
Promising Snake Bite Therapy
by hikermor
10/16/17 06:32 PM
Ski glove snot wipe
by dougwalkabout
10/15/17 03:12 AM
Fitness over 60
by hikermor
10/14/17 02:00 PM
Newest Images
Tiny knife / wrench
Handmade knives
2"x2" Glass Signal Mirror, Retroreflective Mesh
Trade School Tool Kit
My Pocket Kit
Glossary
Test

WARNING & DISCLAIMER: SELECT AND USE OUTDOORS AND SURVIVAL EQUIPMENT, SUPPLIES AND TECHNIQUES AT YOUR OWN RISK. Information posted on this forum is not reviewed for accuracy and may not be reliable, use at your own risk. Please review the full WARNING & DISCLAIMER about information on this site.