Bug Out Bag Contents

Posted by: Jeanette_Isabelle

Bug Out Bag Contents - 08/16/19 02:27 PM

While we discuss which backpack to get, let me share with you my idea for the contents. First, I want to use the following as a starter.

https://www.gatapack.com/collections/frontpage/products/quick-pack-contents

A Glacier Stainless Bottle Cup, 20 oz.

https://gsioutdoors.com/glacier-stainless-bottle-cup-pot.html

An indoor/outdoor stove.

https://www.sternopro.com/inferno-stove-kit.html

And an MRE.

Jeanette Isabelle
Posted by: Jeanette_Isabelle

Re: Bug Out Bag Contents - 08/16/19 03:24 PM

Something I forgot to mention is to include a PSP which has a fire starter, tender, a signal mirror, button compass and a better whistle among other things.

Jeanette Isabelle
Posted by: chaosmagnet

Re: Bug Out Bag Contents - 08/16/19 03:29 PM

Jeanette,

I just built a lightweight emergency kit for my recombinant DNA. This particular offspring is competent for a young adult and is bringing a vehicle to college.

Here's what I viewed as essential for this kit:

Car Specific
  • Car paperwork (in glovebox)
  • Jumper cables (under trunk deck)
  • Assortment of automotive fuses (under trunk deck)
  • self-fusing silicone tape (under trunk deck)
  • duct tape (under trunk deck)


Emergency Bag
  • Water bottle and Chlorine Dioxide tablets
  • Ritter PSP
  • Emergency ponchos x2
  • A few gallon ziplocs
  • A few contractor bags
  • A small tarp
  • 3-wick candle
  • Heatsheets two-person blanket x2
  • fullsize Bic in a kydex sheath
  • USB power bank, spare cable, spare 12V USB adapter
  • First Aid Kit and Trauma Kit
  • Writing materials
  • N95 masks x2
  • Baby wipes
  • Flashlight and headlamp (being for a non-flashaholic, these are appropriately easy to use) with a few extra batteries
  • Multitool
  • Small pry bar
  • Mora fixed blade knife
  • Small amount of super glue
  • Paracord
  • Duct tape


I left out food and cooking on purpose to minimize bulk and be focused on shelter, fire, communications, first aid, and tools.

Your area of operations, skillset, and needs are different, but I thought this give you some ideas.
Posted by: Jeanette_Isabelle

Re: Bug Out Bag Contents - 08/16/19 05:01 PM

Originally Posted By: chaosmagnet
Emergency Bag
  • Water bottle and Chlorine Dioxide tablets
  • Ritter PSP
  • Emergency ponchos x2
  • A few gallon ziplocs
  • A few contractor bags
  • A small tarp
  • 3-wick candle
  • Heatsheets two-person blanket x2
  • fullsize Bic in a kydex sheath
  • USB power bank, spare cable, spare 12V USB adapter
  • First Aid Kit and Trauma Kit
  • Writing materials
  • N95 masks x2
  • Baby wipes
  • Flashlight and headlamp (being for a non-flashaholic, these are appropriately easy to use) with a few extra batteries
  • Multitool
  • Small pry bar
  • Mora fixed blade knife
  • Small amount of super glue
  • Paracord
  • Duct tape

I have most of these in my proposed kit or something that will accomplish the same task.

I forgot to include the PSP in my original post.

What I didn't propose are the Ziplocks, contractor bags, tarp, candle, (I did not mention a Bic; that is something I did consider) and power bank (I did consider one as part of a radio). I will bring my medical kit with me in addition to what is in the proposed kit, I do need a mask, I might include wipes in addition to what is in the first aid kit, I don't think I will include a pry bar, I'm not sure what to use for a knife and I don't think I will include super glue.

Jeanette Isabelle
Posted by: teacher

Re: Bug Out Bag Contents - 08/16/19 09:06 PM

Originally Posted By: Jeanette_Isabelle


An indoor/outdoor stove.

Jeanette Isabelle


In most cases, DO NOT use portable stoves inside structures - Tents, trucks, houses, boats, etc.
Posted by: teacher

Re: Bug Out Bag Contents - 08/16/19 09:08 PM

My kit(s) add work gloves & food.
Posted by: Jeanette_Isabelle

Re: Bug Out Bag Contents - 08/16/19 09:46 PM

Originally Posted By: teacher
In most cases, DO NOT use portable stoves inside structures - Tents, trucks, houses, boats, etc.

If you click the link you will see that the stove uses Sterno cans, same thing caterers use.

Jeanette Isabelle
Posted by: Jeanette_Isabelle

Re: Bug Out Bag Contents - 08/16/19 09:47 PM

Originally Posted By: teacher
My kit(s) add work gloves & food.

My proposed kit has both.

Jeanette Isabelle
Posted by: hikermor

Re: Bug Out Bag Contents - 08/16/19 10:05 PM

If you buy the stove you indicate, it already includes a pot/cup and the one you list would be unnecessary...

There are stoves available that are much hotter. lighter, and more efficient than that stove, however, since I take it that you need a sterno fuel can.
Posted by: Jeanette_Isabelle

Re: Bug Out Bag Contents - 08/16/19 10:59 PM

Originally Posted By: hikermor
If you buy the stove you indicate, it already includes a pot/cup and the one you list would be unnecessary...

Certainly a valid statement. Since the cup takes up no additional space (comfortable fits over the water bottle) and we have to consider a possibility of the stove being used by more than one person, why not include it?

Originally Posted By: hikermor
There are stoves available that are much hotter. lighter, and more efficient than that stove, however, since I take it that you need a sterno fuel can.

I like the fact that this stove can be used indoors. Also, Mom has expressed her concern with storing gas canisters.

Jeanette Isabelle
Posted by: hikermor

Re: Bug Out Bag Contents - 08/17/19 02:27 AM

Originally Posted By: Jeanette_Isabelle
Originally Posted By: hikermor
If you buy the stove you indicate, it already includes a pot/cup and the one you list would be unnecessary...

Certainly a valid statement. Since the cup takes up no additional space (comfortable fits over the water bottle) and we have to consider a possibility of the stove being used by more than one person, why not include it?

Originally Posted By: hikermor
There are stoves available that are much hotter. lighter, and more efficient than that stove, however, since I take it that you need a sterno fuel can.

I like the fact that this stove can be used indoors. Also, Mom has expressed her concern with storing gas canisters.

Jeanette Isabelle


Any flame, including sterno cans, is a potential source of carbon monoxide. If the users are attentive, and the space is decently ventilated, there is little problem. I have often used camping stoves of various brands inside cabins etc. with no problems. one does need to alert to the potential dangers of carbon monoxide.

In a bugout situation, I would save weight and share a cup. This is not High Tea with royalty.

Speaking of weight, if there is concern with isobutane fuel canisters, consider an alcohol stove. Buy one - Trangia is a common, dependable brand, or make one from an aluminum can. They will burn alcohol, including high proof booze or even the alcohol based hand cleaner in your FAK(like Purell). Alcohol is much hotter per unit weight than sterno,which takes a long time to cook anything.

For the last twenty years, I have used an MSR Pocket Rocket (weight 3 oz) with isobutane canisters and been quite satisfied. I have had no problems with the canisters nor have I heard of any. Any fuel, even wood, must be handled properly, with due regard for safety. Otherwise, learn to live on raisins, peanuts, and cold instant coffee (Horrors...)
Posted by: Phaedrus

Re: Bug Out Bag Contents - 08/17/19 03:30 AM

I really want to get an MSR Windburner! Amazon had them for $102 for a while, really kicking myself I didn't jump on it. Now they're back to $150 again.

Personally I really like the nesting cups. I know; ounces make pounds and it adds up. But with an extra cup (especially a 25oz nesting cup with a lid- I'm specifically thinking of the DZO mug) you can cook, boil or move more water or even make charred material! To me a nesting cup on each bottle is worth the extra pound or so of weight.
Posted by: Russ

Re: Bug Out Bag Contents - 08/17/19 01:27 PM

The MSR PocketRocket is a great stove imo. Enough BTUís to cook and it can be turned down to simmer. Great control for a small stove. You can pick on up at the Winter Park, FL REI today while youíre shopping for a decent backpack. wink.
Posted by: Jeanette_Isabelle

Re: Bug Out Bag Contents - 08/17/19 01:48 PM

I may get the backpack from Woot. As for the stove, I need something to heat water for my coffee, can be used indoors and does not use gas canisters.

Jeanette Isabelle
Posted by: hikermor

Re: Bug Out Bag Contents - 08/17/19 01:58 PM

Get an alcohol stove -Trangia or equivalent is a good bet.

Another option would be Esbit tablets, often offered with a stand that supports a pan, although such can be easily improvised.
Posted by: Russ

Re: Bug Out Bag Contents - 08/17/19 02:44 PM

I have used a butane stove in the kitchen here during neighborhood/area blackouts with no ill effects. I normally have a window partially open, so my CO detector has not been concerned.

I have a stainless steel Gas ONE model that boils water faster than the electric stove top, good single burner stove ó no issues. At least a couple Iwatani models seem to be professional grade. These butane stoves have similar designs; imo itís about build quality and burner output.

I prefer the full size version of these stoves. The miniís have an issue with hot pans extending over the fuel canister compartment which is not a good thing.
Posted by: Jeanette_Isabelle

Re: Bug Out Bag Contents - 08/17/19 05:27 PM

Those can be used indoors; again, Mom does not want to store gas canisters.

Jeanette Isabelle
Posted by: Russ

Re: Bug Out Bag Contents - 08/17/19 07:15 PM

Yeah, issues with fuel storage notwithstanding, butane stoves are still a good option for power outages.
Posted by: Russ

Re: Bug Out Bag Contents - 08/18/19 01:49 PM

If you have all your survival items (sans backpack) in a large box or storage container from HomeDepot, you have a lot of gear and life is great.

How much can you carry? One trip or multiple trips? Can you walk miles without a pack? How about with a pack and all the gear it carries? Iíve seen a few folks with lots of gear who canít walk to the local shopping center. On one of my walks here I pass by two shopping centers and neighbors are like, ďYou walked there??Ē (Then again, one of the neighbors could run that route and cut my time in half, but heís half my age...) Point of this being, get your mode of transport ready. If you have a BOB, be prepared to carry it the distance.

The BOB is for that one trip. You need to pare the gear in your large container down so that your final reduced gear list will fit in a backpack that you can actually carry ó volume and weight. Are all the bases covered? Oh, yeah, that great FAK that would outfit a hospital ER wonít be included and those Mag-lites? Fuggetaboutit...

This is why my BOB is a truck. I have a GHB in the truck, but itís for a one way trip home and Iíll leave a lot of gear in the truck. If you have a prepared bug-out location and you can store stuff there, your BOB can be a lot smaller than you think.

My bug-out location is a two day drive so if I donít leave early, I donít leave at all ó bugging in.
Posted by: hikermor

Re: Bug Out Bag Contents - 08/18/19 04:35 PM

Right on! The size and contents of your BOB will be dictated by your circumstances, especially distance to your destination. One does have a destination, right? Otherwise you are a refugee, homeless and destitute....

Ideally, i would start out in a well equipped vehicle, but if circumstances denied use of that vehicle, we pare down to backpacks and start walking.
Posted by: Jeanette_Isabelle

Re: Bug Out Bag Contents - 08/20/19 06:33 PM

Last night Mom researched the price of every item in the Quick Pack Contents and added everything up. It came to $150. GATA has it for $130.

After a hard sell, Mom approved my idea for the prototype to learn with. As an unexpected bonus, Mom is using that list to improve the car kit she built.

Jeanette Isabelle