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#129307 - 04/04/08 03:10 PM Re: Food for on the Trail [Re: Am_Fear_Liath_Mor]
LumpyJaw Offline
Journeyman

Registered: 08/04/07
Posts: 87
Loc: Virginia, USA
Quote:
I can remember a boy scout camping trip (I was a tenderfoot at the time) where my patrol leader ate a milk bone on a dare


I used to take the guys in our church youth group camping several times a year, and eating a milk bone was a mild yet hilarious initiation. Surprised how many would gag down just one bite of it.

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#129311 - 04/04/08 03:34 PM Re: Food for on the Trail [Re: Am_Fear_Liath_Mor]
Hacksaw
Unregistered


Originally Posted By: Am_Fear_Liath_Mor
Hi Hacksaw,

Quote:
I'll stick to people food wink


I've found it pretty weird how 'Food for the Trail' has turned into the discussion about the nutritional upsides and downsides of cat and dog food. What would be useful would be some good wholesome homemade recipes that we can all try out the next time we find ourselves in the wilderness. Doggy food and treats won't be finding there way into my pack anytime soon either.



If I were trapped in my house and Spot had already been bbq'd, the left over kibble would be fair game...but I'm not going to start buying specifically to eat on the trail.

It's bad enough I've taken a liking to some of the freeze dried stuff.

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#129314 - 04/04/08 03:55 PM Re: Food for on the Trail [Re: ]
Lono Offline
Old Hand

Registered: 10/19/06
Posts: 1013
Loc: Pacific NW, USA
For solo and small group hiking of like minded folks, I'm a devotee of freezer-bag cooking, see the book and website at http://www.freezerbagcooking.com/. Boil and add water. Lots of tasty recipes, light weight, super simple to prepare, very little if any waste, all that's required at times is the forethought to run your dehydrator for ingredients and bag them into meals. The Freezer Bag Cooking book is first rate, the ongoing discussion on BackPacker forums is very good too. http://www.backpacker.com/cgi-bin/forums/ikonboard.cgi?act=SF;f=512107219.

For first meals on the trail, car camping, and hikes where I'm not so weight conscious, I like to splurge and eat old style, by which I mean old recipes for fry bread, biscuits, and other meals prepped over open fire (where permitted) as opposed to boiling water. One really good source for recipes is something called the Lookout Cookbook, compiled years ago by the Forest Service from the folks manning their fire lookouts. They tended to eat very well, if alone. Lo and behold, there's a free online version of Lookout now - http://www.foresthistory.org/Research/usfscoll/publications/Cookbook/Lookout_Cookbook.html.


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#129317 - 04/04/08 05:18 PM Re: Food for on the Trail [Re: Lono]
Nishnabotna Offline
Icon of Sin
Addict

Registered: 12/31/07
Posts: 512
Loc: Nebraska
The freezer bag cooking is great, but as mentioned previously it's not so light weight when you consider that you have to give up some of your water to rehydrate the bag.

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#129333 - 04/04/08 09:21 PM Re: Food for on the Trail [Re: Nishnabotna]
Lono Offline
Old Hand

Registered: 10/19/06
Posts: 1013
Loc: Pacific NW, USA
I'm biased, I live and hike mostly in the Pacific Northwest, home of abundant, clean flowing water, most of it coming out of the sky all the time. Arizona, maybe a different story.

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#129334 - 04/04/08 09:30 PM Re: Food for on the Trail [Re: Lono]
Hacksaw
Unregistered


Nice site Lono. It's nice to know people are doing this worry free...makes me feel more comfy doing it. I've always avoided boiling in zip top freezer bags because the manufacturers almost always tell you no to...but don't say why. I figured I'd play it safe. Now the sky is the limit

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#129335 - 04/04/08 11:40 PM Re: Food for on the Trail [Re: Lono]
LED Offline
Veteran

Registered: 09/01/05
Posts: 1474
I tried freezerbag cooking, made my own insulator out of reflexite, etc. The main problems for me where the plastic smell and the awkwardness of eating out of a floppy bag. Didn't taste any different so those are just minor annoyances. Still, I swithced to a wide mouthed plastic thermos. Same concept obviously, just pour and let sit. Yeah it weighs more than a freezer bag + cozy but the pluses are that its way easier to eat out of (its got a handle) and it insulates far better than a cozy. Plus its got a handle. Then again when backpacking I've never been an ultralighter so YMMV.

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#129368 - 04/05/08 02:23 PM Re: Food for on the Trail [Re: Paul810]
samhain Offline
Addict

Registered: 11/30/05
Posts: 598
Loc: Baton Rouge, Louisiana
Peanut butter and honey mixed in a squeezeable tube with soft taco sized tortillas.

the pb is a little heavy but it goes a long way.

The only problem I had with it on my last camping trip is when it gets cold you need dynamite to get it out of the tube so I'm going to experiment with wrapping up some hot hands in with it when I store my foodbag overnight.

_________________________
peace,
samhain autumnwood

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#129369 - 04/05/08 02:33 PM Re: Food for on the Trail [Re: Chris Kavanaugh]
samhain Offline
Addict

Registered: 11/30/05
Posts: 598
Loc: Baton Rouge, Louisiana
Originally Posted By: Chris Kavanaugh
I once packed a bottle of Chateau-Laffite '48 and a fresh cooked three course meal including cornbread, stew and cobbler. Of course, I had 3 Dutch Ovens, a coffeepot and a string of mules to help. A friend got into the ultralight hiking cult. He brought a six pack of Bud light. I packed a six pack of glass bottled Warsteiner- and knapped a survival tool kit out of the empties. With the aluminum Bud Light cans he just wasted his chocolate polishing the bases for a signal mirror and fabricated a mini stove.I ate my chocolate, swiss not german and I think on my pannier scales the Bud light wieghed pretty much the same as my german beer once decanted.Unless you indeed dehydrate the stuff, food simply isn't going to be 'light.' This is the same argument as lighter sleeping bags. You need x amount of loft for warmth and x amount of calories. My personal favourite, and very traditonal survival food is Fruitcake. I've even taken to fabricating custom cooking pans out of aluminum to fit the funny pockets on my ( again) german flektharn parka shell.You'd think one at least would be dedicated for my ESBIT stove, but nooooo. So at day's end I've settled for; fruitcake, chocolate, jerky, hard cheese and a lesser wine and finished with coffee or tea. I open it with my ( again) swiss army knife corkscrew all these outdoor Pundits( Pundit being a specially trained british spy trained to calculate long distances via measured and counted steps in India.)decry as useless while promoting guthooks and sawbacks.




Show off.
_________________________
peace,
samhain autumnwood

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#129378 - 04/05/08 05:33 PM Re: Food for on the Trail [Re: Am_Fear_Liath_Mor]
Johno Offline
Enthusiast

Registered: 01/05/03
Posts: 210
Loc: Scotland
Originally Posted By: Am_Fear_Liath_Mor
Hi Johno,

Quote:
Stovies! from instant mash!!!!!!! AAAAAARGH

Good God man how can you desecrate Scotland's Finest spud based meal.

Do agree with the rest of your post though.

I prefer couscous to noodles. But steer away from ration pack meals like the plague.


The Stovies recipe was the 'Survival Version' for the Burt Gummer types who maybe reading and have lots of tins of corned beef and instant mash available in the cellar. The secret ingredient was the Paxo stuffing which makes the whole gooey mess reasonably edible. Perhaps it should have been called 'Barely Stovies' wink laugh

Now depending on the location and time of year in Scotland 'Neeps and Tatties' can be had for free (of course sneeking up to a cow and milking it requires the deepest of survival skills. Best just having your butter to hand from the local supermarket!)

http://www.bbc.co.uk/food/recipes/database/neepsandtatties_9033.shtml

Mmmm, Hot Chocolate Pudding in Chocolate Sauce, now whats wrong with that. Now you might find it strange but I also like the friut biscuits. The Soups and Hot chocolate are as good as anything in the Supermarket. The Corned beef Hash is not to good though even compared to the 'Barely Stovies' recipe. The instant tea just gets binned and replaced with some Scottish Blend or PG tips. But I guess if you have been eating them for weeks on end I can understand your point of view. sick



Three weeks of Lancashire hotpot sort of does that to you. Still the ethnic and veggie packs are very good.
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