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#133880 - 05/28/08 04:38 AM Re: BOB clothes [Re: 91gdub]
Chris Kavanaugh Offline
Carpal Tunnel

Registered: 02/09/01
Posts: 3824
A lightwieght military style poncho is my base item. It is far from the best dedicated rain gear, but for dual purpose use as a floor for my siltarp it is invaluable. G.I. wool watchcap and glove liners are again very light and compact. A warm head and fingers may give me a few moments of TUC to get 'squared away' in foul weather. Likewise a wool scarf can add comfort and venting for little space. If two pair of socks are good, 3 are better and a wool shirt and pants, some thin woolen longjohns( two piece are easier for toilet calls, but one piece is warmer and faster to put on for me)have me literally covered. Living in California where everyday is 'Casual Friday' I am actually overdressed compared to everyone else in warm weather. It's the cold I worry about.I hopefully can grab a coat. But if not, a thin shirt and woolen can be improved upon with my secret insulating material WIGGY hasn't heard of. It's called crumpled newspaper stuffed in between a thin shirt and the woolen.

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#133882 - 05/28/08 05:49 AM Re: BOB clothes [Re: MDinana]
Jeff_M Offline
Addict

Registered: 07/18/07
Posts: 665
Loc: Northwest Florida
Originally Posted By: MDinana
Originally Posted By: Jeff_McCann


In my car is a complete nomex fifefighter uniform and a NDMS-DMAT uniform, with jumpboots and towel/washcloth and shower suuplies, plus swimshorts and beachwear.

Jeff


I REALLY hope you're talking the "brush suit" sort of nomex, not the structural gear. Otherwise, you're going to overheat like crazy!

Though come to think of it, I have a structural-type jacket I used to keep in my car, along with nomex gloves. Was an EMT-jacket, but fire-retardant. Not as warm on a cold night as one would think, but definetely hot on a hot day (in CA, no less, with it's dry heat)


Nah. Just my station uniform, in case I get called in unexpectedly. My structural and wildland gear gear stays at work.

Jeff

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#133997 - 05/29/08 02:16 AM Re: BOB clothes [Re: Jeff_M]
Ors Offline
Namu (Giant Tree)
Addict

Registered: 09/16/05
Posts: 639
Loc: SoCal, USA
These are all good suggestions...I had to ask because I'm a big guy and I sweat if I think the word "warm". I know I'll need enough so my clothes don't walk on their own, but at the same time, my clothes take up a lot of room when packed. Lucky for me that I don't get cold easily, so I can hang in shorts comfortably longer than a lot of people. Maybe a pair of those new tac zip off pants I just saw an ad for...cover more bases with one garment...

And being in Iowa, I'll have to change contents slightly with the seasons. We can go weeks with the temp below zero and weeks with temps in the 90's and 100's with high humidity. There are places colder and hotter, but we have such a broad range...

Has anyone considered a packable jacket like the 5.11 kind? For me, that would be a three season deal...keep rain at bay, for a while at least, as well as wind... doesn't look like they take up much space and I think they are only $20 or so...

I think I'm going to be hijacking my own thread, but what do you do for water? Purification methods, or carry some and purify some? Since a drought is predicted this year...I'm thinking about for the whole family too...hard to convince young ones that they need to drink nasty looking water...even if it is purified as well as can be.
_________________________
Ors, MAE, MT-BC
Memento mori
Vulnerant omnes, ultima necat (They all wound, the last kills)

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#133998 - 05/29/08 02:37 AM Re: BOB clothes [Re: Ors]
Jeff_M Offline
Addict

Registered: 07/18/07
Posts: 665
Loc: Northwest Florida
Originally Posted By: Ors


I think I'm going to be hijacking my own thread, but what do you do for water? Purification methods, or carry some and purify some? Since a drought is predicted this year...I'm thinking about for the whole family too...hard to convince young ones that they need to drink nasty looking water...even if it is purified as well as can be.


I use a liquid iodine solution (PolarPure) in my BOB. My pocket sized kit has iodine tablets. I use a home made gravity filter set up when backpacking, but it seems to too much hassle in a bugout situation, when I plan to be on the move. I've used iodine for weeks at a time in the past, with no problems.

A bit of ascorbic acid added after the iodine has had time to work improves the palatability of the treated water, or so I'm told. I've never felt the need to try it myself. Also there is a time/dose relationship between the amount of iodine required and the time you drink it. If you let the treated water stand overnight before imbibing, and it is clean appearing water (filter through a coffee filter or cloth), you can use much less iodine.

My BOB has a 3 quart water bladder in it, but I keep it empty for hygienic reasons. Instead, I just put three 1 quart bottled waters in the bag, and replace them seasonally. That gives me 1 1/2 gallons, or about 13 pounds, of water carrying capacity.

Jeff

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#134008 - 05/29/08 03:23 AM Re: BOB clothes [Re: Ors]
Jeff_M Offline
Addict

Registered: 07/18/07
Posts: 665
Loc: Northwest Florida
Originally Posted By: Ors
. . . I'm a big guy and I sweat if I think the word "warm". I know I'll need enough so my clothes don't walk on their own, but at the same time, my clothes take up a lot of room when packed.


I'm a big guy, too (6'3" 235 lbs) and if my pores were any smaller, I'd squirt sweat. But I also REALLY don't like feeling dirty and grimy. Some of the advantages of lightweight nylon clothing over cotton or poly blends is that they are very cool and breathable, dry in a flash, and are very compact. One underappreciated piece of outdoor gear I ALWAYS carry is a lightweight collapsable bucket.

It has many uses: bathing, hauling water or foraged items, and clothes washing. The trick to washing oneself or one's clothing in the field is to use an easy-rinsing soap like Dr. Bronner's or Campsuds, and in a far smaller quantity than you're used to at home, because rinsing is the most water-consuming part of the process.

I am used to washing and changing my shirt, socks and underwear, and bathing every evening. All my stuff will be wearable immediately after washing, or completely dry in a short time, because none of it absorbs much water.

Jeff

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#134014 - 05/29/08 04:30 AM Re: BOB clothes [Re: Jeff_M]
Chris Kavanaugh Offline
Carpal Tunnel

Registered: 02/09/01
Posts: 3824
One thing everyone should keep in mind is our individuality, like your large frame. All of this accumulated knowledge at ETS and other resources is just that; accumulated. We all need to sort through it like so many piles of neat stuff at an old surplus store and find what (we hope) fits.What works for one person may not work quite as well for someone else.And no scenario will play out exactly like another. We just aren't going to casually set up a shelter, make 3 signal fires and then cook Earl Grey over an ESBIT stove lit with a SPARKLITE every time a Volcano erupts or our Piper Cub crashes in Alaska. Kits and our mental preparations should be in a constant state of refinement. And then we probably still screw up somewhere. The important thing is to do enough things right so that the tobasco sauce and Kendall Mint cake on Turkey Jerky casserole doesn't kill us anyway.

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#134015 - 05/29/08 05:04 AM Re: BOB clothes [Re: Chris Kavanaugh]
Jeff_M Offline
Addict

Registered: 07/18/07
Posts: 665
Loc: Northwest Florida
Great advice, Mr. Kavanaugh.

But I thought we determined that we can no longer get Kendal Mint Cake in the US, so how can I make my traditional survivalist "tobasco sauce and Kendall Mint cake on Turkey Jerky casserole"? Any alternate recipes would be appreciated.

As I think I described in a much earlier thread, my invisioned and planned for bug out scenario is actually a 90 mile journey on foot back home (assuming simply driving home is impossible for some reason), which is increasingly hardened, stocked and prepared for longer term problems. I'll want to hook up with my wife at home, if possible, even if we have to bug out from there, or I get called into federal service. The environment I face is mostly Southern woodlands, farms, swamps, river and bay crossings and small towns, and I don't face any extremes of climate except heat and humidity.

As an avid backpacker, I appreciate the inverse relationship between load and mobility. Therefore, I've set a weight limit of 30 lbs on my BOB. That will hopefully be enough get me home, or let me survive a longer trip.

Nothing I have is overtly "tactical." I and my BOB would attract no undue attention on a bus, in a store, or at a temporary shelter operation. I am also incredibly lucky to carry Federal and State Disaster credentials, and a local Fire department ID that would get me past any official roadblocks or travel restrictions, as well as a lot of specialized training that could be useful, like Advanced Disaster Life Support or Advanced Radiological Life Support, along with considerable professional experience in disasters from wildfires, to 9/11, to Katrina.

Moreover, if the feces hits the rotating impeller, I'd be called into service with the National Disaster Medical System, FL-1 Disaster Medical Assistance Team, anyway. That's why making my home safe, secure and sustainable for my wife looms large in my plans.

But I fully realize others face entirely different circumstances, such as very cold weather, or plans for more extended self-support in the boonies or in urban environments. But that makes reading about individual preps and plans so interesting and helpful.

Your advice about constant refining and re-evaluation of plans is wise, indeed. I've learned a lot from others here and made changes accordingly. I guess I'm a bit of a survival geek, and probably have enough excess gear to equip quite a few friends (sound familiar?).

Jeff




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#134036 - 05/29/08 01:25 PM Re: BOB clothes [Re: Ors]
OldBaldGuy Offline
Geezer

Registered: 09/30/01
Posts: 5695
Loc: Former AFB in CA, recouping fr...
"...jacket like the 5.11 kind...they are only $20 or so..."

You found anything from 5.11 for only $20? Where???
_________________________
OBG

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#134101 - 05/29/08 08:59 PM Re: BOB clothes [Re: OldBaldGuy]
OldBaldGuy Offline
Geezer

Registered: 09/30/01
Posts: 5695
Loc: Former AFB in CA, recouping fr...
I answered my own question, 5.11 does indeed have a packagle wind breaker for just under $20. Who wudda thunk it???
_________________________
OBG

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#134142 - 05/30/08 03:27 AM Re: BOB clothes [Re: OldBaldGuy]
z96Cobra Offline
Stranger

Registered: 01/11/08
Posts: 17
I pack my "back-up clothes" in one of those Reynolds Vacuum bags. The battery powered vacuum is about $6 at Wal-Mart and the bags are pretty cheap also. After you suck the air out, it occupies about 1/3 of the space it normally would.

Roger

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