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#189125 - 11/24/09 08:58 PM Snow Shoes
Adventureboy Offline
Journeyman

Registered: 11/18/09
Posts: 51
Loc: Peoria, AZ ,USA
Hey Y'all
I am hoping to take a 4 day 3 nite expedition later this year or early next and am looking for some snow shoes. I am not looking for a free ride but would like something in the 50$ or less range confused maybe ???? and this is probably obvious but..... they can be used. They need to fit a 10.5 hunting boot for a 5'6" person (i.e. Me). If anyone can help I would be most greatful. The purpose of this trip is to practice survival in the snow near the mogillon rim. Advice would also be appreciated. Also anyone want to join me we can possibly make arrangements for that (PM me).

Adventureboy


Edited by ZPadventureboy (11/24/09 09:12 PM)
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#189131 - 11/24/09 10:19 PM Re: Snow Shoes [Re: NightHiker]
MostlyHarmless Offline
Old Hand

Registered: 06/03/09
Posts: 982
Loc: Norway
A big advantage of renting that kind of gear is that you can try out different types and find out what works best for you. If you later decide to buy your own then you know what to look for.

If you do this only once a year then you're probably better off renting the snow shoes than buying a brand new one.

Also, there is usually lots of used equipment for sale if you just look for it.

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#189134 - 11/24/09 11:41 PM Re: Snow Shoes [Re: MostlyHarmless]
dougwalkabout Offline
Crazy Canuck
Carpal Tunnel

Registered: 02/03/07
Posts: 2921
Loc: Alberta, Canada
You could start asking on Craigslist and Kijiji. You might be surprised.

Where is your trip, and what kind of conditions do you expect? The type of snow makes a big difference in the snowshoe you need.

In your planning, keep in mind that your M.P.H. will be considerably less than a hike on a trail. Snowshoeing is hard work, especially in powder. And if there's a freeze-thaw cycle, you get a horror known as "breakable crust" that will drive you insane.

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#189143 - 11/25/09 12:48 AM Re: Snow Shoes [Re: dougwalkabout]
unimogbert Offline
Old Hand

Registered: 08/10/06
Posts: 864
Loc: Colorado
Originally Posted By: dougwalkabout

In your planning, keep in mind that your M.P.H. will be considerably less than a hike on a trail. Snowshoeing is hard work, especially in powder. And if there's a freeze-thaw cycle, you get a horror known as "breakable crust" that will drive you insane.


YES!!!

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#189160 - 11/25/09 03:38 AM Re: Snow Shoes [Re: unimogbert]
dweste Offline
Pooh-Bah

Registered: 02/16/08
Posts: 2463
Loc: Central California
Your weight is critical to a good fit.

I would strongly suggest at least 1 day trip and 1 overnight to get used to conditions and gear before doing any multi-day winter expedition. Many practical lessons will make themselves clear.


Edited by dweste (11/25/09 03:48 AM)

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#189192 - 11/25/09 04:18 PM Re: Snow Shoes [Re: dweste]
TeacherRO Offline
Pooh-Bah

Registered: 03/11/05
Posts: 2480
+1 rental. Check your local outdoors store or college.

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#189225 - 11/26/09 12:59 AM Re: Snow Shoes [Re: NightHiker]
scafool Offline
Pooh-Bah

Registered: 12/18/08
Posts: 1534
Loc: Muskoka
OK. I am too far away from you to lend a pair of raquettes.
I have sometimes seen workable pairs in Surplus stores.
I have seen lots of pairs for sale used too. The biggest problem for me is getting them big enough.

The best ones I found in army surplus were made with magnesium frames in an Algonquin pattern. Coated steel cable was used to weave the decks.
The long tails counterbalance the deck and drag easily through the snow when you take a step. They are very effective at keeping the shoes in line.

I still like the patterns with long tails better than bearpaw patterns, but that is up to you and depends on terrain.
Most of the modern styles are more like the beavertail patterns. and the back of the frames drag a bit harder than the Algonquin styles.

Get either the neoprene or the plastic decked snowshoes if you can though.
They are lighter than the babiche decks and even more importantly they don't load up as badly from snow sifting up through them.
The fact that they don't need waterproofing or go loose and flabby when damp is a good thing too.

Remember to try them for a mile before committing to a long solitary trip. People are usually surprised at how much work lifting a snowshoe with every step you take is.

It is that lifting of your feet which makes skis easier to use for travel even though skis are not as easy to do work from.

Some things about skis to consider.
The biggest problem with skis is still the binding/boot system.
With snowshoes the binding is simple and almost any low heeled boot can work. (shoepacks or mukluks are very good)
Most skis require expensive mechanical traps and special boots to work right.
You might be able to find old skis with bindings that accept hiking or work boots but those bindings tend to increase the risk of sprain injuries to knees and ankles. (even fractures)
They are usually not stiff enough for good control going downhill either.
What you might look for are X-country/backcountry/telemark.
You will be after something that is a blend of them.X-country are usually too light and telemark are usually too heavy.
There are tons of second hand skis available. Sometimes the outfitters like MEC or REI have good deals on traded pairs in their stores. I know MEC has an online swap/sell service
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#189243 - 11/26/09 08:15 AM Re: Snow Shoes [Re: scafool]
MostlyHarmless Offline
Old Hand

Registered: 06/03/09
Posts: 982
Loc: Norway
Originally Posted By: scafool

It is that lifting of your feet which makes skis easier to use for travel even though skis are not as easy to do work from.


Yes... and exactly why I haven't done much snow shoeing. I've tried and I enjoy it, but it is just too boring compared with skiing. I haven't that many skiing oportunities, why should I waste them doing stomp-lift-stomp-lift... ?

Originally Posted By: scafool

You might be able to find old skis with bindings that accept hiking or work boots but those bindings tend to increase the risk of sprain injuries to knees and ankles. (even fractures)
They are usually not stiff enough for good control going downhill either.


Forget about them, they are so inferior to dedicated skiing boots that you don't really want to know. It's like comparing one of these:


with a modern offroad bike.

Originally Posted By: scafool


What you might look for are X-country/backcountry/telemark.
You will be after something that is a blend of them.X-country are usually too light and telemark are usually too heavy.


+1.

Choosing skis more or less boils down to these criteria:
- The width of the ski
- The flexibility versus "spring" of the ski (How hard does it bounce back when you bend it out of sh

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#189264 - 11/26/09 10:15 PM Re: Snow Shoes [Re: MostlyHarmless]
CANOEDOGS Offline
Pooh-Bah

Registered: 02/03/07
Posts: 1852
Loc: MINNESOTA
a couple things..i have a pair of snowshoes i got in Canada some twenty or so years ago,they have a webbing made from yellow plastic rope and seem to work very well.they have not worn out very much and snow does not stick to the web as much as my wife's rawhide ones,which she replaced with the new kind with the flat plastic bottoms and big metal gripper.i always take a ski pole when i snowshoe in wooded areas for balance when crossing fallen trees or working up and down hills..and..snowshoes were made so people could work in the winter on trap lines or cutting wood.how they became a "sport" item is beyond me,unless your in deep snow or in the brush skis are much better for winter travel and i think that a short-wide ski is now made which work much better that either for winter hiking.

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#189268 - 11/27/09 12:15 AM Re: Snow Shoes [Re: CANOEDOGS]
UpstateTom Offline
Member

Registered: 10/05/09
Posts: 165
Loc: Rens. County, NY
Do any of you carry snowshoes in your car for work or emergencies? Would there be any point to it for someone without much or any experience?



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