Your bug out bag has the wrong gear

Posted by: teacher

Your bug out bag has the wrong gear - 02/26/20 10:54 PM

Your BOB had all the wrong gear for all the wrong reasons.

From another discussion -- Listen, you're not going to hike off into the wild and survive with your BOB. You're going to throw it into the car and take it to a hotel or shelter or friends house till things blow over.
Posted by: chaosmagnet

Re: Your bug out bag has the wrong gear - 02/26/20 11:10 PM

I describe the kit I keep in the car as my “emergency kit”; it is not designed around “bugging out” as much as it is meant to provide for gear that I know how to use for a wide range of situations, from tightening a bolt on a kid’s bicycle to a multi-dozen-vehicle interstate pileup combining rescue, mass-casualty and communications emergencies.

Bugging out is much more likely to require an overnight bag and a hotel reservation.
Posted by: Jeanette_Isabelle

Re: Your bug out bag has the wrong gear - 02/27/20 12:05 AM

Originally Posted By: teacher
Listen, you're not going to hike off into the wild and survive with your BOB. You're going to throw it into the car and take it to a hotel or shelter or friends house till things blow over.

That describes my BOB, which is a suitcase with the usual items plus a box of alcohol swabs and refill items for my EDC bag.

Jeanette Isabelle
Posted by: hikermor

Re: Your bug out bag has the wrong gear - 02/27/20 03:50 AM

My "BOB", sitting about five feet away as I type this, is strongly influenced by the backpacks I used doing fairly extensive and frequent SAR many moons ago. Sometimes the necessary response was leisurely and all too often, immediate.

The bag was therefore packed with basics, along with fairly elaborate EMT items and enough gear to see me through about two nights out in the hills. Usually there were a few items of technical climbing gear.

The contents of my bag are considerably less complex these days, since I now only need to contend with the benign SoCal climate. But I can easily get ready for a typical day trip and make quick forays to the Channel Islands.

This set up was very useful when we had to evacuate a couple of years ago. The pack was tossed in the car,along with our caged cat,a bit more water, sleeping bag, emergency money supply and other odds and ends and we left at 2 AM. most of this stuff was not really used, but we lucked out, staying at no expense in a decent motel. I was still glad I had my basic gear, essentially the ten or so essentials, as well as other basic gear (suitable clothes for the climate and for comfortable sleeping).

Generally,your gear needs to be tweeked for different seasons and situations. This was especially true in southern Arizona, where you could be on snowshoes one week, and conducting swift water rescue the next.
Posted by: teacher

Re: Your bug out bag has the wrong gear - 02/28/20 08:17 PM

Think more in terms of a spy's bag than a wilderness survival one.
Posted by: Jeanette_Isabelle

Re: Your bug out bag has the wrong gear - 02/28/20 10:00 PM

Originally Posted By: teacher
Think more in terms of a spy's bag than a wilderness survival one.

What do you mean?

Jeanette Isabelle
Posted by: Russ

Re: Your bug out bag has the wrong gear - 02/28/20 11:58 PM

Maybe he means that your BOB should be hidden in an air vent and contain a Glock, lots of cash and various foreign currency, and a number of falsified ID’s with corresponding passports (in various names with pictures taken in disguise). Yeah... no, my BOB doesn’t have any of those “essentials” either. I think I know where my out-of-date passport is stored but I haven’t seen it in years. I am officially no longer a spy cool LOL
Posted by: teacher

Re: Your bug out bag has the wrong gear - 03/02/20 10:01 PM

No - in the spy world you need a bag to grab with supplies to get you to safety -- Usually a passport, tools, clothes, cash...
Posted by: KenK

Re: Your bug out bag has the wrong gear - 03/03/20 12:02 AM

Russ, of course you saaayyyy that you're not a spy. That's exactly what a spy would say. Spy gear is usually stored in a hidden closet, unless there is an entire communication bunker.

We've pretty much been living under the "bug in" thinking. Our only real limited resource is food and (much to my wife's concern) toilet paper. We have a natural gas whole house generator that provides well water, and probably a year's supply of horse hay (there's a hay shortage in WI, so we hoarded a bit to be safe). Right now we stock up with the thought of a 2-4 week self quarantine if one of us gets the big C. Heck, we can get almost anything we need via internet orders.

This area's biggest threats are tornadoes (get to the basement) and forest fire (leave the immediate area for a few days).

I keep what I call my "hiking pack" that is my survival kit. I don't do long treks in deep woods anymore. It contains typical short term (overnight?) survival gear (first aid kit, blades, ferro rod, lighter, tinder, 1 qt nalgene bottle, steripen, gps, compass, two headlamps, paracord, ...), but limited shelter (two 55 gallon bags and two headnets, I do consider our car shelter). Recently I threw in two of Doug's survival kits for good measure. We think our PLB has aged enough to be replaced this summer.

In addition to the PLB, we've been talking about better ... uh... home security equipment (in addition to the dogs). I suspect police response time could approach an hour. We'd be better to call the local ambulance crew.

Oddly, now that we've moved to a pretty rural area one of our biggest concerns is if we get into a big car accident, and nobody knows that there are two dogs and two horses at home that need care. When we go on longer drives we send a brief itinerary to family, and then let them know when we return. The folks around here are amazing. I've joked with out of state family that even a call to the local Shell station would bring the needed help.
Posted by: Russ

Re: Your bug out bag has the wrong gear - 03/03/20 02:20 PM

Terminology is often ill-defined. When some folk say bug-out-bag they think a bag with all the supplies you’ll need to survive in the wilderness for weeks/months/indefinitely — and you need to carry it there on foot. Yeah, that’s not going to happen. Carrying medium-long term supplies on your back is a non-starter.

I’ve often said that my bug-out-bag is a truck. For medium-long term you need a lot of supplies unless you have the requisite skill-sets and seriously expect to live off the land.

Teacher’s bag that you “grab with supplies to get you to safety” is what I consider to be a bail-out-bag. It’s small, light and minimalist because its only purpose is to get you to another place quickly; the other place already has what you need for the medium-long term.

County Comm Bail Out Bag, Gen 8 has good organization, compartments for essential paperwork, FAK, water bottle and other small essentials... approx 1386 cu.in.

On TeeVee a spy’s bag may have lots of cash/foreign currency and multiple passports because a spy may need to travel by air under a false identity — we’re not spies. For the rest of us: cash, ID, a change of clothes and a toothbrush. Tools are heavy, they should already be at the bug-out site (along with a firearm (more than one) which in some hands might be considered tools).

My goal is to get a bug-out-site suitable and well stocked, and dump my bug-out truck for something more minimalist.

Posted by: Russ

Re: Your bug out bag has the wrong gear - 03/04/20 09:00 PM

Terminology: What is the difference — size & purpose — of a Bug-Out bag, Bail-Out bag and Go bag. In my mind those bags have different functions. Is that discussion worthwhile?
Posted by: Jeanette_Isabelle

Re: Your bug out bag has the wrong gear - 03/04/20 09:30 PM

Don't get too hung up on terms. Pack what you need for your likely destination.

Jeanette Isabelle
Posted by: Russ

Re: Your bug out bag has the wrong gear - 03/04/20 10:38 PM

Generally I agree with that sentiment, but in order to discuss this subject, it’s good to have a common understanding. A lot of discussions on a bug-out bag go on to discuss something smaller that would be good for maybe 24 hours.

So definitely pack what you need, but for the sake of discussion, it would be nice to have a common terminology.
Posted by: chaosmagnet

Re: Your bug out bag has the wrong gear - 03/05/20 01:35 AM

Originally Posted By: Russ
Terminology: What is the difference — size & purpose — of a Bug-Out bag, Bail-Out bag and Go bag. In my mind those bags have different functions. Is that discussion worthwhile?


"Go Bag" -- A kit designed around "I expect to leave this place on short or no notice to do a thing." I travel quite a bit for my job, and my overnight bag fits this description. I can be out the door for a 1-4 night trip in under five minutes. I have another bag set up for IT support. While that's not my job any more, every so often I am doing something for work or for a friend or relative, and it's convenient for me to have those things in its own bag.

"Bail Out Bag" -- A kit designed around "I may have to leave this conveyance that I'm in abruptly." A kayaker may have fire-makings, communications, and first aid gear, for example.

"Bug Out Bag" -- Here I've seen a lot of different definitions. Mine is a kit designed around "I may have to leave this place abruptly." I do not maintain one of these. You may look at my car-based emergency kit and call it a Bug Out Bag. Neither I nor the bag would be offended, even though that's not how I think of it.

These are my definitions for me and my situation and use cases, yours may be different.
Posted by: hikermor

Re: Your bug out bag has the wrong gear - 03/05/20 03:25 AM

"wrong gear" is a questionable term. I keep my "core bag/goody bag" assembled with basic ten essential/survival gear stufff, a lot of which has pretty broad application.

A recent example. On Super Tuesday I supervised a polling place and at one point i needed a bit of string to hang an item. the most convenient source was my goody bag, which had lengths of mason's twine, normally used to construct impromptu shelters or bivys. But here was another use in a distinctly urban situation. Duct tape is another classic example of a broadly useful, versatile item.

Definitely if you have time, you can fine tune the contents of a bag to become more suited to the situation.
Posted by: CANOEDOGS

Re: Your bug out bag has the wrong gear - 03/06/20 08:50 PM

i have no need for any of this as wilderness travel is my game. but looking at a youtube of a guys gear i was struck by the things he had that called out "i'm a prepper,rob my stuff!".a hat with a tactical logo,fancy sunglasses and a $100 back pack.
Posted by: Russ

Re: Your bug out bag has the wrong gear - 03/06/20 09:49 PM

Originally Posted By: teacher
Your BOB had all the wrong gear for all the wrong reasons.

From another discussion -- Listen, you're not going to hike off into the wild and survive with your BOB. You're going to throw it into the car and take it to a hotel or shelter or friends house till things blow over.

The post in the discussion is mistaken in stating that your BOB has the wrong gear. Just because you have a BOB with gear & supplies for an extended stay in the wilderness does not mean it’s the wrong bag for a hotel stay or camping out on a friend’s couch. You may only use a clean shirt and socks from the BOB, but at least you have a clean shirt and socks. If you’d bugged out to a hotel with only pocket carry or a Bailout bag, you might not have much to take you through an overnight. You’ll be wearing the same shirt and underwear when you check out.

Different bags for different purposes, but that doesn’t mean a BOB won’t be okay for a hotel stay. I’d rather have too much than too little so a BOB would beat out a (necessarily minimalist) Bailout bag everyday.

OTOH, a Go bag may have just what you need if you had a hotel stay or overnight in mind when you put it together. Currently my Go bag (to call it that) is like a 24 hour kit — through the day and overnight. When I was flying on active duty I’d often take a bingo bag just in case we landed at a field other than the one planned. If everything went as planned I’d go back to my room and drop my bingo bag in the corner unopened. If we had a problem and landed somewhere else, I had an overnight bag. Sometimes landing at a different field was planned and I took the same bag; call it a Go bag.
Posted by: Russ

Re: Your bug out bag has the wrong gear - 03/12/20 05:14 PM

This thread started me thinking that a Bailout bag would be a good place to keep the EDC items that I stopped carrying and maybe also for back-ups to my pocket carry. A cellphone goes with me only occasionally and if I’m going somewhere unfamiliar I’ll want a GPS. Items needing battery power might also need a power bank.

I have had a messenger bag unused and available, good for a small kit and fairly inconspicuous. Considering the COVID-19 issue, I will add a couple N-99 isolation masks and a couple pair of nitrile gloves in a ziplock bag. A minimalist FAK will also be included in another ziplock.

So, the result of all that thinking was a Bailout bag consisting of:
Bag: Timbuk2 XS Messenger Bag — 549 ci, nylon.
GPS: Oregon 600.
Cellphone: Kyocera DuraXV, 4G LTE, waterproof/shockproof...
Power: Anker 10,000 mAH plus cables
Ziplock1: Minimal FAK, one pair of nitrile gloves.
Ziplock2: N-99 Isolation masks & add’l nitrile gloves.
Additional cash in a small pouch.
My Kindle for passing the time reading if it comes to that.
Readers.
Back-up locking folder & Leatherman
Back-up 1xAA LED flashlight.

All that and room for more. Any thoughts???
Posted by: KenK

Re: Your bug out bag has the wrong gear - 03/12/20 05:55 PM

Russ,
I'm not exactly sure what your situation of focus is, but I like your list in more civil places, where shelter, heat, and water are available.

After a fist aid kit discussion with the wife this morning, maybe sterile gauze in a ziploc and duct tape.

This gets me to wondering if I still have a first aid kit in my truck. It got emptied during our big move. Sigh.
Posted by: chaosmagnet

Re: Your bug out bag has the wrong gear - 03/12/20 05:58 PM

Spending a lot of time, as I do, around firearms, I carry a compact trauma kit. Maybe a couple extra batteries for your flashlight. Also, consider a Ritter PSP, a 2 person Heatsheets blanket, and some kind of water container. Maybe also some chlorine dioxide tablets.
Posted by: hikermor

Re: Your bug out bag has the wrong gear - 03/12/20 06:12 PM

Originally Posted By: chaosmagnet
Spending a lot of time, as I do, around firearms, I carry a compact trauma kit. Maybe a couple extra batteries for your flashlight. Also, consider a Ritter PSP, a 2 person Heatsheets blanket, and some kind of water container. Maybe also some chlorine dioxide tablets.


Exactly. FAKs should reflect the most likely used environment. Mine is less concerned with firearms related injuries (most of the time) and is more gear toward sprains and breaks that will halt evacuation or mobility from back country.

Training is the most critical component, since you must first recognize the problem before you can do anything meaningful to correct it.

An example of lack of training from years ago. A victim shot himself in the leg, bleeding profusely. The sole measure taken by his companions was to loosen his belt. He died.
Posted by: KenK

Re: Your bug out bag has the wrong gear - 03/12/20 08:49 PM

That is a great point: "FAKs should reflect the most likely used environment."

Thanks! And the same for hiking/bug out kits, I suppose.

In my mind I was thinking moderately serious cuts, because of what I do and my own history. Broken bones for me have just been a car ride to the ER with limited immobilization.

And, very serious injury would be a call to an ambulance. I don't go deep into the backcountry these days.
Posted by: Russ

Re: Your bug out bag has the wrong gear - 03/13/20 02:05 PM

Thanks for the responses. Not mentioned is a 20’ length of 550 paracord. I could easily drop a DR PSP in the bag, but question what would be gained. This “Bailout bag” is for a more or less benign environment (a true benign environment doesn’t require anything but a smile) where I would like to take additional gear that some here might consider EDC. EDC for me is pocket carry.

The FAK is minimal and not designed for more that small cuts/scrapes, although in addition to the band-aids it does have a 4x4 and EMT shears which may allow for expedient first aid. The FAK in the kit includes:
Quote:
3ea. 2” X 3” Fabric Bandages
3ea. Fabric Finger Tip Bandages
3ea. Fabric Knuckle Bandages
5ea. 7/8” X 3” Fabric Strip Bandages
4ea. Alcohol Prep Pad
4ea. Povidone-Iodine Prep Pad
3ea. Triple Antibiotic Ointment
1ea. 4” x 4” Gauze Pad
and 5.5” trauma shears. I may add a small roll of first aid type tape.

I won’t be adding water purification, that’s outside the scope of this bag; I might add a water bottle. I have added a 5x8 spiral notebook & pen for taking notes.

Like most kits should be, it’s a work in progress.
Posted by: teacher

Re: Your bug out bag has the wrong gear - 03/13/20 09:26 PM

Mine has: water, jacket, otc meds, sometimes a mutlitool.
Posted by: KenK

Re: Your bug out bag has the wrong gear - 03/13/20 11:57 PM

And ... good EMT shears can cut a pizza in a real emergency!!
Posted by: Russ

Re: Your bug out bag has the wrong gear - 03/14/20 01:53 AM

Always good to have your priorities straight. wink
Posted by: Russ

Re: Your bug out bag has the wrong gear - 03/21/20 03:41 PM

I made some additions to the kit, most previously mentioned. I’m staying with the Timbuk2 XS Messenger Bag (549 ci, nylon) for now. It’s a tight fit, but it makes me prioritize to keep it minimal.

The current contents include:
Quote:
Garmin Oregon 600 GPS.
Kyocera DuraXV, 4G LTE cellphone, waterproof/shockproof...
Anker 10,000 mAh power-bank, plus cables
Ziplock1: Minimal FAK, one pair of nitrile gloves.
Ziplock2: N-99 Isolation masks & add’l nitrile gloves.
Additional cash in a small pouch.
My Kindle for passing the time reading if it comes to that.
Readers.
Leatherman.
Back-up 1xAA LED flashlight.
20’ length of 550 paracord
16 oz, Nalgene water bottle
5x8 spiral notebook & pen.

The FAK in the kit includes:
3ea. 2” X 3” Fabric Bandages
3ea. Fabric Finger Tip Bandages
3ea. Fabric Knuckle Bandages
5ea. 7/8” X 3” Fabric Strip Bandages
4ea. Alcohol Prep Pad
4ea. Povidone-Iodine Prep Pad
3ea. Triple Antibiotic Ointment
1ea. 4” x 4” Gauze Pad
1 ea. Generic/waterproof First Aid tape
5.5” trauma shears.

I’m considering going with a smaller power-bank. The Anker 10K’s weight is not insignificant and a 3350mAh PB is available that would probably be enough for the short term this bag is intended. That’s enough for two full charges on the phone, and it’s much smaller and lighter in weight.

Again, it’s a work in progress.
Posted by: teacher

Re: Your bug out bag has the wrong gear - 04/14/20 03:31 PM

I've moved up to larger water bottles; 24 or 30oz
Posted by: haertig

Re: Your bug out bag has the wrong gear - 04/14/20 11:28 PM

During this pandemic, "bugging out" means moving from the bedroom to the kitchen to the family room, and then circling back. So my bug out gear consists of my bathrobe and slippers. And I just wear this gear, instead of stuffing it into a BOB and carrying it.
Posted by: Chisel

Re: Your bug out bag has the wrong gear - 04/16/20 07:01 PM

It is true that many of us most likely will be bugging out from town A to town B, and settle in a hotel or with relatives, but let's remember that we may get stuck in the middle and then we may need that knife or stove.
Posted by: Chisel

Re: Your bug out bag has the wrong gear - 04/16/20 07:06 PM

Speaking of town A & B, I can see some use for outdoorsy or 'bushcrafty' items even after reaching town B. For example, I am planning to build another home in town B next year ( if corona allows us!!!)I will be alone (no family) in town B during the construction phase, which means I may be 'roughing it' time to time, like sleeping in the construction site and making a breakfast in the morning on a stove.

So, a few camping/bushcrafting items are not a bad idea even if you are a city guy, and the wilderness is not a regular part of your life.
Posted by: hikermor

Re: Your bug out bag has the wrong gear - 04/17/20 02:10 AM

If one ever experiences a utility interruption that lasts more than a few hours or so,camping equipment will come in very handy on several occasions, I have hauled out sleeping bags, stoves, and lights and found them very useful....
Posted by: Chisel

Re: Your bug out bag has the wrong gear - 04/19/20 07:18 AM

Exactly.
And there are many cases where they would be useful and helpful

A few years back before retiring, a work colleague had a dinner at home and while prepparing food, suddenly gas supply stopped. He called a few friends who brought their camping stoves and managed to make a few nice dishes for the party.
Posted by: LCranston

Re: Your bug out bag has the wrong gear - 04/20/20 02:37 PM

Originally Posted By: hikermor
If one ever experiences a utility interruption that lasts more than a few hours or so,camping equipment will come in very handy on several occasions, I have hauled out sleeping bags, stoves, and lights and found them very useful....


+1. half of my gear for prepping eventually gets used by my 2 boy scouts, lol

My wife used to think I was paranoid. Since 90% of my preps have come in useful, now he just rolls her eyes at me....

wink
Posted by: teacher

Re: Your bug out bag has the wrong gear - 05/13/20 06:41 PM

I think another way to approach a BOB is to have a shelf of gear to add if necessary.