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#197053 - 03/03/10 03:18 AM Re: Let's hear it for the Swede saw!!! [Re: Art_in_FL]
hikermor Offline
Geezer in Chief
Carpal Tunnel

Registered: 08/26/06
Posts: 4324
Loc: southern Cal
Sven saws are sold by REI in 21" and 15" versions. I have carried one in the car, and occasionally, in the pack, for years.
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#197054 - 03/03/10 03:22 AM Re: Let's hear it for the Swede saw!!! [Re: Art_in_FL]
hikermor Offline
Geezer in Chief
Carpal Tunnel

Registered: 08/26/06
Posts: 4324
Loc: southern Cal
REI has the Sven saw in 21" and 15" versions. I have carried one in my car, and occasionally in my pack, for years.
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#197056 - 03/03/10 03:38 AM Re: Let's hear it for the Swede saw!!! [Re: Art_in_FL]
CANOEDOGS Offline
Pooh-Bah

Registered: 02/03/07
Posts: 1680
Loc: MINNESOTA
got both sizes of the Sven saw.the smaller one always go's on canoe trips and is great for clearing smaller dead fall on the portages,the heavy stuff you go under or around after cutting off the stubs.the big one go's on car camps and i use that for cutting up the scrap lumber that's sold for camp fires.you can rip thru a 2x4 in no time.looking around at other camp sites i would say your not allowed to live in Minnesota without a Sven.

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#197062 - 03/03/10 06:34 AM Re: Let's hear it for the Swede saw!!! [Re: CANOEDOGS]
scafool Offline
Pooh-Bah

Registered: 12/18/08
Posts: 1534
Loc: Muskoka
I have an 18" and a 24" version of the Trail Blazer buck saw.
They pack as a single aluminum tube with everything inside, Very nice. They assemble into an effective saw very quickly.
The only problem I have had is they have a spring that acts as a pin to hold them together when packed and people seem to lose them.

I like the saws with the bow frame too but they are a bit more awkward to stow.
I used to just take the blade and a couple of nails with me sometimes.
If you have the blade you can make a frame for it.

I think the best blades you can get today are Sandvik.
I have had blades by other brands that were bad. A few years ago some blades I got from Stanley Tools were supposed to be hard point, but they were soft like butter.

I found the triangular framed saws were not quite as good as the bow saws or the square frame buck saws because the frame limited the cut.

In a lot of the hardware stores you can find small 12" bow saws now.
They come with a swede saw blade and a hacksaw blade.
Very very handy.
You get a fast and aggressive wood saw and a very determined hacksaw all in one small package.
Again, I recommend the Sandvik brand for these little bow saws. The quality is high enough to be worth paying a little bit more.
Some of the imitations have poor steel in the blades and in the frames.
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#197064 - 03/03/10 08:59 AM Re: Let's hear it for the Swede saw!!! [Re: Blast]
MostlyHarmless Offline
Old Hand

Registered: 06/03/09
Posts: 948
Loc: Norway
Originally Posted By: Blast
I have one of these and LOVE it. It's light, sharp, packs small, and carries extra blades inside the handle.
What-A-Saw
-Blast


I'm a bit uncertain if I like this patent or not. It sure works GREAT for small diameter stuff, but moving up to say 4" the triangular handle will hit the log when you're halfway through. This limits the length of the cut: You cannot use long strokes anymore, just short strokes with the middle part of the blade.

Of course, if you just think a little and look around you can usually manage just fine without cutting 4" logs and above...


Here is a foldable 12" Swede saw version that has a square handle shape:
Frisport saw review (in Norwegian)
Google translate of the review
Some words that weren't translated:
Sag = saw.
Jegersag = (hunter's saw), here it means triangular saws like What-a-saw.
TÝmmersag = timber saw (i.e. the real, big swede saw)
Puslete = Tiny, small.
Fiklete = Finicky

This patent works much better for thick logs than the triangular what-a-saw lookalikes. Robust and solid, but assembling the saw is a bit more finicky. Done in a minute, but with small parts that are easily lost. But it's lightweight and packs into a tube, yet still robust enough for proper sawing. The ideal size for this saw is birch about 2-4" in diameter (5-10 cm).


Edited by MostlyHarmless (03/03/10 09:05 AM)

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#197065 - 03/03/10 10:33 AM Re: Let's hear it for the Swede saw!!! [Re: Art_in_FL]
Byrd_Huntr Offline
~
Old Hand

Registered: 01/28/10
Posts: 1091
Loc: Land O' Lakes & Rivers, USA ...
Originally Posted By: Art_in_FL
Way back, at least where I was, most people called them a 'Sven Saw'. There was a larger bow version that was quite capable and a small and lighter folding triangular looking unit that was popular with campers and trail clearing crews. Folded you had a single aluminum bar with all the pieces or the frame and the blade stored inside.

Good product. Haven't seen one in a few years.



Still available: www.svensaw.com/

I carry a retractable saw in my pack, but in my truck I prefer the 21" non-folding tubular frame with the triangular shape. When I pack for the woods, I carry a larger bow saw as well.
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#197067 - 03/03/10 10:47 AM Re: Let's hear it for the Swede saw!!! [Re: scafool]
Byrd_Huntr Offline
~
Old Hand

Registered: 01/28/10
Posts: 1091
Loc: Land O' Lakes & Rivers, USA ...
Originally Posted By: scafool


I like the saws with the bow frame too but they are a bit more awkward to stow.
I used to just take the blade and a couple of nails with me sometimes.
If you have the blade you can make a frame for it.


You hit on something here that I was thinking about. I used to use a wooden bucksaw with my dad and brothers when I was a kid. We cleared a lot of oak off the family homestead and cut it into firewood. Although the bucksaws and two-man crosscut saws we used then are gone now, I did find a similar old wooden bucksaw at a flea market. I hang it on the wall in my garage. Although I have never done it myself, I know of old woodsmen who carry one of these, broken down and bundled with stiff wire. Out in the woods, they can make any wooden part that gets broken as long as the blade and pins are intact. I wonder if it wouldn't be smart to cache a few of these blades?
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#197106 - 03/03/10 11:13 PM Re: Let's hear it for the Swede saw!!! [Re: MostlyHarmless]
Blast Offline
INTERCEPTOR
Carpal Tunnel

Registered: 07/15/02
Posts: 3485
Loc: Spring, Texas
Quote:

I'm a bit uncertain if I like this patent or not. It sure works GREAT for small diameter stuff, but moving up to say 4" the triangular handle will hit the log when you're halfway through. This limits the length of the cut: You cannot use long strokes anymore, just short strokes with the middle part of the blade.


I used it to clear some land a few weeks ago including stuff over 10" in diameter. I just had to change the angle of attack occasionally. It went through willows and Chinese tallow trees like butter.

-Blast
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#197132 - 03/04/10 03:11 AM Re: Let's hear it for the Swede saw!!! [Re: Blast]
dougwalkabout Offline
Crazy Canuck
Pooh-Bah

Registered: 02/03/07
Posts: 2268
Loc: Alberta, Canada
This summer, I helped a friend take down three half-dead birch trees in his yard. He had a cordless reciprocating saw and I had a 21" swede saw with a sharp Sandvik blade. I easily outcut him 3-to-1; he finally gave up and worked the tagline to guide the falling chunks. Even at the top of a tall ladder, I could hug the trunk with one arm and lop off big branches with the other.

Being a cheapskate, I have tried some of the discount blades and have generally been disappointed. It's not about sharpness, it's about the inadequate "set" of the teeth, meaning that the blade binds all the time -- it will drive you nuts. I put one of these in a vise and crudely increased the set with large pliers (note: wear serious eye and face protection). It worked somewhat better, but it's more efficient to buy good stuff right off the bat.

Note that you can resharpen a Sandvik blade with a triangular file. Not as good as new, but they still cut surprisingly well. The added service life makes it easier to cough up the dough for a good blade.


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#197139 - 03/04/10 03:43 AM Re: Let's hear it for the Swede saw!!! [Re: Mac]
turbo Offline
Member

Registered: 01/27/04
Posts: 133
Loc: Oregon
You might look at the following portable buck saw:

http://www.leevalley.com/garden/page.aspx?c=2&p=44171&cat=2,42706,40721

I have had both sizes for many years. The smaller one is in my bug out bag and the larger one is in my truck. There is no springs to loose. You can also get a bone saw blade for butching. With a little finesse, you can store two blades inside when collasped. You can cut much larger diameter logs than a sven saw. Search the web for other venders for the bone blade.

My wife thinks I have every saw know to man. I do have my own wood lot, have my own band saw mill, many chain saws, inaddition to many old logging hand saws. They are all very usefull. However, I don't want to carry anyone of them, their fuel, or their maintenance supplies.

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