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#145683 - 08/24/08 07:48 PM Re: Indefinite survival on the water [Re: samhain]
OldBaldGuy Offline
Geezer

Registered: 09/30/01
Posts: 5695
Loc: Former AFB in CA, recouping fr...
"...Is it even feasible to grow any types of plants while on a boat?..."

Beats me. But I wonder if being in a salt water environment might be bad for any plants? I know that stuff grows on shore near the ocean, but would plants on a boat get more saltwater on them???
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#145684 - 08/24/08 07:49 PM Re: Indefinite survival on the water [Re: wildman800]
OldBaldGuy Offline
Geezer

Registered: 09/30/01
Posts: 5695
Loc: Former AFB in CA, recouping fr...
I learn something new here every day!!!
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#145691 - 08/24/08 08:46 PM Re: Indefinite survival on the water [Re: dweste]
beadles Offline
Member

Registered: 04/09/06
Posts: 105
Loc: Richardson, TX
Get your ham radio license, and you can use WinLink and APRS over HF radio. Winlink is a packet radio email system. APRS is a global positioning & information service that can be accessed over HF radio. Both are free to use, worldwide, and can help supplement your personal safety.

http://www.winlink.org/
http://aprs.org/

There are a number of low power radios. Yaesu makes some tiny, popular HF radios like the FT-857 & FT-817. Both radios can run off of battery packs.
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John Beadles, N5OOM
Richardson, TX

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#145692 - 08/24/08 08:51 PM Re: Indefinite survival on the water [Re: dweste]
Fitzoid Offline
Enthusiast

Registered: 08/23/05
Posts: 289
Loc: WI, MA, and NYC
Crabbing has complex rules based on season, species, requirements for traps (e.g, no bait and hooks for crabs), etc.

Don't draw the ire of the fishcoppers; find out your local laws. And for God's sake, don't annoy professional crabbers! smile

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"When I read about the evils of drinking, I gave up reading." Henny Youngman

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#145769 - 08/25/08 03:18 AM Re: Indefinite survival on the water [Re: samhain]
Stu Offline
I am not a P.P.o.W.
Old Hand

Registered: 05/16/05
Posts: 1058
Loc: Finger Lakes of NY State
Originally Posted By: samhain
wildman,

Is it even feasible to grow any types of plants while on a boat?


A bucket of herbs will grow nicely on a sailboat, just try to keep it out of the salt spray. You can also use a clear or opaque bottle to grown sprouts.
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Our most important survival tool is our brain, and for many, that tool is way underused! SBRaider
Head Cat Herder

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#145770 - 08/25/08 03:42 AM Re: Indefinite survival on the water [Re: dweste]
Stu Offline
I am not a P.P.o.W.
Old Hand

Registered: 05/16/05
Posts: 1058
Loc: Finger Lakes of NY State
Originally Posted By: dweste
What other kinds of things can be done to be able to survive indefinitely on the water?

Thoughts?

Thanks.

Learn your boat, learn your boat, learn your boat. Learn to do most if not all of the repairs needed for your boat, and have the tools to do them on board with you.
Set up a rain water collection system, that is not contaminated by salt water. Learn what types of easily obtainable sea plants are edible. Have a serious fishing kit on board, with good salt water tackle and poles/reels. Convert all interior lighting to LED's if you can, will save on battery power. Figure out what power you will need for your fridge/freezer or how long ice will last in your cooler.
If using propane to cook, make sure you set the stove/tanks up properly for a boat and be sure to have a explosive fume alarm. Alcohol stoves will burn rubbing alcohol, and even grain alcohol in a pinch.
You might want a Bimini top or sun shade, as the sun WILL be a bear long term.
Make sure your tender/dingy is in very good shape, and all of your rigging is top notch. You are looking at a used boat, so have a GOOD marine mechanic do a full survey.
There are many books out there about long distance crusing/living aboard boats, check out the library/ebay. They may help you with long term living on a boat. Boats are small in the living area over long term, and will seem even smaller when you load your gear in them. Can you comfortably live in 1 room, because that's about what living on a boat is??
Find a good marina, and spend some time there, getting to know what they sell, what they can or can't fix, and ask questions of other boaters AND the marina staff.

I've been looking at long term living on a boat also, and these are a few of the things I've come up with.


Edited by SBRaider (08/25/08 03:44 AM)
_________________________
Our most important survival tool is our brain, and for many, that tool is way underused! SBRaider
Head Cat Herder

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#145771 - 08/25/08 04:39 AM Re: Indefinite survival on the water [Re: Stu]
wildman800 Offline
Carpal Tunnel

Registered: 11/09/06
Posts: 2811
Loc: La-USA
SBRaider reminds me of couple of space saving things that I used:

I hung nylon hammocks along the bulkheads in the V berth aznd in the main Salon. I kept my clothes (rolled up) in the V berth hammocks. They are actually hung from the overhead and alongside of the hulls (bulkhead) on each side so that they were above and on each side of the V berth and thus out of the way.

I hung 1 hammock in the same fashion in the main Salon and kept towels, washcloths, dish towels, and odds and ends in there.

I hung a set of hanging baskets in the Galley area to keep my potatoes, onions, and other vegetables in.

On the towboats, we keep our potatoes and onions (usually on the fantail) in milk crates, suspended from the Texas Deck overhang.
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The best luck is what you make yourself!

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#145772 - 08/25/08 06:56 AM Re: Indefinite survival on the water [Re: dweste]
Raspy Offline
Enthusiast

Registered: 01/08/04
Posts: 351
Loc: Centre Hall Pa
Here is a forum that deals with living on board. They can probably answer your questions or already have. You might have a lot of catch up reading to do. Living Aboard Forums

If you are thinking of using a windmill you will want to use a Savonius type rotor. This is a vertical axis style rather than a bladed one. Meaning less interference with the sails. I've posted several links on this thread. Vertical Axis Wind Turbines

Fresh water will always be one of the critical factors. A rain catchment system is a very good idea. But then again you can never count on rain when you need it.

Whether you are using a solar distiller or a reverse osmosis system to purify water. be very careful of the water you start with. They might work fine on normal seawater. But may be overwhelmed by a spill or dump from other shipping. And never take in ocean water while in port. It will probably be a real witches brew. You will most likely poison yourself and destroy your filter.

Use any and all strategies to reduce your power consumption. Such as already mentioned LED lighting.

Also consider an alternate power source. I.e. a portable generator. Yes many boats have an auxiliary engine that can also generate electricity. But you want a back up. You may need to power a radio to yell for help and your kicker is dead. This could be a commercial genny. Or a homebuilt 12 volt. It would be made from a lawn mower engine and a car alternator to charge your battery bank.

Make sure you have waterproof storage for everything not actually in use. Even double protection if possible. Bucketed or boxed with bags inside. Flooding even minor is not only possible but very likely.
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When in danger or in doubt
run in circles scream and shout
RAH

And always remember TANSTAAFL

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#145794 - 08/25/08 02:09 PM Re: Indefinite survival on the water [Re: wildman800]
Stu Offline
I am not a P.P.o.W.
Old Hand

Registered: 05/16/05
Posts: 1058
Loc: Finger Lakes of NY State
Originally Posted By: wildman800
SBRaider reminds me of couple of space saving things that I used:

I hung nylon hammocks along the bulkheads in the V berth aznd in the main Salon. I kept my clothes (rolled up) in the V berth hammocks. They are actually hung from the overhead and alongside of the hulls (bulkhead) on each side so that they were above and on each side of the V berth and thus out of the way.

I hung 1 hammock in the same fashion in the main Salon and kept towels, washcloths, dish towels, and odds and ends in there.

I hung a set of hanging baskets in the Galley area to keep my potatoes, onions, and other vegetables in.

On the towboats, we keep our potatoes and onions (usually on the fantail) in milk crates, suspended from the Texas Deck overhang.

Wildman,
Thanks, I forgot to mention those. He may also want to have a line or webbing in the galley area to lean against just in case the boat is healed (sp?) over or in rough water.
A very good set of foul weather gear will come in as a very hand item to have. A few oil lanterns, or LED battery lanterns mounted so they can swivel and be used if the batteries fail is a nice addition.

Look for books by Lin & Larry Pardey, they have a few nice long distance cruising books. Here is a almost complete version in a PDF file on the "Care and Feeding of a Sailing Crew" by the Pardey's.
http://books.google.com/books?id=G4SI23Q...1&ct=result HERE
_________________________
Our most important survival tool is our brain, and for many, that tool is way underused! SBRaider
Head Cat Herder

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#145800 - 08/25/08 02:47 PM Re: Indefinite survival on the water [Re: Stu]
Stu Offline
I am not a P.P.o.W.
Old Hand

Registered: 05/16/05
Posts: 1058
Loc: Finger Lakes of NY State
All plates and drinking glasses should be Plastic. No glass on a rocking boat.
You can use Lock-N-Lock containers or other waterproof containers and store stuff carefully in the bilges if you need extra room. Keep things organized, a neat boat will be far more comfortable than a messy one.
A fixed or temporary clothes line will help dry wet items with good ole solar power.
If you have a ice box, BLOCK ICE works better than cubes, and remember, the ice goes up high in the icebox.
Have a few more ABC fire extinguishers than required in strategic locations around the cockpit and cabin ares, just in case.
When on the boat IMHO every one should have a sharp fixed blade knife and a set of wire cutter (side cutters) pliers or a quality multi-tool on their person at all times. A rule on my boat. You never know when you might get tangled in the rigging or lines. A few seconds saved can save you life.
Don't forget a weather alert radio.
Spray covers for your dingy/tender will help keep you and your gear dry during shore trips.



Edited by SBRaider (08/25/08 02:53 PM)
_________________________
Our most important survival tool is our brain, and for many, that tool is way underused! SBRaider
Head Cat Herder

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