Urban edc - City

Posted by: TeacherRO

Urban edc - City - 12/18/17 08:53 PM

The actual stuff I use and carry:
Jacket, cell phone backup battery, $ cash, water bottle, keys.
Posted by: Russ

Re: Urban edc - City - 12/18/17 10:53 PM

Urban EDC - pocket carry:
Folding knife, folding scissors, 1xAA LED, wallet w/ cash, cards & ID, keys.
I always dress for the weather with options for when the weather turns.

At times I carry a backpack with essentials, other times the backpack remains in the truck. Although it probably doesn’t qualify as EDC because I don’t always carry it, the truck and its various kits are always readily available.
Posted by: Tjin

Re: Urban edc - City - 12/18/17 11:09 PM

- Wallet with cards, cash, bandaids
- phone with extra cash in the cover
- Extra cash in my belt
- keychain flashlight; nitecore tip
- Victorinox Huntsmen.

I cary a backpack 95% of the time; with:
- Fold flat dust/carbon mask
- tissues
- powerbank
- phone charger
- CPR mask and gloves
- Sportstape
- Pen
- petroleum jelly
- Patch kit for my bicyle tire
Posted by: Jeanette_Isabelle

Re: Urban edc - City - 12/19/17 12:11 AM

The following is primarily based on my experiences in Dallas:

On my person or in pockets:
Fox 40 whistle and pill fob containing Lorazepam on keychain
Cell phone
Medical ID bracelet

In my bag:
Eyeglass case
Prescription medications
Bottle of aspirin
Kleenex Go Pack
germ-X hand wipe
Carmex
Sunscreen
2C MAG-LITE
Protein bars (number of bars vary)
8 Count box of cracker sandwiches
Two nutritional shakes
8 oz bottle of water
First aid kit with three packets of Alka-Seltzer

Jeanette Isabelle
Posted by: Phaedrus

Re: Urban edc - City - 12/19/17 06:15 AM

My EDC:

Wallet in back right pocket
Cell phone in front left pocket
Car & house keys in front right pocket
Knife (usually a Spyderco Dragonfly in HAP40 or Delica in VG-10) in back left pocket
Flashlight (usually a Malkoff MDC with a TIR head) clipped into right front pocket
Sidearm (HK P2000 carried 3:30 IWB in a Garrett Silent Thunder IWB)
Spare magazine carried at 11:00 in a Safariland 123 Horizontal pouch
Posted by: acropolis5

Re: Urban edc - City - 12/20/17 03:13 AM

I have posted , in these Forums, over many years, on urban EDC & survival, my favorite topic in the survival field. Rather than spending the next hour or so typing, please allow me the conceit of referring you to some of my past posts. Please feel free to critique. I welcome all comments, especially the negative comments.

As to my comprehensive, body carried EDC/GHB pack, please see my 10/21/17 post “New Bag Thinking” and 2/28/14 “ Packing a Get Home Bag -EDC , and my 10/9/12 & 10/21/12 “ Critique my EDC/GHB”, all in Survival Forums. ( No, I don’t carry this ALL the time. But I do carry it often. I strip the tools for places with X-ray security scans.)

For wallet EDC see, “EDC in a Wallet” , 9/10/17, in Survival Forums and “ Urban Specific Survival Advice”, 2/25/16 in Urban Preparedness.

There are other posts , but those are representative.

Finally, I didn’t find a good post on my EDC keychain, so here goes: Necessary entry keys, car key fob, Fenix EO5 with lithium battery, Photon Freedom , yellow with hood and carried backwards in its neck carrier, so it doesn’t turn itself on in my pocket, Bison medium size tube whistle, Bison pill fob with 4 chewable 81mg. Aspirin, 2 generic Benadryl, 4 caffeine tablets, 4 generic pseudoephedrine tablets and 4 generic ibuprofen, with 18” of 2” Gorilla Tape wrapped on pill capsule, Utili- key, and a P-38.

Happy perusing and critiquing and very Happy and Healthy Holidays !
Posted by: chaosmagnet

Re: Urban edc - City - 12/20/17 01:52 PM

If you're not wearing shoes good for significant walking in urban situations, consider adding a pair to your EDC.
Posted by: Dagny

Re: Urban edc - City - 12/23/17 12:30 AM

Originally Posted By: chaosmagnet
If you're not wearing shoes good for significant walking in urban situations, consider adding a pair to your EDC.


Ditto this -- especially women. On 9/11/01, so many of my women friends deeply regretted their high heels as they walked 5 miles or more home from downtown DC. They all kept sneakers in their offices afterward.

On EDC I have the benefit of carrying a purse:

AM/FM/SW Radio (C Crane) + extra batteries
-- if there's a natural or manmade disaster, the first thing you're going to want is
news. Local news. I'd want to reserve my cell phone battery for later when a call
might possibly go through.

Cash -- don't count on credit cards functioning.
Bic lighter
Doug's little MK5 knife
Moleskine + pen
Petzl Zipka head/wrist light
Cotton bandanna


If your workplace is in an urban area then there I'd keep a rucksack or shoulder bag with survival items to get home or shelter-in. And/or a survival bag in your car.

I live in the city and bicycle to work in the city. I keep some convenience foods and canned water in my office -- for everyday use but am mindful of their potential in a shelter-in situation. But I'd be getting home via bike or walking unless there was a radiological or biological hazard in the air.


.
Posted by: dougwalkabout

Re: Urban edc - City - 12/23/17 05:18 AM

Strongly agree that mobility is a massive (and perhaps primary) asset in an urban environment. Most people can can manage 3-4-5 miles in an hour when pressed; and out of the zone of "le horror du jour" a degree or normality, business as usual, will likely exist. Especially if you can pay cash.
Posted by: UncleGoo

Re: Urban edc - City - 12/23/17 03:25 PM

Minimum EDC:
wallet-cash, CCs, drivers license + department ID, dental flosser
bandanna, cellphone, pen
swiss army knife, chapstick, spare change=$1-2.00
firearm + reload + 4" folding knife (part of my uniform for 35 years, now.)
car + minimal necessity keys - two sets, one each front pocket.

Most days-in a bag-I add one or two 32 oz water bottles, flashlight, spare battery pack to recharge cellphone, raincoat, reading material, Powerbars (no affiliation), lollipops, small OC spray, 3*5 cards for paper, a short roll of toilet paper and a small teddy bear.

If you ever have to sit with a lost child while you try to locate their parents, "my old teddy bear," a lollipop, and a game of tic-tac-toe will make their time much easier to bear--no pun intended.
Posted by: chaosmagnet

Re: Urban edc - City - 12/23/17 04:54 PM

The one and only job where I had a downtown office, I worked at place where any obvious signs of prepping would have been career-impairing. My laptop bag and on-body EDC was designed around this for getting out of Dodge. In the office I slowly built up a supply of shelter-in-place items occupying a locked file drawer.
Posted by: Comanche7

Re: Urban edc - City - 12/24/17 02:38 PM

Chaosmagnet,


It is interesting how things change, but still remain the same...

Here is a thread link (should be able to click on it, or paste in browser bar) titled "Why a whistle is important" (Aug. 09-2003) to one of many previous threads regarding kit contents and the like. It's a bit of a read, but interesting. You can also so some forum searches using key words and find a LOT more.

http://forums.equipped.org/ubbthreads.php?ubb=showflat&Main=2500&Number=18520#Post18520

I really like Dagny's thoughts on the radio and actually just ordered one from CountyComm.com about 3 weeks ago. [standard disclaimer for CountyComm, just a customer, they have a lot of neat stuff].

Regards,
Comanche7
Posted by: chaosmagnet

Re: Urban edc - City - 12/24/17 04:43 PM

I remember that thread!

Here's my review on the Countycomm GP-5: http://forums.equipped.org/ubbthreads.php?ubb=showflat&Number=264506. The current model is a little bit improved.
Posted by: Russ

Re: Urban edc - City - 12/24/17 06:01 PM

Yeah, the current model has an SSB mode which is nice when listening to HF/SW broadcast on upper/lower sideband. This is a great radio imo. It runs on three AA batteries and if you read the instructions, you will use rechargeable NiMH batteries because the radio can recharge them when connected to a USB 5V power source. One seemingly innocuous accessory is the GP-5 Desk Pod which is a simple aluminum block which allows the radio to stand vertical. Standing upright is a good thing when you use the AM Ferrite Swivel antenna. The pod keeps the radio stable so the antenna can swivel. DSP and a really good AM ferrite antenna makes it an outstanding AM radio. The previous version of the GP-5 SSB is still marketed by the manufacturer as the Tecsun PL-360 but does not have SSB. I have the previous version of CC’s GP-5 on my desk here and I use it for AM because it’s probably the best AM radio I own.

What else -- Tecsun’s Easy Tuning Mode (ETM) allows you to scan the local spectrum and it logs the active stations to temporary memory and then when you tune from station to station, you skip all the noise between stations. Nice feature, but it won’t find weak signals, you’ll need to work for those. No piece of tech is a panacea for doing your homework. Know the KHz and MHz of the stations you want.

The GP-5-SSB is a nice radio, but when I think of a survival radio the first comms I think of are local AM/FM broadcast and a different CC radio fills that requirement nicely -- Pocket NOAA/AM/FM Radio. Since the subject is EDC, the CC pocket radio is just that, sized for pocket carry; drop it in your pocket/purse and it’s always there. Much smaller and lighter than a GP-5. I have the same radio with the Kaito brand name -- Kaito KA210 Pocket AM/FM NOAA Weather Radio

Posted by: Comanche7

Re: Urban edc - City - 12/25/17 03:11 AM

Russ,

Good info on the AM/FM NOAA radios, I looked and there is a $12 difference between the CC and the Kaito unit, favoring Kaito.
Posted by: Russ

Re: Urban edc - City - 12/25/17 04:06 AM

Yeah but... The Kaito 210 is for the radio only, the CC Pocket radio is part of a kit including the (very good imo) case and the Clarus Flashlight/Lantern. Price isn’t a good comparison unless you have no use for the lantern and case. FWIW.
Posted by: Comanche7

Re: Urban edc - City - 12/25/17 04:25 AM

Russ,

Yes, you speak verily. Good points.
Posted by: TeacherRO

Re: Urban edc - City - 04/26/18 10:39 PM

Adding sunglasses and a sunhat to my urban kit
Posted by: JIM

Re: Urban edc - City - 05/13/18 02:20 PM

Some things that I specifically like to carry in a city/urban enviroment in addition to my normal edc

- emergency cash
- powerbank
- prescription medication
- medical/trauma kit
- glass breaking capability (res-q-me)
- extra flashlight or spare battery for primairy edc light
- snacks & water
- plastic shopping bag(s)
- diaper and wipes (for the kid, not for me) wink
Posted by: katarin

Re: Urban edc - City - 05/17/18 09:09 AM

I have a question for you urban EDCers. How do you keep the weight down?
Posted by: Jeanette_Isabelle

Re: Urban edc - City - 05/17/18 10:56 AM

Originally Posted By: katarin
I have a question for you urban EDCers. How do you keep the weight down?

I replaced my D-Cell MAG-LITE with a C-Cell MAG-LITE.

Jeanette Isabelle
Posted by: hikermor

Re: Urban edc - City - 05/17/18 12:52 PM

Originally Posted By: katarin
I have a question for you urban EDCers. How do you keep the weight down?

Many of us backpack and hike, so we are already weight conscious. In general, you value versatility as well as absolute weight - multi-use items win the day, particularly if you are considering items carried on your person.

Many EDC items hang out in a vehicle, and weight is not an issue.
Posted by: Russ

Re: Urban edc - City - 05/17/18 02:18 PM

I replaced my D-cell Maglites first with a 2xAA LED flashlights and now a 1xAA or 1xAAA depending on expected need. The 1xAAA LED lights these days have a lot of output. For times when I need a lot of lumens to reach out, I have a couple LED lights which use 18650 Li-ion batteries, still way smaller and lighter than even a C-cell maglite.

My old Maglites have been retrofitted with LED emitters and rechargeable batteries. With LED emitters, D-cell alkaline batteries will time out and leak before they run down from use. Maglites will always be reliable blunt instruments and now the bulbs won’t fail due to impact damage.
Posted by: Jeanette_Isabelle

Re: Urban edc - City - 05/17/18 07:09 PM

I like the feel of a full-size MAG-LITE in my hand. Mom always made an issue of the weight and volume of the D-Cell MAG-LITE I always carry. I switched to C-Cell. It's lighter and smaller; it has the feel of a full-size flashlight. Also, I can still turn it off and on with my thumb on the button rather than twisting the head.

Jeanette Isabelle
Posted by: Tjin

Re: Urban edc - City - 05/17/18 07:14 PM

Originally Posted By: katarin
I have a question for you urban EDCers. How do you keep the weight down?


Not carry that much and choose small things.

Light is just a Nitecore tube, Knife is a mid size Swiss army knife, wallet is based on a card holder, keys are aranged in a order where it keep the small and neat, with a carabiner where i add keys i need that day.
Posted by: TeacherRO

Re: Urban edc - City - 05/18/18 08:30 PM

Originally Posted By: hikermor
Originally Posted By: katarin
I have a question for you urban EDCers. How do you keep the weight down?

Many of us backpack and hike, so we are already weight conscious. In general, you value versatility as well as absolute weight - multi-use items win the day, particularly if you are considering items carried on your person.

Many EDC items hang out in a vehicle, and weight is not an issue.


Agree. You don't EDC everything for every possibility - Just some multi-use stuff.
Try and keep your bag under 3 kilos.

And you plan realistically - for your needs, experience and your area. Alaska requires different gear than San Diego...

Much of what you might need goes in the desk at work or in the truck... and you don't schlep it everyday.

And, let's be realistic here; four sharps is three too many.
Posted by: Russ

Re: Urban edc - City - 05/18/18 08:41 PM

...four sharps is a start... wink
Posted by: pforeman

Re: Urban edc - City - 05/19/18 09:18 PM

I'm in agreement that your EDC has to fit your environment and situation.

Every day I've got my little Fenix EO5 on my key chain with a custom cuff key and 'p-38' on it and alongside is my SureFire P6 for flashlights. I also have my Gerber Applegate Combat Folding Knife and a 'generic' little three blade Stockman Pocket Knife. wallet and a small daytimer with some extra cash, cards documents info and ID. I also have Issued work ID, cell phone some pocket change and my money clip with spending cash - a 'space' bullet pen eyeglass wipe rag and a mini FAK (gloves, mask, batteries for SureFire) there is also a couple of hankies a couple of extra poo bags in case the fur ball is with but they can be re-purposed easily - a couple of other steel case ball point pens too. I carry when at the office an extra FAK with tourniquet, bandages, duct tape, more gloves etc. A side arm comes into play when it makes sense but I am often in un-permissive places so the firearm comes and goes and I can't consider it EDC.

There is also a whole additional level when I get to my car as well... 'go bag' with a bunch of gear and additional supplies too. Don't even get me started about the extra pounds that live in my coat when I have that on and it's usually at least in the car even in the summer (winter just gets a heaver version).

So, the point to this is to figure out if you need a C D AA or AAA size light and how it is to do more then just light stuff up. My little SureFire has a 'strike bezel' and I can do a whole lot with that and I am glad to replace my Mag-Light (went from D to C to SureFire) with the little P6. A lot of people won't or don't like my knife choices - hey, so be it... works for me.

We won't even start talking about going full blown with duty belt, rifle and all that crap - that ain't daily carry!

Paul -
Posted by: pforeman

Re: Urban edc - City - 05/19/18 09:27 PM

Sorry - I just realized I did't really respond to the weight question... I am sure it's in there somewhere in my prior rambling post but... to be sure: I replaced the flashlights in my EDC with the "best" (for me) smallest choices I could find. Going from (original Kel-Light) Mag-Light to the SureFire back in '89 was a good step. I got better performance (more light) in a much smaller and lighter package and learned how to 'weaponize' it if necessary (I've still got my original but have the latest version in my pocket).

Get a good, small, high-intensity light to use in place of the Mag-Light would be a good experiment to try. Maybe even go "cheep" with some bad knock off for a few bucks to see if it would make sense and if it does - get a really good min-light to count on.

Paul -
Posted by: Jeanette_Isabelle

Re: Urban edc - City - 05/19/18 10:58 PM

Originally Posted By: pforeman
Get a good, small, high-intensity light to use in place of the Mag-Light would be a good experiment to try. Maybe even go "cheep" with some bad knock off for a few bucks to see if it would make sense and if it does - get a really good min-light to count on.

I explained why I went with a C-Cell instead of something smaller.

Originally Posted By: Jeanette_Isabelle
I like the feel of a full-size MAG-LITE in my hand. Mom always made an issue of the weight and volume of the D-Cell MAG-LITE I always carry. I switched to C-Cell. It's lighter and smaller; it has the feel of a full-size flashlight. Also, I can still turn it off and on with my thumb on the button rather than twisting the head.

Jeanette Isabelle
Posted by: hikermor

Re: Urban edc - City - 05/20/18 03:32 AM

I am totally happy with current lights that take NiMh or li-on rechargeables - high lumen output, variable brightness, long run times, well designed, and quite reliable. I come from the bad old days of poor quality lights, leaking batteries that didn't put out that much light anyway, and failing incandescent lamps. In those days, carbide lamps were your best source for walking in the dark. Maglites were the first harbinger of change, but they have been surpassed by many current offerings which are generally even brighter and lighter. Yea Zebralight! Yea Nitecore (and many others)!
Posted by: Russ

Re: Urban edc - City - 05/20/18 04:30 AM

ThruNite TN12 is very versatile and an all-around good light. There are many others. Five output levels — Firefly mode is 0.4 lumen, Max is 1050 (depending on emitter). I really like mine.
Posted by: hikermor

Re: Urban edc - City - 05/20/18 06:37 PM

Your light is a really good example of an 18650 light available today (I have the Nitecore version). it is worth noting that it is important to equip these lights with high capacity batteries(at least 3000 mah) in order to get longer run times and capacity....
Posted by: Russ

Re: Urban edc - City - 05/20/18 06:45 PM

Yep, the link posted includes a 3400 mAh battery and a pocket USB charger. I have the charger and it makes for a nice pocket size power pack. You can take it along for an extra battery for the light or for add’l energy for your cell-phone.
Posted by: katarin

Re: Urban edc - City - 05/23/18 01:32 AM

Originally Posted By: hikermor
Originally Posted By: katarin
I have a question for you urban EDCers. How do you keep the weight down?

Many of us backpack and hike, so we are already weight conscious. In general, you value versatility as well as absolute weight - multi-use items win the day, particularly if you are considering items carried on your person.

Many EDC items hang out in a vehicle, and weight is not an issue.


I don't have a vehicle and either walk or use public transit.
Posted by: hikermor

Re: Urban edc - City - 05/23/18 12:58 PM

For basics, I would recommend a Leatherman ps4, a small MT which I use regularly (the most of the many that I own). Pair that with a small AAA flashlight and carry those with your keys. A Bic lighter is handy to have.

You can add additional items to suit your circumstances to a belt pouch or small back pack.
Posted by: Montanero

Re: Urban edc - City - 05/23/18 02:13 PM

I know that I have mentioned this before in other threads, but think of your gear in layers. Layer 1 is what you need to survive (basic physical survival, appropriate to your situation) and is carried on your person. Your real Every Day Carry. A cell phone is included in this in my opinion, as it can help to prevent, avoid or resolve most situations. Tools that are commonly carried by some of us may be illegal in other areas, so check to make sure. A Swiss Army Knife without a locking blade (which generally have shorter blades than the locking ones) will have multiple tools and are usually legal, even in New York City. The small multi-tools are usually legal.

Layer 2 is what you need to get home or to a safe area, which may take a little more time and effort. A small backpack, fanny pack or other bag with maps, water (because it is difficult to carry in your pocket), shelter (keep you dry and stop the wind, maybe insulating as well), power for your communications, non-technical signaling (something bright and visible that is recognizable as an emergency signal), some snacks (your brain works better with some water and energy, improving your decision making), maybe a more substantial tool or tools that are not suitable to carry in your pocket, same with light (maybe a small lantern, a more powerful signaling light).

Layer 3 is in your vehicle, on your bike or in your office or other safe area on your route. I would prep your place of work, know what resources or safe areas may be available along your route, and prep your house. This is more long term, shelter in place for more than a few hours. Water, shelter, food, first aid, water purification, decently comfortable sleeping gear. Consumable supplies for about 3 days.

Every individual's situation will be a little different. Hurricanes, earthquakes, floods, tornadoes; they happen. There are many other, less common, potential emergency situations that you can prepare for, but generally if you can survive for 3 to 5 days you should be able to handle most situations until you can either receive help or get to help.

Think about what is most likely to happen, and what is most dangerous or catastrophic. What will you need to do? Where will you need to go? What will help you accomplish your immediate goals? If you are on the subway, will you need to evacuate or stay in place until rescue? Is it even possible to get out? Are you very familiar with the areas you travel through on the bus? Do you know alternate routes, what are the potential threats and safe areas along those routes?

Your brain is your most important and effective survival tool. The time you spend thinking through potential scenarios and gathering information is priceless.
Posted by: hikermor

Re: Urban edc - City - 05/23/18 02:33 PM

Montanero, outstanding post!!

I might add - think what you could place in your wallet(besides still more cash) - my fav are a few band aids for routine owies, but there is a lot more one could put there, depending on circumstances...
Posted by: Montanero

Re: Urban edc - City - 05/23/18 03:57 PM

Thanks Hikermor.

To add to what I posted before, at the risk of droning on:

The water bottles I like for pocket carry or in small bags are the flask shaped ones. There are various sizes available, and I prefer the largest opening I can find to ease refilling. There is a bottled water company that I like (normal disclaimer) called FRED. They make flask shaped bottles specifically to make them easier to carry. If it is not convenient to carry, you will not carry it, and you will not have it when you need it. The FRED bottles can be carried in a pocket if necessary. I carry them often in a jacket pocket, and they fit well in a little Kelty sling pack I have.

As has been discussed before in other threads, physical fitness can be very important. The healthier you are the more survivable you are, and the better you can handle stress and overcome obstacles (such as walking a long distance to get home). In the military (at least in my own experience) fitness is treated as a weapon system. You are better able to handle everything life can throw at you, and overcome your enemies. Any physical training is better than no physical training, do what you can.

All of the best equipment does you no good if you do not know how to use it, or if you don't carry it. Practice with it. This forum is full of good people willing to help you out, and with a great deal of knowledge and experience, use it. If you are unwilling to post publicly, contact someone privately. I think most everyone here will be more than happy to assist.
Posted by: TeacherRO

Re: Urban edc - City - 05/23/18 07:06 PM

Originally Posted By: hikermor
Montanero, outstanding post!!

I might add - think what you could place in your wallet(besides still more cash) - my fav are a few band aids for routine owies, but there is a lot more one could put there, depending on circumstances...


Yes; small tools, contact numbers and addresses, sim card, key...
Posted by: TeacherRO

Re: Urban edc - City - 05/23/18 07:07 PM

Originally Posted By: Montanero
Thanks Hikermor.

To add to what I posted before, at the risk of droning on:

The water bottles I like for pocket carry or in small bags are the flask shaped ones. There are various sizes available, and I prefer the largest opening I can find to ease refilling. There is a bottled water company that I like (normal disclaimer) called FRED. They make flask shaped bottles specifically to make them easier to carry. If it is not convenient to carry, you will not carry it, and you will not have it when you need it. The FRED bottles can be carried in a pocket if necessary. I carry them often in a jacket pocket, and they fit well in a little Kelty sling pack I have.


A mouthwash bottle works well for this.
Posted by: Russ

Re: Urban edc - City - 05/23/18 10:00 PM

Layering of gear is a good approach. In my case the first layer could be referred to as “daily user” gear. (From page 1 of this thread)
Originally Posted By: Russ
Urban EDC - pocket carry:
Folding knife, folding scissors, 1xAA LED, wallet w/ cash, cards & ID, keys.
I always dress for the weather with options for when the weather turns. ...

A cellphone is also part of the mix. OT: Recently I was waffling regarding upgrading my smartphone and changing my plan. I ended up with the same smartphone plus a ruggedized flip-phone on a new line for not much more than my previous plan (plus the phone which I bought outright). Now I have a phone that I can EDC; the large, expensive and very dropable smartphone was prone to being left behind. The rubber-armored and waterproof flip-phone OTOH is easier to carry and more resilient to being dropped. Regardless, a cellphone is back in my EDC.
Posted by: dougwalkabout

Re: Urban edc - City - 05/23/18 10:54 PM

Originally Posted By: katarin
Originally Posted By: hikermor
Originally Posted By: katarin
I have a question for you urban EDCers. How do you keep the weight down?

Many of us backpack and hike, so we are already weight conscious. In general, you value versatility as well as absolute weight - multi-use items win the day, particularly if you are considering items carried on your person.

Many EDC items hang out in a vehicle, and weight is not an issue.


I don't have a vehicle and either walk or use public transit.


I find that a smallish laptop bag is reasonably comfortable to schlep around. I get them from thrift shops for a few dollars. I may even toss in a beater laptop/tablet on occasion. Or (gasp) a book.

In the places I go, they blend in as a ubiquitous carry item.

In really rough places, I guess they might attract unwanted attention. If I leave it in my car (which I use as a high MPG truck), I cover it with an old jacket or some of the other inevitable flotsam so some twit doesn't break a $150 window hoping to score a macbook.
Posted by: dougwalkabout

Re: Urban edc - City - 05/23/18 11:04 PM

Originally Posted By: TeacherRO
A mouthwash bottle works well for this.


Good idea. I have used plastic booze bottles on impromptu walks, but these send all the wrong messages. No sense attracting attention (or revulsion for that matter). Though mouthwash bottles may have the same stigma(?).

Either way, best to include a paper bag. laugh
Posted by: Montanero

Re: Urban edc - City - 05/24/18 12:32 AM

Yes, Doug, part of my EDC is usually a book also. I have been told that I can't be comfortable in a room that does not have a book in it. I go through a lot of books every year, so I am always carrying one or two. Hard copy mostly, though I do use a Kindle at times and listen to audio books as well. I can't survive without books.
Posted by: Teslinhiker

Re: Urban edc - City - 05/24/18 03:01 AM

Originally Posted By: Montanero
Yes, Doug, part of my EDC is usually a book also. I have been told that I can't be comfortable in a room that does not have a book in it. I go through a lot of books every year, so I am always carrying one or two. Hard copy mostly, though I do use a Kindle at times and listen to audio books as well. I can't survive without books.


I agree, a book is always on me - typically in an electronic version on my Kindle or on the Kindle app on my phone. Nice to be able to carry a few hundred books or more without the weight burden of traditional books.
Posted by: katarin

Re: Urban edc - City - 05/24/18 09:09 AM

Originally Posted By: hikermor
For basics, I would recommend a Leatherman ps4, a small MT which I use regularly (the most of the many that I

Where I live not allowed to have those type of knives or tools. Even my Leatherman Micra would be considered a "weapon"



own). Pair that with a small AAA flashlight and carry those with your keys. A Bic lighter is handy to have.

The flashlight I already have.

You can add additional items to suit your circumstances to a belt pouch or small back pack.
Posted by: TeacherRO

Re: Urban edc - City - 06/05/18 12:25 AM

Because my urban route gets rural and wild pretty fast, I might include a tiny bug spray...
Posted by: TeacherRO

Re: Urban edc - City - 10/30/18 07:04 PM

...sunscreen and sunglasses.
Posted by: TeacherRO

Re: Urban edc - City - 11/30/18 10:32 PM

Adding a scarf ( its cold here!)
Posted by: pforeman

Re: Urban edc - City - 12/01/18 02:46 PM

I will 'second' the layer idea. Now that cold weather is upon (most) of us I have a "layer two" in my every day coat. There is also the bag in the car just across the street when yet more goodies are available.

As others have said, keeping additional supplies and/or alternative equipment around in the extra office drawer, car, computer bag or where ever, is that third layer and just a good idea.

I recently got some cheap older hand held UHF/VHF dual band ham radios which also receive commercial FM broadcast and all the NOAA channels and have put one of them with some extra battery packs etc. in my office kennel too. It's older so also covers GMRS and the FRS bands so I've got alternative communications to just the cell phone. Keeping some simple tools and a multi-tool and some 'junk' food, water bottles (also a water carrier) and longer term 'real' food in the spare file drawer is something I also have set up. We've always got first-aid supplies at the office so I can also quickly augment my personal EDC FAK if something comes up. Don't forget to keep a roll or two of quarters around in case you can still raid vending machines - and in a pinch they are great in a sock as an improvised sap.

Paul -
Posted by: TeacherRO

Re: Urban edc - City - 12/13/18 09:16 PM

And I plan to fill my water bottle at the start of any long hikes home - and not carry it full "just in case."

YMMV
Posted by: TeacherRO

Re: Urban edc - City - 01/05/19 10:50 PM

Also, any edc in excess of 5kg isn't for me.
Posted by: Russ

Re: Urban edc - City - 01/05/19 11:07 PM

11 lbs (5kg) is way past my urban EDC limit. My urban EDC is limited to pocket carry and I’m still experimenting with neck carry for smaller items. CountyComm has Ti ball chain which might work. I may cover the chain with paracord sheathing — experimenting...
Posted by: TeacherRO

Re: Urban edc - City - 01/07/19 06:55 PM

My work carry is almost always a bag; more room for things like a jacket/umbrella, water bottle, spare battery, snack bar, etc.