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#188624 - 11/19/09 11:21 AM Re: Advice on hydration equipment options [Re: Pete]
MostlyHarmless Offline
Old Hand

Registered: 06/03/09
Posts: 982
Loc: Norway
Originally Posted By: Pete

In an pinch - always remember that your basic large-size plastic soda bottle will hold a LOT of water. The plastic they use to make those bottles is incredibly tough and tear-resistant. Of course, if possible wash it out first - so you can remove the after-taste of the soda. And I don't like the narrow neck of those soda bottles. But Hey, let's not be picky if we're talkin' a real emergency here ... then those bottles are tough, hold a lot of water, and get the job done.


That's what I use - in fact, recyclable drink containers are about ALL I use. I also have a 15 liter collapsible water bag and a 5 liter plastic can for those big outings and campings. One of the biggest brands of bottled water has quite sturdy recyclable bottles with a drinking cap - that is my favorite water bottle. Soda bottles are much stronger because they have to withstand the high pressure, but I don't drink soda (ever! Don't like it!) and I don't like that I have to unscrew the cork whenever I have a drink. Whenever the bottle is funky I buy a new one.


But I'm lucky to live in a place where water treatment is no fuss, really. The tap water is first class most places, just fill your bottle. Outside of urban areas you just find a nice stream, consider if there's any obvious manmade source of nastiness upstream and if not, drink it. Obviously, a lot of places where that strategy is not recommended.


The platylus kind of system is tempting because drink is always instant available without effort - you don't need the self discipline of retrieving your water bottle. Too high tech for me... I'd rather go low tech, low maintenance and getting into the habit of drinking often, no matter the inconvenience.

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#188636 - 11/19/09 02:28 PM Re: Advice on hydration equipment options [Re: MostlyHarmless]
comms Offline
Veteran

Registered: 07/23/08
Posts: 1502
Loc: Mesa, AZ
Was a Camelbak fan for years, still am of their packs but not so much for their reservoirs. Busted one up and went with Platypus instead; zip top, carry handle, lighter. However I have found recently that even sipping every ten minutes I still do not get enough water in me for my requirements and get dehydrated long term in the day.

I now use Nalgene bottles when ever I can, I can easily monitor how much I take in. Two on me plus a 2 liter platypus platy-bottle in my pack. With 2x 30 oz Nalgenes and 1x 30-60 oz platy-bottle I carry as much as 100 oz hydration reservoir but drink better.
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#188638 - 11/19/09 03:10 PM Re: Advice on hydration equipment options [Re: Mark_F]
plsander Offline
Newbie

Registered: 08/26/04
Posts: 38
I was out at Philmont this summer...

I carried:
1 L Nalgene
2 L Platypus bladder
3 L Platypus bladder
and a pump filter.

Neither of my platypus have the zip opening -- just the screw on fitting for the hose.

I found that I could remove the bite valve and plug the hose into the filter to fill the bladders.

The upcoming days water outlook determined which vessels I filled.

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#188639 - 11/19/09 03:22 PM Re: Advice on hydration equipment options [Re: MostlyHarmless]
Mark_F Offline
Old Hand

Registered: 06/24/09
Posts: 714
Loc: Kentucky
Good stuff. Thanks for the input so far. Perhaps a little more info to muddy the water (yes, pun intended, sorry). The reasons I lean toward the GI canteen are:
1) Convenient size for day hikes
2) The carry pouch has extra pockets for water purification tablets and other accessories.
3) The canteen cup nests in the bottom with no additional space requirements.
4) A canteen cup stove can be added as well; it also nests so no additional space requirements.

The reasons I lean toward Nalgene (or possibly other bottles):
1) About the same capacity as the canteen.
2) A carry pouch with extra accessory pockets is available
3) A metal cup is available that nests in the bottom
4) Measurement markings on the bottle (mostly for cooking reasons, but also to monitor hydration if needed)
5) Compatibility with filtering systems
6) Compatibility with scouting

The reasons I lean toward a hydration bladder:
1) Constant hydration via drinking tube and bite valve
2) Carry in a pack on your back
3) Good or better capacity

My concerns with the canteen:
1) Small neck and can't see the nasties inside (if there was any funky stuff growing in there I may not know it)
2) Incompatibility with filtering systems (although I believe several of you have mentioned this is not something I should be worried about)
3) Incompatibility with scouting
4) No measurement marks

My concerns with the nalgene:
1) No nesting stove (although I'm fairly certain a small stove wouldn't be too much trouble to take along)

My concerns with the hydration bladder:
1) Difficulties cleaning
2) Difficulties removing water for cooking or other uses
3) No measurement markings
4) No cup or stove unless I pack it along
5) Compatibility with other backpacks
6) Filtering compatibility
7) Scouting compatibility

For the record I already have two GI canteens and a bladder with its own pack (no other room except for the bladder but does have molle attachments). I bought it on e-bay for a song and dance but I am not really sure how compatible it is with other back packs as I mentioned above. Do I remove the bladder itself and place it in another backpack or leave it in it's current pack and attach it to my main pack or wear my main pack over top of the water bladder pack(I really don't think so on the last as this seems really uncomfortable)? I am more familiar and comfortable with canteens or bottles than the hydration bladders but perhaps with time I could learn. I just don't want to invest any more money without some input. Based on this comparison the nalgene appears to be a better choice but I am still interested in what everyone else has to say. Also I know there are other threads on the subject but as I suspected there seems to be some new products and new opinions. It may seem a mundane topic but no one will question the importance of hydration. Based on my observations here and the original premise of the thread does anyone have any other insights? I appreciate everyone who has taken/is taking the time to contribute.
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#188643 - 11/19/09 04:52 PM Re: Advice on hydration equipment options [Re: Mark_F]
Pete Offline
Veteran

Registered: 02/20/09
Posts: 1372
..."My concerns with the nalgene:
1) No nesting stove (although I'm fairly certain a small stove wouldn't be too much trouble to take along)"
----------------------------------------------------

Actually, it now turns out that you can buy stainless steel cups that fit over the end of a nalgene bottle. I just discovered this myself during another thread on this forum. It's quite a smart little idea for survival gear. So yuor cup and bottle nest together.

Then in a real survival situation you use the SS cup for everything. Put it over a small fire and use it to heat soup or tea. Use some aluminum foil to seal the top to retain heat and water vapor.

I haven't bought one of these SS cups yet ... but I certainly plan to!

Pete

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#188649 - 11/19/09 06:10 PM Re: Advice on hydration equipment options [Re: Pete]
Am_Fear_Liath_Mor Offline
Carpal Tunnel

Registered: 08/03/07
Posts: 3078
Quote:
Actually, it now turns out that you can buy stainless steel cups that fit over the end of a nalgene bottle.


The Vargo Ti-lite Mug also fits quite snuggly over a Naglene Bottle and come with a lid as well.



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#188652 - 11/19/09 07:09 PM Re: Advice on hydration equipment options [Re: Pete]
Mark_F Offline
Old Hand

Registered: 06/24/09
Posts: 714
Loc: Kentucky
Originally Posted By: Pete
..."My concerns with the nalgene:
1) No nesting stove (although I'm fairly certain a small stove wouldn't be too much trouble to take along)"
----------------------------------------------------

Actually, it now turns out that you can buy stainless steel cups that fit over the end of a nalgene bottle. I just discovered this myself during another thread on this forum. It's quite a smart little idea for survival gear. So yuor cup and bottle nest together.

Then in a real survival situation you use the SS cup for everything. Put it over a small fire and use it to heat soup or tea. Use some aluminum foil to seal the top to retain heat and water vapor.

I haven't bought one of these SS cups yet ... but I certainly plan to!

Pete

I already knew about the nesting cup but there is not a stove that nests with it as well like with the GI canteen. I tend to think this would not be a real issue for the reasons you mention and also a backpack stove would not take up that much room in the kit or pack. But you gotta admit the nesting stove for the GI canteen is pretty ingenious. And there would be some benefit to having that stove on your person instead of in your pack. Anyone know of a way to make a functioning nesting stove for the Nalgene cup?
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#188653 - 11/19/09 07:23 PM Re: Advice on hydration equipment options [Re: Pete]
Am_Fear_Liath_Mor Offline
Carpal Tunnel

Registered: 08/03/07
Posts: 3078
Quote:
Metal water bottles migh be OK - but they're too heavy for me if I'm carrying a backpack.


The Tatonka Stainless Steel Water bottles are remarkably lighweight for a Stainless Steel bottle (@ 230 grams) being only 85 grams heavier than the equivalent Sigg Alu 1 litre Bottle. Problem with plastic and the lined Aluminum Siggs etc is that when all else fails the Stainless steel bottle can be heated over an open fire to boil water and provide warming drinks. The quality of the Tatonka Water bottle is excellent also.



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#188665 - 11/19/09 08:42 PM Re: Advice on hydration equipment options [Re: billvann]
Roarmeister Online   content
Old Hand

Registered: 09/12/01
Posts: 923
Loc: Saskatchewan, Canada
Originally Posted By: billvann
I use both. It's a technique I learned ...

- I have several platypus hydration bags and Nalgene bottles.
When backpacking I have a 3 litre hydration bag...
- I also carry two 2 litre platypus bags. Most of the time they are empty. Empty they take up little room and weight...
- In the other side pocket I have a large Gatorade bottle... I use this and only this bottle for smellable liquids, such as powdered Gatordae. It's easy then to make sure it goes up in the bear bag...
- For weekend trips and summer camp I have a 1 litre platypus that I stick in my day pack.


Huh??? also the same setup I use. Great minds think alike!?! laugh

For those who think that it is inconvenient to fill a bladder - I use the Platypus quick disconnect so it allows me to connect my water filter (Pur Hiker) directly to the hose of the Platypus and just pump til it's full. It's is almost as convenient as dipping the entire Platy into the a cold stream!

So an almost full 3 litre bag and a 950 ml Gatorade bottle of powered Gatorade/Powerade is roughly 8.5 lbs. I would not normally use that much water except in hot dry conditions for a full day. It also depends on how far apart the water sources are located. Why carry that much water if know the next source is only 4 hours hike away?

Finally, TANK UP! Hydrate first! Before you start out in the morning, fill that water bladder you are carrying anyway - your Stomach!


Edited by Roarmeister (11/19/09 08:51 PM)

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#188690 - 11/20/09 12:34 AM Re: Advice on hydration equipment options [Re: Roarmeister]
fooman Offline
Journeyman

Registered: 05/15/08
Posts: 78
I'll often have a 3L camelbak bladder in one pack or the other and another 1-2 Nalgenes on hand. I find I drink more often from the Camelbak

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