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#132961 - 05/15/08 08:28 AM Bamboo
Jackal Offline
Member

Registered: 08/19/07
Posts: 115
Loc: cornwall UK
has anyone thought of growing/using bamboo as part of there long term prep planning. i have been stocking up on vegetable seeds and alike for several months and for some reason my mind keeps returning to bamboo. i was thinking of it as a light weight construction material, anyone have experiance using it this way. is it even a valid idea or just some daft thought:)


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#132963 - 05/15/08 09:21 AM Re: Bamboo [Re: Jackal]
Johno Offline
Enthusiast

Registered: 01/05/03
Posts: 211
Loc: Scotland
I wouldn't call it a daft idea, bamboo can be a royal pain in the arse if you don't look after it. It tends to take over when you turn your back on it. It would all depend on the area you have to grow it in, and the time you will have to grow it before using it. On a plus point its been used for construction since before records began, so its defiantly viable now.

read red mars, its even used by the first colonists.
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#132966 - 05/15/08 11:34 AM Re: Bamboo [Re: Johno]
TheSock Offline
Addict

Registered: 11/13/07
Posts: 471
Loc: London England
Ranger Rick has a design for a bamboo walking stick using the hollow compartments for storage.
Ray Mears in one of his programs said the vietnamese would fill one compartment with rice and water and the one below with charcoal so they could cook while marching.
The Sock
_________________________
The world is in haste and nears its end Wulfstan II Archbishop of York 1014.

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#132967 - 05/15/08 11:42 AM Re: Bamboo [Re: Jackal]
MartinFocazio Offline

Pooh-Bah

Registered: 01/21/03
Posts: 2148
Loc: Bucks County PA
We have an ever-growing lot of Bamboo on the north side of our property. It was there when we moved in, and it has grown despite being sub-optimal growing conditions.
Contrary to opinions that it's "uncontrollable" I find it to be a wonderfully robust plant that is providing me with greenery and exceedingly handy and free materials for many garden and yard projects. It's strong, it's light, it's attractive.
All in all, it's one of the best plants in my yard.


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#132970 - 05/15/08 12:33 PM Re: Bamboo [Re: MartinFocazio]
Hacksaw
Unregistered


What are the minimal growing conditions for Bamboo?

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#132971 - 05/15/08 12:41 PM Re: Bamboo [Re: MartinFocazio]
MichaelJ Offline
Member

Registered: 08/30/04
Posts: 114
I wish I could grow bamboo! I believe it's the ideal longterm material. If you check around there are endless uses for it. People have even made bicycles out of it. It's great for building material, making tools, furniture, fuel... the list goes on and on.
I'd recommend diversifying breeds if you can. Maybe three types, timber (for building), mid-size, and one you can eat. Here are several resources:
www.americanbamboo.org
www.bamboogarden.com
http://bamboe.robberg.nl/
Depending on where you live, there might be some local growers that can recommend breeds that do well in your area. If you hear of one that can withstand a Minnesota winter, let me know.
Happy growing.
MichaelJ


Edited by MichaelJ (05/15/08 12:42 PM)

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#132974 - 05/15/08 01:23 PM Re: Bamboo [Re: MichaelJ]
Hacksaw
Unregistered


I had no idea there were species of bamboo that could survive -29C. I might need to look into this a little further.

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#132991 - 05/15/08 04:29 PM Re: Bamboo [Re: ]
MartinFocazio Offline

Pooh-Bah

Registered: 01/21/03
Posts: 2148
Loc: Bucks County PA
Originally Posted By: Hacksaw
What are the minimal growing conditions for Bamboo?


Well, in my case, apparently dirt and rain. I do nothing - nothing at all - to propagate it. We cut it regularly, that makes MORE grow back. It has an ASTONISHINGLY FAST growth rate. In fact, I'll take some pics over the weekend to show just how fast it comes up - we're talking about several FEET in three days or less.

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#132992 - 05/15/08 04:34 PM Re: Bamboo [Re: MartinFocazio]
Arney Offline
Pooh-Bah

Registered: 09/15/05
Posts: 2485
Loc: California
Originally Posted By: martinfocazio
...we're talking about several FEET in three days or less...

Which is why people need to keep an eye on where bamboo is growing. My father-in-law got a hole poked clear through the overhanging part of his house's roof by bamboo. And I've seen a thick, concrete patio cracked in the middle by some errant bamboo that got underneat the slab. Crazy stuff!

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#132997 - 05/15/08 05:31 PM Re: Bamboo [Re: Arney]
Jackal Offline
Member

Registered: 08/19/07
Posts: 115
Loc: cornwall UK
from what little research i have done it all depends on the variety as to how agressive they grow and spread. i am thinking of it as an easy to use light weight building material but there are variteies suitable as food species Bambusa vulgaris and Phyllostachys edulis.

Bambusa vulgaris is an open clump type bamboo species with lemon yellow culms with green stripes and dark green leaves. The shoots are edible and remain buttercup yellow after cooking. It can tolerate minor frost. It is a preferred species for erosion control. It can grow up to a height of 12 m, and a thickness of 8 cm

Phyllostachys is a genus of bamboo. The species are native to Asia with a large number of species found in Central China, but can now be found in many temperate and semi-tropical areas around the world as cultivated plants or escapes from cultivation. Most of the species spread aggressively by underground rhizomes and some are considered invasive species in areas outside their native range, particularly in North America.

The stem or culm has a prominent groove, called a sulcus, that runs along the length of each segment (or internode). Because of this it is one of the most easily identifiable genera of bamboo.

There are approximately 75 species and 200 varieties and cultivars of Phyllostachys. The largest grow to be about 100 feet (30 m) tall in optimum conditions. Some of the larger species, sometimes known as "timber bamboo", are used as construction timber and for making furniture.

careful selection of the correct variteies would provide you with a continuing source of building material, which could be traded and a source of food

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