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#161250 - 01/04/09 03:02 PM Emergency Laundry/Dish kit
Stu Offline
I am not a P.P.o.W.
Old Hand

Registered: 05/16/05
Posts: 1058
Loc: Finger Lakes of NY State
A few things I'm adding to my emergency supplies will be some ivory snow laundry soap, a couple of bars of DR. Bonner's citrus soap,a old fashioned wash board, a rubbermaid tub to do washing, some rubber gloves (saves hands), a scrub brush, a hank of clothes line and a couple dozen clothespins, to enable me to do my wash if the power is out for a long time.

Clean clothes and bodes will help keep one healthier and may add a longer life to your clothes, towels and bedding. Clean clothes and body also may help keep your moral up.

I'm gong to place a big bottle of Dr.. Bronner's liquid peppermint soap, a stainless steel scrubber, and a couple of dish cloths in the Laundry kit, the rubbermaid container could made a nice dish "sink" container. A very small folding dish drainer rack might also be added to aid in the dish and pot drying,
_________________________
Our most important survival tool is our brain, and for many, that tool is way underused! SBRaider
Head Cat Herder

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#161260 - 01/04/09 04:00 PM Re: Emergency Laundry/Dish kit [Re: Stu]
Desperado Offline
Veteran

Registered: 11/01/08
Posts: 1530
Loc: DFW, Texas
A darn good idea...

I recently saw a Tide commercial talking about the mobile laundry truck the company established after Katrina. It has since been put to use in the Texas gulf coast region after Ike. The folks mentioned just how nice clean clothes and linen is, and what is does for morale.
_________________________
I do the things that I must, and really regret, are unfortunately necessary.

RIP OBG

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#161264 - 01/04/09 04:09 PM Re: Emergency Laundry/Dish kit [Re: Stu]
Arney Offline
Pooh-Bah

Registered: 09/15/05
Posts: 2485
Loc: California
Yeah, clean clothes are great for morale. Are you going to store more water than before, now that you've added these laundry supplies? Or do you have a well or some other local water source to use for laundry?

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#161272 - 01/04/09 04:39 PM Re: Emergency Laundry/Dish kit [Re: Arney]
CANOEDOGS Offline
Pooh-Bah

Registered: 02/03/07
Posts: 1852
Loc: MINNESOTA
for soap try Campsuds..it's one of those "no soap"soaps..it comes in larger bottles than us campers use.it really go's far,a few drops will wash clothes and it leaves no perfume like smells.
without getting into the details i can stand on my well worn canoeing clothes,pour water over myself and wash with a few drops of this stuff while stomping the wet clothes,rinse with another cooking pot of water and hang my gear on a branch to dry and it's fit to wear.it's not like running them thru the washer at home but for someone living outdoors it works just fine and nylon fishing shirts and pants dry fast--

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#161295 - 01/04/09 06:34 PM Re: Emergency Laundry/Dish kit [Re: CANOEDOGS]
DesertFox Offline
Enthusiast

Registered: 01/04/07
Posts: 339
Loc: New York, NY
We have a lot of those five gallon plastic buckets that paint, drywall plaster etc. comes in. One of those makes a great container for a wash kit, if size isn't a major consideration. Good to have around for extra water carrying capacity, or as an emergency toilet. If size is a factor, the tupperware sounds good.

+1 on the camp suds. That stuff comes in handy in a lot of situations. Even camping trips.

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#161304 - 01/04/09 07:33 PM Re: Emergency Laundry/Dish kit [Re: Stu]
philip Offline
Addict

Registered: 09/19/05
Posts: 639
Loc: San Francisco Bay Area
As I think back, it's amazing how many reporters got into New Orleans after Katrina to do interviews, but nobody could get in to do repairs and rescues. C'est la vie.

Anyway, about laundry - it depends on where you are. In New Orleans, no one could do laundry for many reasons, so they just went to the local store and looted clothes from there. The police stood by as long as you were taking necessaries - they understood the necessity. Looters of liquor and drugs were arrested, but people looting groceries and clothes were allowed.

I would say clean clothes, clean dishes, and clean bodies are more than moral boosters. Cleanliness helps keep you from getting sick when there's no hope for medical attention. Cleanliness is _especially_ necessary for long term survival after a devastating storm, earthquake, whatever. The problem is getting and keeping clean water.


Edited by philip (01/04/09 07:33 PM)

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#161318 - 01/04/09 08:18 PM Re: Emergency Laundry/Dish kit [Re: Stu]
scafool Offline
Pooh-Bah

Registered: 12/18/08
Posts: 1534
Loc: Muskoka
The best thing about that list is that they are all standard household items that can be used in the house.
Only the clothes pins and washboard are a bit odd.
I would hang them on a wall and if anybody asks then brag about my beginning antique collection.
The soaps and so on are just extra household supplies.
This should be easy to do.

Just a thought here.
Nothing says your emergency supplies need to be stored away never to be used.
All you need is to have them available and enough on hand to last until your supply lines are open again.
It is better if you use your supplies and keep restocking as you use it.
If you don't do that you will end up with product that is unusable due to age if anything does happen.
You will also find out what supplies you will actually use.
The only exception I can think of is things like mineral spirits (better than Kerosene for oil lamps and Kerosene stoves)unless you use enough of it as paint thinner to have some turnover, and it stores exceptionally well anyhow. (the odorless mineral spirits, they sell more of it so it is cheaper yet it is refined more so it does not gum up oil lamps or stoves. It is usualy sold as paint thinner in the building supply or painters supply stores)

I think of it more like how my Grandmother kept her pantry on the farm.
She was stocked up with food enough for the winter in the cellar (carrots, apples, potatoes), the pantry had at least a two month supply of staples like flour, and she had many shelves with canning, pickles and preserves.
When My Grandparents retired and moved into town one of the first things my grandfather did was cut a hole through the basement wall and make a root cellar. Grandma had at least two bottles of everything and bought a new bottle when she emptied one of them. The same thing with dried stuff like beans or flour.
So buy what you use, but keep a stock of it on handy.

_________________________
May set off to explore without any sense of direction or how to return.

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#161325 - 01/04/09 08:32 PM Re: Emergency Laundry/Dish kit [Re: CANOEDOGS]
scafool Offline
Pooh-Bah

Registered: 12/18/08
Posts: 1534
Loc: Muskoka
Canoedogs:
Glad to hear you are a clothing stomper too. A lot of people never think of it as a way to wash clothes.
I found campsuds or soaps didn't burn my feet but some of the regular laundry detergents did.
_________________________
May set off to explore without any sense of direction or how to return.

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#161340 - 01/04/09 09:44 PM Re: Emergency Laundry/Dish kit [Re: scafool]
Dan_McI Offline
Old Hand

Registered: 12/10/07
Posts: 844
Loc: NYC
A few things I add to a kit for keeping clothes and you clean:

1. glycerin soap, it is a gentler but effective soap, imo;
2. woolite, which are in my travel shaving kit, etc. for clothes;
3. a big stainless steel pot, dishes steeped in hot water cleanup easy, esp. when you add some dishsoap; and
4. baking soda, which has many uses.

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#161351 - 01/04/09 11:35 PM Re: Emergency Laundry/Dish kit [Re: Dan_McI]
Eugene Offline
Carpal Tunnel

Registered: 12/26/02
Posts: 2840
I always carry small sample or travel size of soaps and such with me when we go places, so many places have stuff with perfumes and other such scents and smells. I'll get a travel size bottle and refill it.
With little kids who are always making messes and getting dirty I have a small sink and 7 gallon water jug to wash up in. I had taken it out for winter and we had a record high temperature weekend and went to a local park and my almost three year old was stranding by the tailgate wanting the water and sink to clean off.

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