Primative Firemaking

Posted by: Ors

Primative Firemaking - 11/18/18 11:32 PM

Just curious how many here have primative firemaking skills. Bow and drill ll...hand drill...

We go to a song circle every summer, and a couple of years ago, there was a group teaching primative firemaking. Every fire circle that year began with someone starting the first the old fashioned way.

Seems to me it would be a good skill to have.

No one was teaching it in SoCal, and with good reason considering the current fires, and Iím not finding local classes here in Florida, but maybe itís not something people are thinking about here.

Just wondering who has those chops.
Posted by: dougwalkabout

Re: Primative Firemaking - 11/18/18 11:42 PM

I haven't managed fire with the bowdrill/firedrill yet, although I have managed blisters and cursing. It's on my bucket list.

But I have learned to make fire with old-school flint and steel using found tinder. (I'm not talking ferro rods, which are blowtorches in comparison).

Upon reflection, the takeaway for me was not the method of making spark, but the concentrated discipline of finding, preparing, and using natural tinder that can take a spark from anything.

Is that the most important part of the equation? I begin to think it might be. It requires you to be intensely aware of the environment you walk through, and to align yourself with it.
Posted by: hikermor

Re: Primative Firemaking - 11/18/18 11:51 PM

I suppose you can make a case for proficiency with bow drill,flint and steel, fire piston, etc but I must admit I just don't get it. it is very easy to carry premium matches w/tinder in a waterproof case, one (or two) Bic lighters, or other modern appliances, which can be lighter than the primitive items. I do use a ferro rod and steel to ignite my iso-butane canister stove - works very well.

I am very often in situations (above timberline, in caves, etc) where conventional fuels are not readily available, so bring on the liquid fuels. I have been in situations here in SoCal where a conventional wood fire is inadvisable or prohibited, although that is a fairly special case.

Certainly not a bad skill to possess, but realistically not all that critical.
Posted by: Montanero

Re: Primative Firemaking - 11/19/18 02:41 AM

There is something to be said for primitive fire making. It is a skill that could be useful, but requires a good deal of practice and learning the types of wood suitable for it. With so many other options, few learn it anymore. A bow drill or other fire drill is not something I would carry, but knowing how (and practicing!!!) is something to put together in an extreme situation. The trouble is that in a really extreme situation you may not have any tool or the right materials. It is not a waste of time learning how to do it (and practice!!!).
Posted by: Ors

Re: Primative Firemaking - 11/19/18 03:05 AM

dougwalkabout brings up a good point. I think part of this for me is about my awareness and being in tune with the environment. Being in relationship with the natural world in a good way.

Like Montanero says, it takes practice and knowledge of what types of wood work best.

I guess Iíve liked the idea Tom Brown puts forth in his book about outdoor survival about feeling at ease in the forest, with only a knife, and knowing you can find everything else you need to be comfortable.

Not that primitive fire making would be my FIRST choice, but for my own sense of space and place in this world, I think Iím going to learn.
Posted by: Phaedrus

Re: Primative Firemaking - 11/19/18 06:12 AM

I'm not as proficient as I'd like to be. For me the appeal is mostly academic, a link to the ways of the past. About 5% of my interest is practical; while the possibility is remote I could wind up in a situation where I had to improvise fire with few or no tools. Realistically in a true survival situation where fire meant the difference between life and death- and I had no lighter, matches, firesteel, etc.- I'd probably be a goner! Friction fire is challenging under the best of conditions and pretty dicey in bad weather.
Posted by: Montanero

Re: Primative Firemaking - 11/19/18 01:05 PM

I have seen some, who do it a lot, get a fire going in less than a minute. But they do it a lot, and carry their own small kit with prepared tinder. Like with other fire making methods, the preparation is most important.

You have not really failed until you have stopped trying!
Posted by: hikermor

Re: Primative Firemaking - 11/19/18 03:37 PM

Sometimes it can be insanely difficult to ignite a fire, and sometimes it can be insanely easy. A few years ago, we had a 7,000 acre fire ignited by bullet strikes from roadside target shooters - a case of light fuels and very dry conditions.

I have worked with steel tools on rocky, high silicate limestone where tool strikes were creating sparks. We were in dry grass lands, but fortunately did not start anything. I have read that at least one fire has been ignited in SoCal by sunlight focused just right (or wrong!) through a broken glass bottle base.

My most favorite fire starter used to be a carbide lamp, now technologically obsolete because of nearly unobtainable fuel. Light and fire in one handy appliance, reasonably dependable and quickly fixed.

Although I am reasonably weight conscious when hiking, I always carry redundant fire starting items, at least three. Making fire is a fundamental survival skill.
Posted by: DaveL

Re: Primative Firemaking - 11/19/18 09:43 PM

FYI
Carbide is available in my local army surplus store, also on line. Spit and light, 😀
Posted by: hikermor

Re: Primative Firemaking - 11/19/18 10:28 PM

The problem with carbide is maintaining it in an altered, dry condition. this was not a problem in Tucson, where I employed carbide regularly, but here in California, it degrades with great ease, either in its original canisters or in tightly sealed spare lamp chambers.

I have gone to electric lighting exclusively. Even there a way exists. I have a sparker which charges through a USB port. I haven't used it yet for real, but it ought to start most types of tinder quite readily.

As I recall, there were some pretty complicated shipping regulations or carbide. All the cavers i know have gone electric over the past few years.
Posted by: Ors

Re: Primative Firemaking - 11/20/18 05:18 AM

hikermor...you mean something like a Tesla lighter? Small plasma charge, and now I see on Kickstarter they have one with a long adjustable neck...
Posted by: Herman30

Re: Primative Firemaking - 11/20/18 05:36 AM

In Finland there is a company that sell electric lighters.

https://kaarilighters.com/en/frontpage/

I have the "Loimu".
Posted by: Ors

Re: Primative Firemaking - 11/20/18 05:50 AM

It works well for getting tinder going? Reliable?
Posted by: hikermor

Re: Primative Firemaking - 11/20/18 02:38 PM

https://www.rei.com/product/129302/ultimate-survival-technologies-tekfire-lighter

This looks like about the same thing. No experience with it, but a spark is a spark,so I imagine light tinder and some care is needed. But with a solar panel/power bank you can transfer electrons from phone to headlamp to lighter as circumstances dictate -nice!
Posted by: Ors

Re: Primative Firemaking - 11/21/18 12:26 PM

I think Iíll be adding something like this to my kit.

I got a laugh...in another one of this gentlemanís videos he said, ďHopefully any primitive fire Iím making is by choice, with a lighter in my pocket.Ē

Good point there!
Posted by: bacpacjac

Re: Primative Firemaking - 11/21/18 06:15 PM

I've been working on the bow drill for a little over a year now and I'm mostly terrible at it. I can get an ember in perfect conditions, using a pre-tested set, but I have yet to make my own set or get an ember outside in less than perfect conditions. It take a lot of practice.

Originally Posted By: dougwalkabout
I haven't managed fire with the bowdrill/firedrill yet, although I have managed blisters and cursing. It's on my bucket list.

But I have learned to make fire with old-school flint and steel using found tinder. (I'm not talking ferro rods, which are blowtorches in comparison).

Upon reflection, the takeaway for me was not the method of making spark, but the concentrated discipline of finding, preparing, and using natural tinder that can take a spark from anything.

Is that the most important part of the equation? I begin to think it might be. It requires you to be intensely aware of the environment you walk through, and to align yourself with it.


I believe you're right, Doug. Getting an ember is only the first step in primitive fire. Getting and sustaining a flame is the universal skill. Learning to turn those hard-earned primitive embers into flame is an excellent way to get really good at fire prep. It's heartbreaking when it doesn't work.
Posted by: EMPnotImplyNuclear

Re: Primative Firemaking - 11/23/18 03:09 AM

Originally Posted By: bacpacjac
I've been working on the bow drill for a little over a year now and I'm mostly terrible at it. I can get an ember in perfect conditions, using a pre-tested set, but I have yet to make my own set or get an ember outside in less than perfect conditions. It take a lot of practice.

Hi,
have you been taking notes?
Posted by: Pete

Re: Primative Firemaking - 11/25/18 05:20 AM

when I was in Kenya, many years ago, everyone in the Masai tribe could make fire by rubbing a stick between their hands. No bow. And I do mean everyone ... old ladies, teenagers, women, men. it is their daily system for making fires.

therefore, you too can be just as good. it is just practice. only that.
Posted by: BruceZed

Re: Primative Firemaking - 11/25/18 07:01 PM

Remember that Kenya is centered at the equator and the Masai live mostly in Savanna. That means a DRY, HOT climate that never get very cold or wet. If you live in that type of climate, then yes. Just remember that primitive fire techniques were created and used in specific areas for specific reasons.
Posted by: Pete

Re: Primative Firemaking - 11/29/18 05:54 AM

Bruce ... yes. arid and hot conditions where the Maasai live.
Posted by: KenK

Re: Primative Firemaking - 11/29/18 03:39 PM

The thread got me wondering about primitive fire starting in less arid regions:

https://www.perfectdayshawaii.com/carol-silva-fire/#.XAAGadtKjmE

Someday I'd like to visit Hawaii!!! Maybe I should start a GoFundMe page??!!

While I find primitive fire starting VERY interesting, to me it takes so much skill and knowledge of local woods that I don't consider it so much a survival skill. Kudos to those who can do that in-field!!

Today it is just seems so much easier and "safer" to carry a lighter and a ferro rod as backup.
Posted by: hikermor

Re: Primative Firemaking - 11/29/18 05:27 PM

Agree heartily. Not much weight or baggage in a lighter and backups. I like matches as a backup to a lighter. In fact, in the really critical lighting situations I have encountered, it happens that I have always used matches and they have done the job.

The real trick is going from the first flame or coal to burning fuel and getting the fire to be self-sustaining.
Posted by: Russ

Re: Primative Firemaking - 11/29/18 06:11 PM

Lightning is a great way to collect a fire ó itís a gift from Zeus, donít let it go out. Later, some cave dweller started a fire - probably by accident - and realized he could start a fire at will by striking a couple rocks together, as long as they were the right rocks. So did fire-by-friction come before or after sparks from rocks? Does it matter and who besides an archaeologist would care... (btw, of the above, I made up everything starting with ďZeusĒ.

Iím not a cave dweller nor a minimalist,

Matches are a great method for making a fire. I used strike-anywhere matches as a kid when the woodstove at home needed lighting. One match and you have a fire. Paper book matches would have sufficed, but I really liked wood strike anywhere matches. These days the chemistry has changed and theyíre Strike ALMOST anywhere matches, so they too need back-ups. ...

Regarding back-ups:
At which temperatures (cold) do Bic/butane lighters typically fail?
At which temperatures (cold) do Zippo/naphtha lighters typically fail?

Considering that cold & wet have a detrimental effect on oneís ability to light fires, why carry a primary method of making a fire that is easy/convenient, and a back-up that is in a word, difficult.

Why would anyone consider friction to be a back-up to a lighter? Seriously.
Posted by: dougwalkabout

Re: Primative Firemaking - 11/29/18 07:29 PM

Originally Posted By: Russ
Regarding back-ups:
At which temperatures (cold) do Bic/butane lighters typically fail?

They don't actually fail. They just need to be warmed in your pocket or hand to vapourize some gas. I carry a Bic in temperatures far below freezing and never have been unable to make fire with one.

Originally Posted By: Russ
Why would anyone consider friction to be a back-up to a lighter? Seriously.

It's not about stuff, it's about skills. Practicing primitive fire techniques makes you a much better fire lighter regardless of the method at hand -- especially in difficult conditions.
Posted by: Russ

Re: Primative Firemaking - 11/29/18 08:23 PM

This is where minimalists and I part ways. I can understand going solely with friction or a ferro rod (or a couple of the right rocks) as primary with a lighter as back-up. As you state...
Originally Posted By: dougwalkabout
... I carry a Bic in temperatures far below freezing and never have been unable to make fire with one. ...
...which tells me that a Bic would make a great back-up, in case the conditions were not favorable to fire-by-friction or spark; or maybe you are down to one hand ...

My primary method for lighting a fire is a Bic and it wouldnít bother me a bit to carry a second Bic as back-up. Itís really about tinder and fuel.

I found a Bic lighter on the park lawn while walking the dog on a frosty morning; it was cold and damp when I picked it up and then warmed a bit in my pocket and at home. It lit the first time I tried.
Posted by: dougwalkabout

Re: Primative Firemaking - 11/29/18 10:15 PM

I don't think the OP, nor anyone here, has suggested that primitive methods are the recommended solution for making fire. That would be nonsense.

As you say, two Bics cover most situations.

But you still need tinder. Maybe you always have some in your pocket.

But maybe, in a given situation, you don't. And as I suggested earlier, you greatly advance your skills when you experiment with primitive methods, because careful selection and preparation of tinder absolutely determines success or failure. When the chips are down, that applies to Bics as well.

My 2c.
Posted by: Russ

Re: Primative Firemaking - 11/29/18 11:56 PM

Yep, totally agree with the key to a fire is in the tinder regardless of ignition source. I do in fact carry tinder, but thatís saved for when I canít find something in the local flora that will suffice. I have been camping in PNW when finding anything dry enough to call tinder and start a fire was near impossible (campground by Crater Lake, Oregon), it was a cold, wet night.
Posted by: EMPnotImplyNuclear

Re: Primative Firemaking (Rudiger Fire Roll) - 11/30/18 12:48 AM

Originally Posted By: Ors
Just curious how many here have primative firemaking skills. Bow and drill ll...hand drill... Just wondering who has those chops.

I dont have the chops smile


However, this is where i'd start, very thorough info here
wildwoodsurvival.com/survival/fire/


Graph of Storm's Wood Density and Specific Gravity Data
Quote:
I then graphed this data on a 3D graph. You see a very prominent peak at about a density of 0.38 for fireboard and spindle. but there is another peak at fireboard 0.53 and spindle 0.821.

A Friction Fire Inquiry: Hand Drill


Wildwood Survival ē View topic - Chaga bow drill made with a new technique
Bow Drill Using One Hand With Mushroom As Board - Stay Primitive My Friend



Better than bowdrill?

Rudiger Roll - No Ash - No tools - All Natural - Fire Roll Friction Fire - On the spot - Primitive - Boggy Creek Beast

Sir Vival Eats roadkill, eats frogleg from snake stomach , snorkle hunt for ducks, pigs...
Homage to RŁdiger Nehberg AKA "Sir Vival" - Boggy Creek Beast

Rudiger Roll Friction Fire - Boggy Creek Beast 77 videos4,937 viewsLast updated on Aug 28, 2018
Quote:

This playlist includes numerous variations of this method including all natural material performed outdoors. The videos below and their content are a result of my own research and experimentation. It's extremely versatile and easy to learn. This list is not all inclusive. I have used many more plant fibers including Fireweed, Ramie, Flax, various tree and vine fibers.

Rudiger Roll : Natural Rolling Surfaces - Boggy Creek Beast 6 videos 434 views Last updated on Aug 28, 2018
Quote:

Split Wood - Stone - Bark ( and any combination of those).
Play all



Rudiger Roll video 29: Tree Bark Mini Fire Roll . No Tools Friction Fire
by Boggy Creek Beast

3:58

Rudiger Roll video 14 : Split Wood Mini Fire Roll Friction Fire - Primitive - Bushcraft
by Boggy Creek Beast

2:53

Rudiger Roll video 30: Stones Mini Fire Roll . No Tools Friction Fire
by Boggy Creek Beast

6:31

Rudiger Roll using Stones (Rust and Cotton) . Rust Fire Roll
by Boggy Creek Beast

3:40

Rudiger Roll video 21: No Ashes - No Tools . Bark, Stone, Hemp . Fire Roll No Tools or Ash Primitive
by Boggy Creek Beast

2:31


Rudiger Roll - No Ash - No tools - All Natural - Fire Roll Friction Fire - On the spot - Primitive
by Boggy Creek Beast

5:39




Rudiger Roll : Plant Fibers - Boggy Creek Beast 16 videos 614 views Last updated on Aug 28, 2018
Quote:

These are some of the plant fibers that I personally came up with to use with this method. Flax, Fireweed, and Ramie work good, too. This is not an all inclusive list. I have used many more including various tree and vine fibers.

Rudiger Roll video 5 : Jute Twine - Plant Fiber - Fire Roll Friction Fire Jute Twine
by Boggy Creek Beast

4:56

Rudiger Roll Milkweed demonstration (Asclepias) primitive - friction fire on the spot
by Boggy Creek Beast

4:42

Nettle Fire Roll : Wood Nettle (AKA Canadian Nettle) . Rudiger Roll demo - Deer Dung - Primitive
by Boggy Creek Beast

6:42

Rudiger Roll demonstration using Bittersweet Vine ( Fire Roll Friction Fire Vine Natural - Primitive
by Boggy Creek Beast

6:54

Rudiger Roll demonstration using Dogbane - Indian Hemp Fire Roll - Primitive
by Boggy Creek Beast

5:55

Rudiger Roll Part 9: Raffia Palm - Fire Roll Friction Fire Raffia palm fiber
by Boggy Creek Beast

4:12

Rudiger Roll Part 10: Sisal (Agave) Fire Roll Friction Fire Sisal fiber
by Boggy Creek Beast

5:19

Rudiger Roll video 15 : Yucca - Fire Roll Friction Fire Yucca fiber
by Boggy Creek Beast

5:59

Rudiger Roll video 19 : Poplar bark (Tree bark) Poplar Fire Roll Friction Fire
by Boggy Creek Beast

6:40

Rudiger Roll Friction Fire False Nettle - Fire Roll Nettle - Primitive
by Boggy Creek Beast

6:27

Rudiger Roll video 21: No Ashes - No Tools . Bark, Stone, Hemp . Fire Roll No Tools or Ash Primitive
by Boggy Creek Beast

2:31

Rudiger Roll video 43 : Hickory Bark Fiber Friction Fire (Tree bark fire roll friction fire )
by Boggy Creek Beast

2:34

Rudiger Roll video 48 : Slippery Elm Bark ( Tree Bark Fiber Ulmus rubra Friction Fire )
by Boggy Creek Beast

3:36

Rudiger Roll video 49 : Kudzu - Wild Vine ( Pueraria montana Fire Roll Friction Fire )
by Boggy Creek Beast

4:26

Rudiger Roll video 52 : Velvetleaf fiber ( Indian Mallow Fire Roll Friction Fire )
by Boggy Creek Beast

6:23


Rudiger Roll - No Ash - No tools - All Natural - Fire Roll Friction Fire - On the spot - Primitive
by Boggy Creek Beast

5:39



Rudiger Roll : Natural Accelerants - Boggy Creek Beast 20 videos 619 views Last updated on Oct 6, 2018
Quote:

These are the best natural accelerants that I personally discovered to use with this method.




Rudiger Roll video 18 : Bracket Fungus - natural accelerant - Nettle Fire Roll
by Boggy Creek Beast

4:51

Rudiger Roll video 20 : Rust (iron oxide) natural accelerant - Rust Fire Roll Friction Fire
by Boggy Creek Beast

3:02

Rudiger Roll video 23 : Dung (manure) natural accelerant - Fire Roll Friction Fire Dung
by Boggy Creek Beast

1:55

Rudiger Roll using a random fungus ( Fire Roll Friction Fire Bracket Fungus )
by Boggy Creek Beast

5:12

Rudiger Roll video 36 : Coffee ( Instant Coffee ) Fire Roll Friction Fire
by Boggy Creek Beast

2:39

Rudiger Roll video 37 : Tobacco (Cigar) Fire Roll Friction Fire
by Boggy Creek Beast

2:39

Rudiger Roll video 44 : Spearmint - natural accelerant ( Mint Fire Roll Friction Fire mint )
by Boggy Creek Beast

5:40

Rudiger Roll video 45 : Mugwort - natural accelerant ( Herb Artemisia Fire Roll Friction Fire)
by Boggy Creek Beast

3:05

Rudiger Roll video 46 : Orange Peel - natural accelerant ( Citrus Fire Roll Friction Fire )
by Boggy Creek Beast

4:24

Rudiger Roll video 47 : Lavender - natural accelerant (Herb - Lavender Fire Roll Friction Fire )
by Boggy Creek Beast

3:04

Rudiger Roll video 50 : Basil - natural accelerant ( Herb - Basil - Fire Roll Friction Fire )
by Boggy Creek Beast

3:08

Rudiger Roll video 51 : Sage - Natural Accelerant ( Sage Fire Roll Friction Fire )
by Boggy Creek Beast

2:54

Rudiger Roll video 53 : Tea - Natural accelerant - Chamomile, Mint, Green - Fire Roll Friction Fire
by Boggy Creek Beast

7:22

Rudiger Roll video 54 : Coffee (regular ground) Natural acclerant - Fire Roll Friction Fire
by Boggy Creek Beast

6:47

Rudiger Roll video 55 : Catnip - Natural accelerant ( Nepeta cataria ) Fire Roll Friction Fire
by Boggy Creek Beast

4:22

Rudiger Roll video 25: Coal (sedimentary rock) Fire Roll Friction Fire
by Boggy Creek Beast

2:32

Rudiger Roll video 26 : Shells (Calcium carbonate)
by Boggy Creek Beast

3:24

Rudiger Roll video 27 : Antler (Bone) Fire Roll Friction Fire
by Boggy Creek Beast

3:40

Rudiger Roll Video 56 : Walnut Husk - Natural accelerant ( Fire Roll Friction Fire Walnut )
by Boggy Creek Beast

3:56

Rudiger Roll Dung - How to make fire with Rabbit Poo - Fire Roll Friction Fire
by Boggy Creek Beast


Rudiger Roll : Chemical Accelerants - Boggy Creek Beast 12 videos 116 views Last updated on Sep 14, 2016
Quote:

Some of the better more commonly available chemical accelerants that I discovered to use with this method.

Rudiger Roll video 34 : Oxygen Absorber .. Fire Roll Friction Fire Rust - Desiccant
by Boggy Creek Beast

3:40

Rudiger Roll video 28 : Battery (Manganese dioxide) Fire Roll Friction Fire
by Boggy Creek Beast

2:47

Rudiger Roll video 22 : Potassium Permanganate - Fire Roll Pot Perm
by Boggy Creek Beast

5:27

Rudiger Roll video 33 : Baking Soda (Sodium bicarbonate) Fire Roll Friction Fire
by Boggy Creek Beast

4:06

Rudiger Roll video 31: Hand Warmer - Fire Roll Friction Fire Rust - Hot Hands
by Boggy Creek Beast

7:01

Rudiger Roll video 32 : Instant Cold Pack (Ammonium nitrate) Fire Roll Friction Fire
by Boggy Creek Beast

6:32

Rudiger Roll video 35: Soda Wash (Soda Ash)+ DIY Easy Hand warmer - Fire Roll Friction Fire
by Boggy Creek Beast

5:18

Rudiger Roll video 24 : Calcium Hypochlorite (Bleach) Fire Roll Friction Fire
by Boggy Creek Beast

5:05

Rudiger Roll using newspaper with chemical catalysts ( Fire Roll battery demo)
by Boggy Creek Beast

7:58

Rudiger Roll - Chemicals & random rolling mediums PT 1
by Boggy Creek Beast

8:06

Rudiger Roll - Chemicals & random rolling mediums PT 2
by Boggy Creek Beast

7:20

[Private video]

Rudiger Roll : Cloth Material - Fabric - Boggy Creek Beast 5 videos 61 views Last updated on Oct 9, 2018
Quote:

A list of commonly available cloth materials/fabric that work with the Rudiger Roll Friction Fire method. I have also used Cotton bed sheets, pillow cases, bath towels, and underwear.

Rudiger Roll video 38 : Bandana (Cotton handkerchief) Fire Roll Friction Fire
by Boggy Creek Beast

8:22

Rudiger Roll video 39 : T-shirt (100% Cotton T-shirt ) Fire Roll Friction Fire T-shirt
by Boggy Creek Beast

4:15

Rudiger Roll video 40 : Wash Cloth ( 100% Cotton washcloth ) Fire Roll Friction Fire
by Boggy Creek Beast

3:03

Rudiger Roll video 41 : Blue Jeans ( 100 % Cotton Denim Rudiger Roll ) Fire Roll Friction Fire
by Boggy Creek Beast

5:01

Rudiger Roll Bandana - Fabric used in Nature to make Fire - No "unweaving" - SEE DESCRIPTION
by Boggy Creek Beast
Posted by: BruceZed

Re: Primative Firemaking - 11/30/18 02:28 PM

what I find with a Lighter is that it is below -25c they will work once after you take it out of your pocket and below -40c they might not work at all if you do not light it very quickly after you take it out of your pocket. it is always my first line of fire lighting, that save matches, but they are not totally reliable and at become less so at extreme cold temperatures.
Posted by: Montanero

Re: Primative Firemaking - 11/30/18 02:37 PM

Originally Posted By: BruceZed
what I find with a Lighter is that it is below -25c they will work once after you take it out of your pocket and below -40c they might not work at all if you do not light it very quickly after you take it out of your pocket. it is always my first line of fire lighting, that save matches, but they are not totally reliable and at become less so at extreme cold temperatures.


My experience mirrors this.
Posted by: dougwalkabout

Re: Primative Firemaking - 11/30/18 05:36 PM

Originally Posted By: Montanero
Originally Posted By: BruceZed
what I find with a Lighter is that it is below -25c they will work once after you take it out of your pocket and below -40c they might not work at all if you do not light it very quickly after you take it out of your pocket. it is always my first line of fire lighting, that save matches, but they are not totally reliable and at become less so at extreme cold temperatures.


My experience mirrors this.

Agreed.

It helps to shake the lighter vigorously while still warming inside your glove/hand.

Also, for very cold conditions, the old "Cricket" style lighter with the adjustable flame is helpful -- maximum gas flow. These are still available at dollar stores. The quality isn't the same as Bics, but they are cheap and handy for general use -- I keep one in the pocket of every jacket and pack I own. (Naturally there is a mini Bic in my pants pocket as backup.)