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#190349 - 12/09/09 08:00 PM Re: Bug Out Bike - Mt, Hybrid or Road? [Re: PureSurvival]
Jesselp Offline
What's Next?
Enthusiast

Registered: 07/19/07
Posts: 262
Loc: New York
Originally Posted By: PureSurvival
I have done a lot of racing on cobles during one day classics in Europe. Riding cobbles is no different than riding rough tracks.


All I can say it that if you've really ridden the cobbles in the Euro classics, then I am in awe.

Folks, this guy knows of what he speaks. I was an amature triathlete and avid recreational cyclist for many years. Covering 100 miles on a road bike (on the road) is trivial if you have the fitness and form. I tried to ride 100 miles on a mountain bike once (aso on the road), and it is not an experience I ever hope to repeat. I've ridden my road bike in ice, snow, dirt, and mud, and as long as you're careful you'll have no trouble. If I were to bug out by bike I'd want a sturdy touring or cyclocross bike, not a mountain bike

As complicated as a geared bike can be, I personally would never go with a fixie - I'd never get up the hills with any amount of gear, and brakes are too important (to me) for safety. I know many that disagree.
_________________________
http://spligovia.blogspot.com
A blog about adventure
in and around New York

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#190350 - 12/09/09 08:04 PM Re: Bug Out Bike - Mt, Hybrid or Road? [Re: PureSurvival]
hikermor Offline
Geezer in Chief
Geezer

Registered: 08/26/06
Posts: 6435
Loc: southern Cal
I personally would use my bike in many bug out situations, primarily because I have commuted and toured since 1970. I still typically ride 20 miles plus every day. A bike is a viable option for me, but what about my wife and daughter , who do not ride?

It is certainly useful to talk about different kinds of bikes, but the most important element in practical bike use is the motive power - the rider spinning the cranks. There are those challenged by a three mile ride, while others can knock out a century with no probs.

If you include a bike, any bike, in your disaster plans for heaven's sake, get it out and ride. While you are at it, learn how to fix flats and deal with other basic problems.

If I have to bug out on my bike, it should be just another fully loaded touring day, probably with a few novel distractions. While I am a bike fan, I still retain other options - cars and trucks have desirable aspects, too.
_________________________
Geezer in Chief

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#190351 - 12/09/09 08:11 PM Re: Bug Out Bike - Mt, Hybrid or Road? [Re: Jesselp]
hikermor Offline
Geezer in Chief
Geezer

Registered: 08/26/06
Posts: 6435
Loc: southern Cal
Originally Posted By: Jesselp
[quote=PureSurvival]As complicated as a geared bike can be, I personally would never go with a fixie - I'd never get up the hills with any amount of gear, and brakes are too important (to me) for safety. I know many that disagree.


I doubt that many would disagree. How many fixies do you see doing self supported touring, the most comparable situation to bugging out? I am sure that somewhere there is someone who carries a 60 pound load for 95 miles every day on a fixie, but that dude is pretty unusual.

I am with you on gears. I have had one derailleur problem, ever. If I had been required to treat it while on the road, I would have concerted my bike to a single gear - until I reached the nearest bike shop.
_________________________
Geezer in Chief

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#190367 - 12/09/09 09:35 PM Re: Bug Out Bike - Mt, Hybrid or Road? [Re: PureSurvival]
Am_Fear_Liath_Mor Offline
Carpal Tunnel

Registered: 08/03/07
Posts: 3077
Quote:
I would not use a mountain bike, they are heavy and cumbersome. The riding position is not great and even when running slicks they are slow.


A good mountain bike is not heavy and cumbersome, it is possible to build a sub 20lb mountain bike. Speed on the bicycle is about the amount of transmitted power to the rear wheel and the aerodynamic drag and rolling resistance. Bicycle weight has very little do with it. Even folks like Gianni Bugno would ride a 23lb Tour bicycle preferring reliability over lightweight frame, wheels and components.

Quote:
Why a fixie? Because there are no gears to go wrong and you don&#8217;t need your brakes although it is advisable to have breaks especially when you are riding using the freewheel. The chain is larger and stronger. They are good strong bikes that have nothing other than a couple of bearings to go wrong. They take skill to ride though.


Fixies are OK if riding on the flat, but not really any good for any hilly or undulating terrain. Even professional riders and elite amateurs have lost Olympic titles because they overgeared their bicycles and failed to take into account proper gearing for the terrain. Cycling efficiency and power drops away at lower cadences, which is why time trailists will keep 90-100+ rpm (something a trained cyclist does with ease whereas the inexperienced cyclist will barely maintain 60 rpm cadence). Hour riders like Graeme Obree will be over at around 100-110 rpm even though they are pushing a huge 110+ inch gear. Start to get to any hill such as a 1 in 10 or steeper then the normal 65-70 inch gear on a fixie is geared way to high to be efficient. There is no way for example you would get from the town centre of Dundee to the top of the Dundee Law with a 70 inch geared fixie (about 2 miles and I've seen tour riders virtually collapse with exhaustion trying to get to the top on a 42x17 or 19. Add 60lbs of touring gear and most would struggle to push it up on foot.)

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GBxPMU-l-v8

Quote:
A competent cyclist can cycle between 18 to 25 miles an hour for 100 to 200 miles on the same roads with ease


Getting a sub 4 hour 100 mile in a time trail is elite riding not just competent cycling and is definitely not accomplished with ease. Of course it becomes much easier riding as a group in a peloton. The difference in speed would be an additional 5-7 mph riding in a large peloton for the same effort.

Quote:
If I am buying a 200 or 6000 off the peg bike the wheels go straight in the bin and are replaced by hand tied wheels built by a competent wheel builder.


There is nothing wrong with the wheels on a good quality bicycle, throwing them away is just throwing money away. Manufacturers will use the same components as a custom builder the only difference is one is laced and tensioned on a machine an the other is done by hand (some builders will even use the proper spoke tension measurement tool and some will use just their skill of knowing what tension is just right). All that is needed is to retention the spokes to the correct amount and ensure that the rim is centered correctly and the rim is true. Just make sure that good quality components are used in first place when purchasing off the peg wheels that come with the bicycle.

Saying that I actually have a had a difficult time finding a mountain rim that actually uses stainless steel double eyelets as most of the mountain rims seem to use single eyelets. These seem to be the only ones.

http://www.dotbike.com/ProductsP6968.asp...tm_campaign=PMP

Of course spoke choice is critical, which is why I only ever use DT Swiss Single and Double butted Stainless Steel spokes.








Edited by Am_Fear_Liath_Mor (12/09/09 10:38 PM)

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#190376 - 12/09/09 11:57 PM Re: Bug Out Bike - Mt, Hybrid or Road? [Re: Am_Fear_Liath_Mor]
Russ Offline
Carpal Tunnel

Registered: 06/02/06
Posts: 4833
Loc: SOCAL
As I said in other posts, the bike I have is a hybrid of sorts and would probably be referred to as a Cross bike, but when I bought it they called it a mountain bike.

The frame looks like a typical Cro-Moly road bike frame, except it's designed to take 2" knobbie tires and it has MB handlebar, shifters and brakes. When I bought it knobbies were on the rims but I immediately switched to 2" City Slicks (world of difference on pavement) and now have 1.5" Slickasaurus tires which ride a little better than the older slicks.

I like this configuration; it might not be as fast as a road bike, but it's comfortable and the bike can handle some abuse. As long as you don't need to be set for road racing, go with comfortable and tough.


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#190389 - 12/10/09 02:50 AM Re: Bug Out Bike - Mt, Hybrid or Road? [Re: Russ]
Dagny Offline
Pooh-Bah

Registered: 11/25/08
Posts: 1914
Loc: Washington, DC
Very instructive, Pure Survival, thanks.

I use my mountain bikes for bikejoring but if at some point I want to invest in a dedicated bug out bike I'll be going back over this thread very carefully.

Meanwhile, any bike beats going on foot.

Anyone else have experience with bike trailers? I have a cargo (Burley Nomad) and dog trailer (Croozer). There are many more child trailers available that could be found used and make great gear haulers.

This thread has gotten me researching bike touring -- there's a treasure trove of information to be found in that realm.





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#190423 - 12/10/09 06:28 PM Re: Bug Out Bike - Mt, Hybrid or Road? [Re: Dagny]
Greg_Sackett Offline
Enthusiast

Registered: 12/14/01
Posts: 225
Loc: KC, MO
Dagny,

The Burley Nomad is one of the best cargo haulers out there, especially if you like 2 wheelers. The BOB is a good trailer, but many people are uncomfortable with the single wheel trailers. It's all personal preference, they will both haul a ton of gear.

I am more of a pannier person, but I have a Burley Solo that I haul my daughters in. My 6 year old has upgraded to the Burley Piccolo trail-a-bike. So I pull her and my wife pulls my 2 year old in the trailer.

Bike touring is a blast, and is pretty much all the cycling I do now. I started out riding MTBs, then switched to roadie and have evolved into touring. I built up both of my tourers from frame, one as an "off road" tourer for trails and one more road focused. I should probably bring one of them to work and leave it at the office. Not sure what my office mate would stay about that...

If you want to tap into a ton of touring wisdom and can handle an email list, sign up for the Phred list. You will learn everything you ever wanted to know about touring from people who have literally ridden around the world.

Greg

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#190424 - 12/10/09 06:35 PM Re: Bug Out Bike - Mt, Hybrid or Road? [Re: Greg_Sackett]
Dagny Offline
Pooh-Bah

Registered: 11/25/08
Posts: 1914
Loc: Washington, DC

Thanks for the info, Greg.

What bike frames are you riding now?




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#190434 - 12/10/09 08:20 PM Re: Bug Out Bike - Mt, Hybrid or Road? [Re: Dagny]
Jesselp Offline
What's Next?
Enthusiast

Registered: 07/19/07
Posts: 262
Loc: New York
Originally Posted By: Dagny

This thread has gotten me researching bike touring -- there's a treasure trove of information to be found in that realm.


Dagny,

I know I sort of bashed mountain bikes in my earlier post, but. . .

The most fun I have ever had on two wheels was when two friends and I loaded up our camping gear on the back of some mountain bikes and spent three days on the Continental Divide Trail in Montana high country.

Very little single track - mostly gravel forest service roads. We camped by the side of the road, got chased by irate cattle, worried about bears, and rode the bikes across at least one stream we had to ford sans bridge.

All in all, an experience I cannot recommend more highly. I'm sure more traditional road touring is a blast too!
_________________________
http://spligovia.blogspot.com
A blog about adventure
in and around New York

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#190441 - 12/10/09 09:02 PM Re: Bug Out Bike - Mt, Hybrid or Road? [Re: Jesselp]
Dagny Offline
Pooh-Bah

Registered: 11/25/08
Posts: 1914
Loc: Washington, DC

Wow, Jesselp - that sounds like a sensational experience.

I'd be happy in Montana on any bike.



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