Bannock Recipes

Posted by: bacpacjac

Bannock Recipes - 01/05/13 05:00 PM

This morning, my son and I experimented with a new bannock recipe. We baked it in the oven n pachment paper on a pizza tray. Turned out great!

1 cup whole wheat flour
1 tbsp-ish of baked powder
1 tbsp-ish of salt
2 tbsp of brown sugar

Baked in the oven at 375 for about 15 minutes, flipped mid-way.

REALLY good with some butter and homemade jam.

Given that I'm going to be cooped up for a while, I'm looking for new recipes to test. Please share your favourites with me!

Posted by: hikermor

Re: Bannock Recipes - 01/05/13 08:36 PM

Does your recipe include any liquid? Isn't bannock, in its classic configuration, would around a stick and baked over open coals?

It looks tempting - I have always just done pancakes, but bannock looks interesting.....
Posted by: LesSnyder

Re: Bannock Recipes - 01/05/13 09:35 PM

for a southern style dessert... not Bannock

Key Lime Pie

a friend and I tweaked the recipe from the label on Nellie and Joes Famous Key Lime juice bottle ( be careful as they also bottle lemon juice in the same colored bottle).. the original was for 3 egg yolks, and we added another

preheat oven to 350F
mix well:
4 egg yolks (no whites)
14oz can of Eagle Brand sweetened condensed milk
1/2 cup of key lime juice
add to 9" Graham cracker shell (I like the "extra slice" size as it makes a slightly thinner portion)

bake for 20 to 25 minutes (original recipe calls for 15), but I like the custard to pull slightly away from the crust

cool... refrigerate... top with 1/2 tub of Cool Whip

Posted by: K9medic

Re: Bannock Recipes - 01/05/13 10:12 PM

Ĺ cup of plain flour
Ĺ cup of rolled oats
1x teaspoon of baking powder
Salt (sort of just throw some in)
Dried herbs (I like rosemary or sage)

Mix this in a plastic bag and take it with me when Iím camping. I then just mix in some water, drop it in a mess tin and stick it over the embers of a fire, nice with an ox cube watching the stars
Posted by: bacpacjac

Re: Bannock Recipes - 01/05/13 10:43 PM

Originally Posted By: hikermor
Does your recipe include any liquid? Isn't bannock, in its classic configuration, would around a stick and baked over open coals?

It looks tempting - I have always just done pancakes, but bannock looks interesting.....


Oops! Yes, there is water in it. I'm not sure exactly how much. I mixed it until it came together. Pretty thick and not super well mixed or kneaded. Sorry. I should have measured!

Yes, traditionally it's cooked either around a stick or fried in oil, over a campfire. It's one of those recipes, though, that is very versatile. There are 8,000 recipes and probably a hundred ways to cook it.
Posted by: bacpacjac

Re: Bannock Recipes - 01/05/13 10:44 PM

mmmmMMMMMMM!!!! Tempt the pregnant woman, why don't you, Les?!
Posted by: bacpacjac

Re: Bannock Recipes - 01/05/13 10:45 PM

Originally Posted By: K9medic
Ĺ cup of plain flour
Ĺ cup of rolled oats
1x teaspoon of baking powder
Salt (sort of just throw some in)
Dried herbs (I like rosemary or sage)

Mix this in a plastic bag and take it with me when Iím camping. I then just mix in some water, drop it in a mess tin and stick it over the embers of a fire, nice with an ox cube watching the stars



I really like bannock with oats! Dried fruit is another favourite, as is bacon, cheese, pepperoni..... mmmMMM!!
Posted by: hikermor

Re: Bannock Recipes - 01/06/13 02:19 PM

Ahh...they joys of ETS. I just finished my first attempt at bannock. I couldn't resist the oatmeal variant, but I made it plain, with no spices, genrously larding it with applesauce.

Pretty darn good stuff and it is obviously easy to bake in an outdoor situation (I don't usually backpack my toaster oven). Now to get busy with some of the suggested additives......
Posted by: spuds

Re: Bannock Recipes - 01/06/13 05:17 PM

Sure is an interesting idea,thanks so much for sharing it!
Posted by: JPickett

Re: Bannock Recipes - 01/06/13 10:59 PM

IZZY! I'm Interested! I lived in Georgia for 17 years and often made it down to Destin/Fort Walton Florida. My Mother-In-Law, raised in Atlanta, would spend summers in Fort Walton where her Uncle lived. Really miss good Key Lime pie. Website?
Posted by: Chisel

Re: Bannock Recipes - 01/07/13 04:39 AM

How about replacing water with milk ?
And how about throwing in an egg or two ?

I love my food richer in protein.

Posted by: hikermor

Re: Bannock Recipes - 01/07/13 02:13 PM

I thought about doing that, but it would result in my traditional Sunday morning pancake routine. Toss in some chopped walnuts as . I guess the bottom line is that if you have baking powder, flour, and a little salt, the sky is the limit.

This is making me hungry - time to whip up some pancakes.....
Posted by: Denis

Re: Bannock Recipes - 01/07/13 04:14 PM

I decided to try out making bannock recently and used this recipe: Bannock II. The only difference was I used a multigrain flour instead of regular white flour (a change for the better, I think).

After trying the recipe out at home, I made up some 2 serving ziplock baggies with everything but the water and took them with me on an overnighter I went on a couple days ago. It took a little trial and error (at first I tried cooking too much at once) but cooking it over the fire on a stick worked great. Definitely a great camp food.
Posted by: Outdoor_Quest

Re: Bannock Recipes - 01/07/13 08:19 PM

How does this compare to hardtack?

Looks better??

Blake

www.outdoorquest.biz

www.outdoorquest.blogspot.com
Posted by: hikermor

Re: Bannock Recipes - 01/08/13 12:39 AM

Made some yesterday, following the Bannock II recipe. I would call it "softtack." Eaten hot, it was hearty and delicious. I garnished mine with some applesauce.

I have always made pancakes on backpack trips when I had time for a leisurely breakfast. Hardtack looks like it could be made without specialized equipment (frying pan).
Posted by: Denis

Re: Bannock Recipes - 01/08/13 06:59 AM

Originally Posted By: Outdoor_Quest
How does this compare to hardtack?

I've never had any exposure to hardtack, but after reading about it, I'm thinking the big difference between bannock and hardtack is that bannock isn't intended to be made & then transported and/or stored.

Normally with bannock you'd bring the dry ingredients with you and then add water & cook it in the field (either in a fry pan or around a stick over the fire). When cooked, the bannock has a golden brown outer crust but is still soft inside, sort of like a biscuit.
Posted by: bacpacjac

Re: Bannock Recipes - 01/08/13 12:29 PM

Originally Posted By: Outdoor_Quest
How does this compare to hardtack?

Looks better??

Blake

www.outdoorquest.biz

www.outdoorquest.blogspot.com


I'm no expert, but my understanding is that the difference is basically that bannock is closer to bread and hardtack more like a cracker, accounted for by the addition, or not, of baking soda. (Although, there are many bannock recipes without it.) Then again, someone else told me that it all comes down to whether you bake (hardtack) or fry (bannock.)

Salt is another key ingredient, it would seem. Bannock (often) has salt, which makes it more perishable. Hardtack doesn't, whioh lends itself to better storage and transit.

My Scotish ancestors my curse me for this but, in my experience, bannock, hardtack, fry bread, quick bread, ring bread, stick bread.... are all pretty similar, and their differences seem to come down to the recipe and cooking methods used.
Posted by: bacpacjac

Re: Bannock Recipes - 01/08/13 12:34 PM

Originally Posted By: Denis


After trying the recipe out at home, I made up some 2 serving ziplock baggies with everything but the water and took them with me on an overnighter I went on a couple days ago. It took a little trial and error (at first I tried cooking too much at once) but cooking it over the fire on a stick worked great. Definitely a great camp food.


Way to go, Dennis. As Hikermor mentioned, cooking it over a campfire makes it taste the best, but home is the best place to try out new recipes. When you find one you like, do like Dennis, and make up a baggie or two of the dry mix and take it on your next trip.
Posted by: K9medic

Re: Bannock Recipes - 01/08/13 02:30 PM

[/quote]
My Scotish ancestors my curse me for this but, in my experience, bannock, hardtack, fry bread, quick bread, ring bread, stick bread.... are all pretty similar, and their differences seem to come down to the recipe and cooking methods used. [/quote]

Consider yourself cursed laugh

One of the problems I have on American based forums is the strange names you have for food and the confusing combinations, can someone please explain why you would cover a biscuit in gravy ??????

Around here

Bannocks are usually made from Oatmeal, a pinch of salt, egg and milk or water whisked till itís similar to a pancake mixture, then fried.

Pan bread is flour (sometimes with oats) pinch of salt, baking soda and a little water to make a dough then cooked in a dry pan.
Posted by: JerryFountain

Re: Bannock Recipes - 01/08/13 05:35 PM

[quote=K9mediccan someone please explain why you would cover a biscuit in gravy ??????


[/quote]

Because it tastes GREAT?? The best reason I know.

The best,

Jerry

p.s. Remember this is gravy, not juices.
Posted by: K9medic

Re: Bannock Recipes - 01/08/13 07:04 PM

Ooooook you would put gravy on a McVities Hobnob http://www.mcvities.co.uk/product/hobnobs shocked
Posted by: JerryFountain

Re: Bannock Recipes - 01/08/13 07:24 PM

K9medic,

Sorry, another of those language problems. A biscuit in America is a baking soda leavened bread baked in the oven. Similar to these other things we are talking about (Bannock, etc.). Those things you call biscuits we call cookies. Now I understand the problem. NOOOO I would not put gravy on a Hobnob.

The best,

Jerry
Posted by: barbarian

Re: Bannock Recipes - 01/08/13 07:36 PM

Quote:
Sorry, another of those language problems. A biscuit in America is a baking soda leavened bread baked in the oven. Similar to these other things we are talking about (Bannock, etc.). Those things you call biscuits we call cookies. Now I understand the problem. NOOOO I would not put gravy on a Hobnob.


Both hilarious and true.
Posted by: K9medic

Re: Bannock Recipes - 01/08/13 07:39 PM

Ok it looks like Biscuit (USA) = Scone (UK)
Posted by: Denis

Re: Bannock Recipes - 01/08/13 07:48 PM

Originally Posted By: K9medic
Ok it looks like Biscuit (USA) = Scone (UK)

Possibly, but maybe not smile. Up here at least (Canada) scones have sugar while biscuits don't. A scone would be a stand-alone breakfast item, or something to have with your coffee or tea, while biscuits are usually had along with a meal (especially soup or stew).
Posted by: K9medic

Re: Bannock Recipes - 01/08/13 08:34 PM

Over here Scones can be sweet or savoury, depending what you add to them. Usualy we have them as afternoon tea though, not for breakfast.
Posted by: chaosmagnet

Re: Bannock Recipes - 01/08/13 11:15 PM

We have scones in the US. They are in my experience identical to UK scones. They are most often a breakfast item here.
Posted by: UTAlumnus

Re: Bannock Recipes - 01/09/13 02:30 AM

Biscuit comparison

I whole heartedly agree about adding gravy. Its a waste of a good biscuit. Much better to split a hot one & add butter.
Posted by: JPickett

Re: Bannock Recipes - 01/09/13 05:02 PM

UTAlumnus, The only biscuit wasted is a biscuit uneaten.
I have biscuits with sausage gravy. Heaven on earth.
Though if I have too many I'll be in heaven for real.
Posted by: JerryFountain

Re: Bannock Recipes - 01/09/13 05:45 PM

JPickett,

Yes indeed!!!
Posted by: bws48

Re: Bannock Recipes - 01/09/13 08:25 PM

Here is a simple recipe for " traditional Scottish Soda Scones" that I like:

1/2 cup flour
1/2 tsp Baking Soda
1/2 tsp Cream of Tartar
pinch of salt
2-3 oz of milk

mix dry ingredients with enough milk to make a "workable dough". Spread out (roll) until about 1/2 inch thick. Cook in buttered frying pan over medium heat about 4 minutes, or until slightly brown, then turn over and cook until lightly brown.

This is not my recipe; I found it here (full instructions):
http://www.helium.com/items/1716122-how-to-make-traditional-scottish-soda-scones/

I like this because it is quick, simple and tasty. It also (being pan cooked) seems like Bannock, and might be adaptable for the field.